Hypertension

Lifetime Monitoring Following Infant Cardiac Surgery May Reduce Future Hypertension Risk

In a medical records study covering thousands of children, a U.S.-Canadian team led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine concludes that while surgery to correct congenital heart disease (CHD) within 10 years after birth may restore young hearts to healthy function, it also may be associated with an increased risk of hypertension — high blood pressure — within a few months or years after surgery.

Alcohol Plus Cadmium (via Smoking) Can Amplify Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Risk

Heavy drinking combined with cadmium exposure — most commonly via smoking — escalates the risk of hypertension, according to a new study. Hypertension (high blood pressure) affects 26 percent of the global population and is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Alcohol consumption and cadmium exposure are known risk factors for hypertension. Exposure to cadmium, a metal that accumulates in body organs, occurs mainly through smoking, which often accompanies heavy drinking. Other cadmium sources include certain foods, air pollution, and wine and beer. Alcohol increases the absorption of cadmium in the body, and evidence suggests that the two substances contribute to hypertension via shared physiological pathways. The new study, in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, is the first known epidemiological investigation of the combined effects of alcohol and cadmium on blood pressure.

A New Beat Offers Free Online Seminar Examining Disparities in Cardiovascular Care During Heart Month

The Association of Black Cardiologists, Inc. (ABC) and the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) is offering a complimentary online seminar, “Tackling Disparities in CV Care: A Closer Look at Hypertension and Heart Failure” on Friday February 26, 2021. The program is part of a joint initiative called A New Beat which advocates for women and minorities rising as leaders in cardiology. It aims to foster careers of female and minority cardiologists, who can be poised to improve access to quality care for underserved populations.

CRF Offers Free Online Seminar to Help People Jump-Start their Heart Health During Heart Month

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) will hold a free online seminar, The Big Three: High Blood Pressure, High Cholesterol, and Diabetes, at 12:00 PM ET on February 22, 2021 hosted by Drs. Nisha Jhalani and Sonia Tolani, cardiologists from NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center. The seminar is part of a series of “Mini Med Schools” conducted by the CRF Women’s Heart Health Initiative (WHHI), which empowers women with everyday tools they can use to defy heart disease.

Cutting Down But Not Out: Very-Heavy Drinkers Needn’t Quit Completely for Cardiovascular Benefit

High-risk drinkers who substantially reduce their alcohol use can lower their risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) despite not completely abstaining, according to study findings published in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. CVD encompasses a range of conditions involving the heart or blood vessels, and is the leading cause of death in the US. It is also one of many negative health outcomes associated with heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD). Reductions in drinking can be defined using World Health Organization (WHO) ‘risk drinking levels’, which classify drinkers into ‘very high’, ‘high’, ‘moderate’ and ‘low’ risk categories based on their average daily alcohol consumption. Previous research has shown that a reduction of two or more levels (for example, from ‘very high’ to ‘moderate’) can lower the risk of multiple health issues, but did not assess the impact on CVD specifically. The latest study has examined associations between reductions in WHO risk drinking

Researchers Challenge New Guidelines on Aspirin in Primary Prevention

New guidelines recommend aspirin use in primary prevention for people ages 40 to 70 years old who are at higher risk of a first cardiovascular event, but not for those over 70. Yet, people over 70 are at higher risks of cardiovascular events than those under 70. As a result, health care providers are understandably confused about whether or not to prescribe aspirin for primary prevention of heart attacks or strokes, and if so, to whom.

Researchers Discover New, Treatable Pathway Known to Cause Hypertension in Obese People

There’s no question that as body weight increases, so too does blood pressure. Now, in a study of mice, Johns Hopkins researchers have revealed exactly which molecules are likely responsible for the link between obesity and blood pressure. Blocking one of these molecules — a signaling channel that’s found in a tiny organ on the side of your neck — effectively lowers blood pressure in obese mice, the researchers reported recently in the journal Circulation Research.

Abnormal Blood Pressure in Middle And Late Life Influences Dementia Risk

In a study that spanned two and a half decades and looked at data from more than 4,700 participants, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that abnormal blood pressure in midlife persisting into late life increases the likelihood of developing dementia. Although not designed to show cause and effect, the study suggests that maintaining a healthy blood pressure throughout life may be one way to help decrease one’s risk of losing brain function.

Announcing the TCT 2019 Late-Breaking Trials and Science

The Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF) has announced the 12 late-breaking trials and 16 late-breaking science presentations that will be reported at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) 2019 scientific symposium. TCT, the world’s premier educational meeting specializing in interventional cardiovascular medicine, will take place September 25 – 29, 2019 at The Moscone Center in San Francisco, California.