“Video: Should I get the COVID-19 if I have an autoimmune disease?”

The approval of COVID-19 vaccines has brought with it hope, excitement, as well as concerns. AARDA is committed to ensuring you have the information you need to make the right decisions for your health. A panel of medical experts will discuss frequently asked questions regarding COVID-19 vaccines, as well as address audience questions.

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COVID, CAMERAS and AI: the story of a pandemic drone

As the COVID-19 death toll mounts and the world hangs its hopes on effective vaccines, what else can we do to save lives in this pandemic? In UniSA’s case, design world-first technology that combines engineering, drones, cameras, and artificial intelligence to monitor people’s vital health signs remotely.

In 2020 the University of South Australia joined forces with the world’s oldest commercial drone manufacturer, Draganfly Inc, to develop technology which remotely detects the key symptoms of COVID-19 – breathing and heart rates, temperature, and blood oxygen levels.

Within months, the technology had moved from drones to security cameras and kiosks, scanning vital health signs in 15 seconds and adding social distancing software to the mix.

In September 2020, Alabama State University became the first higher education institution in the world to use the technology to spot COVID-19 symptoms in its staff and students and enforce social distancing, ensuring they had one of the l

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Getting Ready For A Future Pandemic Worse Than COVID-19

Mark Ryan, from WHO, points out that we may still not facing what “the big one”. I met with Dr Renuka Tiperneni (U. Michigan), Dr Jeremy Greene (Johns Hopkins), and Dr. Rebekah Gee (Louisiana State U) to explore how public health can be galvanized so that a new administration best prepares the country to face a future pandemic that is worse than Covid-19.

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Aerial Video: Berkeley Lab From Above

View Berkeley Lab from the sky in this aerial video, which features drone footage taken earlier this year by Thor Swift, lead photographer in Berkeley Lab’s Creative Services office of the Information Technology Division. The video was produced by Marilyn Sargent, a multimedia producer in the Strategic Communications department.

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NRAO’s Baseline Episode 4: Measuring the Expanding Universe

How fast is the universe expanding? We don’t know for sure.Astronomers study cosmic expansion by measuring the Hubble constant. They have measured this constant in several different ways, but some of their results don’t agree with each other. This disagreement, or tension, in the Hubble constant is a growing controversy in astronomy.

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Pharmacist-Led Clinic Improves Diabetes Outcomes, Lowers Costs

Pharmacist Candis Morello, PharmD, of Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at UC San Diego, discusses her Diabetes Intensive Medical Management (DIMM) “tune up” clinic for complex type 2 diabetes patients – and why this team-based approach is better for patients and more cost effective for health systems and payers.

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O-REU Program

Recently, the Texas A&M University College of Engineering kicked off an online version of its Research Experiences for Undergraduates program. Taking place over the summer, this fully remote program gives 58 students from around the U.S. valuable research experience in computational modeling, theory and data-driven topics in science and engineering.

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Larger study to test combination treatment for COVID-19

A study is now enrolling participants to determine whether a treatment combining a low dose of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin can prevent hospitalization and death in people with COVID-19.

Dr. Ann Collier, professor of medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the University of Washington School of Medicine, explains the national study is looking to enroll 2,000 patients at sites across the country.

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“None of Us Want to Stand Still” Documentary

None of Us Want to Stand Still” is a documentary made in partnership with Rush University Medical Center and Georgetown University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. The documentary shines a light onto the reality of how poorly people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are treated in the healthcare system. The film gives voice to advocates to share their stories, as well as experts’ opinions on how the healthcare system can improve the treatment of persons with intellectual disabilities and on how changes can be made on all levels of a healthcare organization to better treat these patients.

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LEARN webinar on suicide prevention training

It can be easy to feel disconnected during the COVID-19 pandemic as people are not able to participate in their community as before. Experts recognize the increased levels of stress and anxiety across almost every family in the nation and the world. That’s why Christopher DeCou, clinical psychologist at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, and Jennifer Stuber, director of Forefront Suicide Prevention, recorded a webinar for parents to learn how to recognize signs of distress and respond to someone at risk of suicide.

“Suicide prevention is something that we all need to know. It’s something like CPR,” Stuber said.

DeCou and Stuber added it’s important to take proactive steps to lock up the means people can use to harm themselves, like firearms or medications.

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Engineering develop ventilator and mask prototypes using 3D printing to help during coronavirus pandemic

Engineers at Binghamton University, State University of New York are working with healthcare providers in the region to develop technology to help deal with the coronavirus pandemic.

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Binghamton University Student Builds Ventilator Prototype to Assist During COVID-19 Pandemic

Jacob Goodman, a mechanical engineering student at Binghamton University, State University of New York, built a ventilator prototype using mainly parts he purchased from Walmart, to help during the coronavirus pandemic. Here he breaks down the parts and how the device works.

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Therapy dog lifts patients’ hearts

Kepu Savou thought he had come down with a cold. When his symptoms persisted, he visited a doctor and learned that his heart was failing – something Savou never would’ve imagined at age 29.

He has been an inpatient at UW Medical Center, awaiting a donor heart for transplant. While the monthslong experience has been difficult, he says a program called Paws for Patients has provided much-needed emotional support. Program volunteers bring registered therapy dogs to visit patients who face challenging medical conditions.

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Guarding against a devastating tropical disease

Schistosomiasis is one of the most devastating tropical diseases in the world, second only to malaria in its prevalence. The only treatment currently used is extremely limited in its effectiveness and in who it can help. The Newmark Lab wants to develop something that protects people from being infected in the first place.

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What candy is better for you?

As Halloween approaches, people stock up on candy for trick-or-treaters. But is there a kind of candy that is better for you than others? Vanessa Imus, a registered dietitian at UW Medicine’s Weight Loss Management Center at UW Medical Center Roosevelt Clinic, says while candy is not ideal, if you were to choose one over another to eat, something with a little bit of fat and protein, like a chocolate bar, is preferred because it’ll slow down how quickly the sugar enters your bloodstream.

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‘Return to Learn’ helps students post-concussion

Across the nation, concussion protocols are in place to guide student athletes’ safe return to sports participation. But no clear guidelines exist for students’ appropriate return to the classroom. Dr. Monica Vavilala and researchers at Harborview Medical Center created “Return to Learn,” a road map for schools to help youths recover their academic well-being.

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Are plant-based meats healthier?

As more fast food chains add vegan burger options to their menus, many might wonder if this is a healthier alternative to meat. Judy Simon, a UW Medicine dietitian, says some products do contain whole foods, like sweet potatoes or black beans. Take a look at the ingredient list. she advises. She cautions that some of the products have a lot of sodium, so you’ll want to check the nutritional labels.

“I just think it’s being aware of what you’re eating,” she says.

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