Gender Affirmation Treatment Delivery Route May Affect Heart Health

Transgender and gender diverse (TGD) people assigned male at birth are at increased heart health risk. The delivery route of estrogen medication is known to affect heart health risk in cisgender women. However, research is lacking on how estrogen route affects heart health in the TGD population.

APS Porter Physiology Development Fellowship Honored with an Association Impact Award

The American Physiological Society’s (APS) Porter Physiology Development Fellowship, the Society’s flagship diversity program, has been honored with an inaugural Impact Award from the Software & Information Industry Association’s (SIIA) Associations, Media and Publishing (AM&P) Network.

Oil Spill Effects on Mahi-mahi Go Far Beyond Initial Survival

New research into oil spills’ effects finds surviving the initial event does not guarantee success for the popular sport fish mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). Exposed fish faced temporary increased predation and did not spawn for the entire observation time.

Climate Change Double Whammy Causes Unexpected Effects in Pacific Mussels

Comparative physiologists studied how two aspects of climate change—warming temperatures and increasingly acidic waters—may affect the ecologically important Pacific blue mussel (Mytilus trossulus), a foundational species in the intertidal environments of the northern Pacific Ocean.

Vitamin B5 May Help Weight Loss by Turning on Brown Fat

Pantothenate acid, also known as vitamin B5, stimulated the production of brown fat in both cell cultures and mice, a new study finds. “[B5] has therapeutic potential for treating obesity and type II diabetes,” researchers conclude. The study was chosen as an APSselect article for July.

Intermittent Fasting Protects Kidneys of Obese Mice

New research in mice finds that time-restricted feeding improves markers of kidney and vascular health. The research will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference.

Common Prebiotic Fiber Mitigates Harm of High-salt Diet in Rats

New research in rats finds a diet high in the fiber inulin offered a protective effect against the damage of a high-salt diet. The research will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society and American Society for Nephrology Control of Renal Function in Health and Disease conference

Researchers Identify Potential Target for Treating Autoimmune Diseases

New research using a mouse model for multiple sclerosis has uncovered a potential new area to explore for possible treatments for autoimmune disorders.

Exercise Improves Health Markers in Young Female Survivors of Childhood Trauma

New research shows a progressive exercise training program mitigates some physiological and psychological effects of adverse childhood experiences in otherwise healthy young women. The study will be presented at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

High Caffeine Consumption Disrupts Heart Rhythms in Middle-aged Rats

New research finds that excess caffeine is more likely to cause irregular heart rhythms in middle aged rats than in young adult rats. The study will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022 in Philadelphia.

Five Minutes of Daily Breath Training Improves Exercise Tolerance in Middle-aged and Older Adults

New research finds potential for high-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training to help sedentary middle-aged and older adults transition to a healthier lifestyle. The study will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

New APS Leaders Take Office for Coming Year

The American Physiological Society (APS) is pleased to announce its new leadership: President Jennifer Pollock, PhD, FAPS, FAHA; President-elect Dee U. Silverthorn, PhD, FAPS, FAAA, FAAAS; and Councilors Lacy Alexander, PhD, FACSM; Margarita Curras-Collazo, PhD, FAPS; and Dexter Lee, PhD. The new officers were elected by APS membership and took office April 30, 2021.

3D Electrocardiogram Might Detect Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation

Rockville, Md. (November 25, 2020)—Atrial fibrillation is the most frequent arrhythmia in both equine and human athletes. In this study, researchers investigated whether the arrhythmogenic substrate—the preexisting condition that causes arrhythmia—present between the episodes of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) can…

Alcohol Use Increases among People Living with HIV during Stay-at-home Order

Researchers at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans honed in on one population particularly at risk during the pandemic: people living with HIV with at-risk alcohol use. They surveyed 80 people living with HIV in Louisiana during that state’s stay-at-home order, recruiting participants from the ongoing longitudinal Aging in Louisiana: Immunosenescence, HIV and Socioenvironmental Factors-Exercise (ALIVE-Ex) study.

How the Pandemic Has Changed Our Exercise Habits in (Sometimes) Positive Ways

The health disruptions caused by COVID-19 reverberate even beyond those who have contracted SARS-CoV-2. As the pandemic triggers moves to limit contact and thus transmission, many have found their daily routines, including their exercise habits, changing. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends adults between 18 and 64 get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise a week. WHO identifies physical inactivity as the “fourth leading risk factor for global mortality” and attributes approximately 3.2 million deaths a year to insufficient physical activity.

Pairing New Medications Could Offer Hope to Heart Disease Patients

Cardiologist Bertram Pitt, MD, sees promise in combining two new classes of medication into a treatment regimen for patients with cardiovascular disease. Pitt will discuss the advantages of this treatment plan in his plenary lecture at an American Physiological Society Conference in Estes Park, Colo.

Same Receptor, Different Effect: Research Uncovers New Sex-specific Factor in CV Disease

A common receptor may serve differentiated roles related to aging-associated cardiovascular disease in males and females. Jennifer DuPont, PhD, will present the findings of this first-of-its-kind study today at the American Physiological Society Aldosterone and ENaC Conference in Estes Park, Colo.