Advancing regenerative medicine therapies

University and community guests recently gathered to celebrate the 7,700 square-foot Good Manufacturing Practice facility’s grand opening in Hewitt Hall’s basement on the UC Irvine campus. Although the highly sterile environment remains off-limits for tours, the gala highlighted its importance to the campus, the UC system and the local community.

ASCO: Proton therapy demonstrates advantages in Phase III head and neck cancer trial

According to preliminary data from a multi-institution Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) achieved similar clinical outcomes and offered significant patient benefits when compared to traditional intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) as part of chemoradiation treatment for patients with oropharyngeal (head and neck) cancer.

Promising New Treatment for Patients with HR+ HER-2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

New research from Yale Cancer Center reveals first-of-its-kind data from a phase I study in patients with hormone receptor positive HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The results, which assess the safety and efficacy of a treatment known as PF-07248144, offer new hope for treating this aggressive type of breast cancer.

FAU Researchers Receive $1M in FDOH Grants to Fight Alzheimer’s Disease

With this funding, FAU researchers will shed light on the biological functions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by taking advantage of synthetic chemistry strategies; provide an innovative online screening tool for older drivers with cognitive decline; and gain a deeper understanding of the role of brain cholesterol in AD.

Study Examines U.S. Public Opinion of ‘Would-be’ Mass Shooters

A first-of-its-kind study sheds light on public opinion about would-be mass shooters, particularly regarding their mental health status. Willingness to “see something” and “say something,” especially when loved ones or associates are involved, hinges on whether the informant believes the criminal justice system will handle the situation effectively and fairly.

JMIR Dermatology Invites Submissions on Diversity in Dermatology

JMIR Publications is pleased to announce a new theme issue titled “Diversity in Dermatology” in JMIR Dermatology. The premier, peer-reviewed journal is indexed in Sherpa Romeo, Scopus, DOAJ, CABI, and PubMed Central/PubMed and is the official journal of the International Society of Digital Health in Dermatology (ISDHD).

Podcast: Experts in Health: The menopause and the controversial ‘male menopause’

Professor Eef Hogervorst, Professor of Biological Psychology at Loughborough University, sits down to discuss the factors influencing the menopause, what the best treatment options are, the relationship between oestrogen and dementia, and the controversies surrounding the andropause (the ‘male menopause’).

New treatment for a rare and aggressive cancer improves survival rates in breakthrough clinical trial

An innovative treatment significantly increases the survival of people with malignant mesothelioma, a rare but rapidly fatal type of cancer with few effective treatment options, according to results from a clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London.

Prof. Dr. Thanyavee Puthanakit, National Outstanding Researcher in Medical Science, with Clinical Research on the Treatment and Prevention of HIV in Youth

Prof. Dr. Thanyavee expressed her appreciation and honor for receiving the Outstanding Researcher Award.

New treatment developed to dramatically slow down the progression of blindness-causing retinal diseases

The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that Dr. Maesoon Im of the Brain Science Institute, together with Prof. Seung Ja Oh of Kyung Hee University and Prof. Kangwon Lee of Seoul National University, successfully incorporated anti-inflammatory drugs into a hydrogel to suppress inflammation in the retina and effectively deliver the drugs to the inflamed area.

Residents of Rural ‘Glades’ Take a ‘Leap of Faith’ to Combat Dementia

Compared to urban dwellers, racially/ethnically diverse older adults face up to an 80 percent greater risk of cognitive impairment in older age, and 2.5 times potentially preventable Alzheimer’s-related (ADRD) hospitalizations.

NIH grants support UCLA and Charles Drew University researchers’ efforts to end HIV epidemic

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has granted $2.1 million to UCLA’s Center for HIV Identification, Prevention, and Treatment Services (CHIPTS) and the UCLA-CDU Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) to support four research projects and an implementation science consultation hub.

Brain tumor treatment by targeting TUG1, a gene that controls replication stress

A new study has unravelled a crucial link between how cancer cells cope with replication stress and the role of Taurine Upregulated Gene 1 (TUG1). By targeting TUG1 with a drug, the researchers were able to control brain tumor growth in mice, suggesting a potential strategy to combat aggressive brain tumors such as glioblastomas.

Palex and Inbiomotion introduce pioneering test to aid oncologists in predicting recurrence and survival rates in breast cancer patients

Spain is the first country in the world to have this technology
• Results showing the clinical utility of the test were published in
Lancet Oncology and the Journal of National Cancer Institute
• The test is now available to oncologists and pathologists and will
benefit an estimated 24,000 patients each year in Spain

U.S. States Maintain Outdated Laws That Create Barriers to Screening and Treatment for Alcohol Use Disorder

Eighteen U.S. states have laws that allow insurance companies to deny health care payments to treat people who were intoxicated when they sustained an injury, despite evidence showing that these laws prevent people from receiving treatment for alcohol use disorder and shift costs from insurance companies to the health care system, the government, individuals and families.

“Stereotyped, devalued and shunned.” Experts address treating the stigma of Parkinson’s disease

Even the best treatment approaches for Parkinson’s disease are inadequate if they do not address patients’ feelings of social rejection, isolation, loneliness and other psychosocial effects of stigma, according to a report from experts specializing in Parkinson’s and other movement disorders.

Among Young People, Being Around Peers May Elicit Greater Drinking Cravings than the Presence of Alcohol

The presence of peers is a key prompt for alcohol cravings among young people, according to a new study in Alcohol: Clinical & Experimental Research. When certain settings, people, or items—a bar, a friend, a glass—are paired with alcohol, they can become conditioned cues, eliciting drinking cravings. These learned reactions are associated with alcohol use disorder (AUD), treatment outcomes, and relapse. Adolescents and emerging adults are particularly susceptible to peer influence. In real-world settings, studies have found that the presence of peers predicts young people’s intensifying drinking cravings at the moment. In laboratory studies, however, peer influence is largely absent, potentially limiting the usefulness of their findings. Better understanding peers as alcohol cues could inform more effective AUD prevention and treatment programs. For the current study, researchers from Brown University, RI, evaluated alcohol cravings among youth in the human laboratory, using drinking-

AI Tool Predicts Colon Cancer Survival, Treatment Response

New AI tool accurately predicts both overall survival and disease-free survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis.
The model uses visual markers on pathology images to glean insights into a tumor’s genomic profile and predicts tumor behavior, disease progression, treatment response.
The new model could help augment clinical decision-making.
Because the AI tool relies on images alone, it could be particularly valuable for hospitals lacking the technology or expertise to perform sophisticated genomic profiling of tumor tissues.

Prompt Treatment for Functional Neurological Disorder in Children Is Highly Effective

Treatment is scarce for functional neurological disorder (FND), which requires a multidisciplinary approach. A special report published in the March/April issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry (HRP) aims to show clinicians and institutions around the world what is needed to establish effective community treatment programs for FND, as well as hospital inpatient and outpatient interventions, in their own health care settings. HRP is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Chula’s AICute Innovation – An Assessment Tool for Ischemic Stroke Risk to Reduce Disability and Death

A research team from the Faculty of Medicine and Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University has jointly developed AICute, an innovative program to assess the chances of stroke caused by heart disease (Ischemic Stroke), aimed at helping hospitals that lack cardiologists to enhance the effectiveness of stroke treatment, reduce congestion in hospitals and medical schools.

Improved Accuracy of Screening Tools for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder May Lead to Faster Diagnosis and More Timely Intervention

A new screening instrument has the potential to more accurately identify fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), reducing missed and erroneous diagnoses in affected children and facilitating treatment and support, a new study suggests. Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) is a known cause of birth and growth defects and neurobehavioral issues.