Common Prebiotic Fiber Mitigates Harm of High-salt Diet in Rats

New research in rats finds a diet high in the fiber inulin offered a protective effect against the damage of a high-salt diet. The research will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference

Forever Chemicals Linked to Hypertension in Middle-Aged Women

Middle-aged women with higher blood concentrations of common synthetic chemicals called per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), also called “forever chemicals” and found in water, soil, air and food, were at greater risk of developing high blood pressure, compared to their peers who had lower levels of these substances, according to new research published today in Hypertension, an American Heart Association journal.

Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer Often Undertreated for Cardiovascular Risk Factors

Adults who survive childhood cancer have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease than the general population, yet they are 80% more likely to be undertreated for several cardiovascular risk factors: hypertension (also called high blood pressure), diabetes and high cholesterol, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Smidt Heart Institute: Annual Report Highlights

The 2022 Annual Report from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai is available now, detailing the latest research and medical achievements by the expert team ranked No. 1 for cardiology and cardiac surgery in California by U.S. News & World Report.

Study Examines Combined Effects of Medical Titration and Renal Denervation Treatment–Resistant Hypertension

Six-month outcomes from the randomized RADIANCE-HTN TRIO Trial comparing endovascular ultrasound renal denervation (RDN) to a sham procedure for treatment-resistant hypertension (HTN) found that the addition of a pharmacologic intervention led to further blood pressure reductions after RDN with a smaller increase in additional medications prescribed and less use of diuretics.

Exercise May Correct Leakage of Blood-brain Barrier Caused by High Blood Pressure

Article title: Transcytosis within PVN capillaries: a mechanism determining both hypertension-induced blood-brain barrier dysfunction and exercise-induced correction Authors: Matheus Garcia Fragas, Vanessa Brito Cândido, Gustavo Gastão Davanzo, Carla Rocha-Santos, Alexandre Ceroni, Lisete C. Michelini From the authors: “The present set…

UC San Diego Health Launches New Center to Spur Patient-Centered Technologies

From tele-monitoring patients with diabetes to using artificial intelligence to prevent sepsis, the newly launched Center for Health Innovation will seek to develop, test and commercialize technologies that make a real, measurable difference in the lives and wellbeing of patients.

Wayne State receives $2.6 million research award from American Heart Association

Black adults have a higher incidence of hypertension (HTN) and a greater risk of HTN-related cardiovascular disease compared to white adults. Even mild elevations in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease; therefore, early interventions for high blood pressure and hypertension are critical to assist in recommendations for lifestyle modification.

NYU Langone Health Named Coordinating Center for American Heart Association Health Equity Research Network to Prevent Hypertension in Black Communities

As part of a $20 million award from the America Heart Association, NYU Grossman School of Medicine has been named as the coordinating center for a new collaboration between eight universities to prevent hypertension and reduce racial inequities in cardiovascular disease outcomes in Black communities.

Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

Mobile apps can help those suffering from hypertension, improve communication between patients and providers

The use of physician-monitored mobile apps for tracking blood pressure can help curb the effects of chronic hypertension and improve communication between patients and providers, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Vast under-treatment of diabetes seen in global study

Nearly half a billion people have diabetes, but only 1 in 10 of those in low- and middle-income countries are getting the kind of care that could make their lives healthier, longer and more productive, according to a new global study of data. Many don’t even know they have the condition.

Final results of SPRINT study confirm controlling blood pressure critically important in preventing heart disease and stroke

News release about the follow-up data from the landmark SPRINT study of the effect of high blood pressure on cardiovascular disease have confirmed that aggressive blood pressure management — lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 120 mm Hg — dramatically reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, and death from these diseases, as well as death from all causes, compared to lowering systolic blood pressure to less than 140 mm Hg.

Lifetime Monitoring Following Infant Cardiac Surgery May Reduce Future Hypertension Risk

In a medical records study covering thousands of children, a U.S.-Canadian team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concludes that while surgery to correct congenital heart disease (CHD) within 10 years after birth may restore young hearts to healthy function, it also may be associated with an increased risk of hypertension — high blood pressure — within a few months or years after surgery.

Association between Hypertension and Gut Microbiome Imbalance during Pregnancy May Lead to New Preeclampsia Treatments

Article title: Gestational gut microbial remodeling is impaired in a rat model of preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension Authors: Jeanne A. Ishimwe, Adesanya Akinleye, Ashley C. Johnson, Michael R. Garrett, Jennifer M. Sasser From the authors: “These results reveal an…

During pandemic, potentially avoidable hospitalizations for non-COVID conditions fell more among whites

New research suggests that the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated existing racial health care disparities and that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than whites to outpatient care that could have helped prevent deterioration of their non–COVID-19 health conditions

Alcohol Plus Cadmium (via Smoking) Can Amplify Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk

Heavy drinking combined with cadmium exposure — most commonly via smoking — escalates the risk of hypertension, according to a new study. Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects 26 percent of the global population and is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Alcohol consumption and cadmium exposure are known risk factors for hypertension. Exposure to cadmium, a metal that accumulates in body organs, occurs mainly through smoking, which often accompanies heavy drinking. Other cadmium sources include certain foods, air pollution, and wine and beer. Alcohol increases the absorption of cadmium in the body, and evidence suggests that the two substances contribute to hypertension via shared physiological pathways. The new study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, is the first known epidemiological investigation of the combined effects of alcohol and cadmium on blood pressure.

Study Estimates Two-Thirds of COVID-19 Hospitalizations Due to Four Conditions

A new study estimates 64% of adult COVID-19 hospitalizations in the U.S. may have been prevented if there were less obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and heart failure. The model suggests notable differences by age and race/ethnicity in COVID-19 hospitalizations related to these conditions.

A New Beat Offers Free Online Seminar Examining Disparities in Cardiovascular Care During Heart Month

The Association of Black Cardiologists, Inc. (ABC) and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is offering a complimentary online seminar, “Tackling Disparities in CV Care: A Closer Look at Hypertension and Heart Failure” on Friday February 26, 2021. The program is part of a joint initiative called A New Beat which advocates for women and minorities rising as leaders in cardiology. It aims to foster careers of female and minority cardiologists, who can be poised to improve access to quality care for underserved populations.

CRF Offers Free Online Seminar to Help People Jump-Start their Heart Health During Heart Month

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, The Big Three: High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, and Diabetes, at 12:00 PM ET on February 22, 2021 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Sonia Tolani, cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar is part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative (WHHI), which empowers women with everyday tools they can use to defy heart disease.

Sleep Apnea Does Not Raise Blood Pressure in Young Women

Article title: Sex differences in integrated neuro-cardiovascular control of blood pressure following acute intermittent hypercapnic-hypoxia Authors:Dain W. Jacob, Elizabeth P. Ott, Sarah E. Baker, Zachariah M. Scruggs, Clayton L. Ivie, Jennifer L. Harper, Camila M. Manrique-Acevedo, Jaqueline K. Limberg From…

Surgeon General expects COVID-19 vaccine to be available by year’s end

In a wide-ranging talk with UCLA Health physicians, Wednesday, Oct. 28, United States Surgeon General Jerome Adams, MD, MPH, addressed the politicization of the pandemic and the means of containing the spread of COVID-19. He also offered hope that a vaccine for the virus will be available by year’s end.

Prevent Severe COVID Symptoms With Lifestyle Changes

Obesity is contributing to worse outcomes in people with COVID-19. Dr. Naomi Parrella, medical director of the Rush Center for Weight Loss and Bariatric Surgery, explains how managing your weight can lower your risk for severe COVID symptoms and help you prevent other chronic diseases.