DNA Misfolding in White Blood Cells Increases Risk for Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers found, in mice, that changes in DNA sequence can trigger the chromosomes to misfold in a way that puts one at a heightened risk for Type 1 diabetes. The study revealed that differences in DNA sequences dramatically changed how the DNA was folded inside the nucleus, ultimately affecting the regulation of genes linked to the development Type 1 diabetes.

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AARDA Partners with AutoimmuneMom

Detroit, MI (January 30, 2019) – The American Autoimmune Related Disease Association (AARDA) is thrilled to announce our new partnership with AutoimmuneMom. For the last seven+ years, AutoimmuneMom has created a digital community through the hard work and dedication of Katie Cleary. Now, AARDA will proudly host the content that has brought together people with autoimmune disease through stories of how autoimmune disease impacts motherhood and pregnancy, general autoimmune information, personal stories, and doctor recommendations. AutoimmuneMom will continue to maintain its social media presence, but all website content will be hosted on AARDA.org.

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Cedars-Sinai Receives $20M to Create Kao Autoimmunity Institute

Cedars-Sinai today announced a $20 million gift from Dr. and Mrs. Min H. Kao and the Kao Family Foundation to create the Kao Autoimmunity Institute to advance research and treatment of rheumatologic diseases. The gift also will establish the Scleroderma Program within the institute to provide interdisciplinary and integrated care for scleroderma patients and to support research, outreach, training and education to help those with the disease.

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Study: First Evidence of Immune Response Targeting Brain Cells in Autism

In a paper published in Annals of Neurology, a physician-scientist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), and colleagues report the presence of cellular features consistent with an immune response targeting specialized brain cells in more than two thirds of autistic brains analyzed postmortem. These cellular characteristics – not previously observed in autism – lend critical new insight into autism’s origins and could pave the way to improved diagnosis and treatment for people with this disorder.

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