Where Did the Asian Longhorned Ticks in the U.S. Come From?

The invasive population of Asian longhorned ticks in the United States likely began with three or more self-cloning females from northeastern Asia, according to a Rutgers-led study. Asian longhorned ticks outside the U.S. can carry debilitating diseases. In the United States and elsewhere they can threaten livestock and pets. The new study, published in the journal Zoonoses and Public Health, sheds new light on the origin of these exotic ticks and how they are spreading across the United States.

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Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss How to Help Free Market Fight Coronavirus

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 25, 2020) – Stephen K. Burley, director of the RCSB Protein Data Bank headquartered at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, is available for

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Expert analysis by Thunderbird’s Doug Guthrie: The Age of Cooptation: The Cost of Doing Business in Xi’s China

The Age of Cooptation: The Cost of Doing Business in Xi’s China (Business, China, China Capitalism, International Trade, Supply Chain,

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Major Asian Gene Study to Help Doctors Battle Disease

“Under-representation of Asian populations in genetic studies has meant that medical relevance for more than half of the human population is reduced,” one researcher said.

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Thunderbird’s Allen Morrison offers expert analysis of China trade deal phase 1 agreement, says US agricultural trade with China may never return to its previous levels.

Thunderbird’s renowned expert on Chinese business, Allen Morrison, offers analysis of phase 1 trade agreement, says US agricultural trade with

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