Five language outcome measures evaluated for intellectual disabilities studies

Expressive language sampling yielded five language-related outcome measures that may be useful for treatment studies in intellectual disabilities, especially fragile X syndrome. The measures were generally valid and reliable across the range of ages, IQs and autism symptom severity of participants. According to the study, led by UC Davis researchers and funded by NIH, the measures are also functional in supporting treatments that can improve language, providing far reaching benefits for individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Read more

COVID-19 Appears Less Severe in Children, Says Review in Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

As outbreaks of COVID-19 disease caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue worldwide, there’s reassuring evidence that children have fewer symptoms and less severe disease. That’s among the insights provided by an expert review in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Read more

COVID-19 Appears Less Severe in Children, Says Review in Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

As outbreaks of COVID-19 disease caused by the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continue worldwide, there’s reassuring evidence that children have fewer symptoms and less severe disease. That’s among the insights provided by an expert review in The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, the official journal of The European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Read more

Mount Sinai and Harbour BioMed Collaborate to Advance Novel Biotherapies for the Treatment of Cancer and Coronavirus COVID-19

Collaboration combines Harbour BioMed’s proprietary H2L2 Harbour Mice® platform for fully human monoclonal antibody generation with Mount Sinai’s translational medical research expertise.

Read more

Investigational Drug for People with Treatment-Resistant Epilepsy

Imagine not being able to drive, shower alone or even work because you are never quite sure when the next seizure will leave you incapacitated. Hope may be on the horizon for epilepsy patients who have had limited success with seizure drugs. In a study, led by a Johns Hopkins lead investigator, of 437 patients across 107 institutions in 16 countries, researchers found that the investigational drug cenobamate reduced seizures 55% on the two highest doses of this medication that were tested over the entire treatment period.

Read more

Mount Sinai Researcher’s Examine the Metabolic Effects of an Oral Blood Cancer Drug

Recent study found that an effective blood cancer treatment was associated with weight gain, obesity, and increased systolic blood pressure

Read more

Better Biosensor Technology Created for Stem Cells

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and other neurological disorders. The technology, which features a unique graphene and gold-based platform and high-tech imaging, monitors the fate of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons), according to a study in the journal Nano Letters.

Read more

Artificial Pancreas System Better Controls Blood Glucose Levels than Current Technology

Study based at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other centers finds new system has safety, efficacy benefits for people with type 1 diabetes

Read more

Moderate to Heavy Drinking During Pregnancy Alters Genes in Newborns, Mothers

Mothers who drink moderate to high levels of alcohol during pregnancy may be changing their babies’ DNA, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Read more