How Kids Eat: Five New Insights on Daily Habits and Childhood Obesity

What we eat during childhood can affect the health of individuals—and populations—for years to come. As rates of childhood obesity continue to rise, five studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE bring new insights into the diets of children and teens around the world.

New Research Shows Trend Toward Unhealthy Eating During Pandemic

As COVID-19 spread throughout the world, our daily routines and behaviors changed drastically. A new study of more than 2,000 people in the U.S. found that the pandemic has also affected how we eat. The authors found a decrease in the consumption of many food groups, particularly healthy foods such as vegetables and whole grains, compared to before the pandemic.

The Latest Science on Staying Healthy During Pregnancy

Healthy habits are particularly important during pregnancy. Four new studies being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE look at how supplements, eating habits and physical activity can affect various aspects of health during pregnancy.

Most Americans Are Not Getting Enough Fiber in Our Diets

Only 5% of men and 9% of women are getting the recommended daily amount of dietary fiber, according to a study being presented at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. Insufficient fiber intake is associated with a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes, two of the most common diseases in the U.S.

Health, safety tips for summer activities: IU experts available to comment

As Memorial Day weekend approaches, many people have plans to enjoy outdoor activities in the warmer weather. And while we have vaccines to protect against COVID-19, there are other safety measures to keep in mind while having fun in the…

Meeting Preview: Hot Topics at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE

Reporters and bloggers are invited to join top nutrition researchers and practitioners for a dynamic virtual program at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. The flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition runs June 7–10, 2021 and features research announcements, expert discussions and more.

Orangutan Finding Highlights Need to Protect Habitat

Wild orangutans are known for their ability to survive food shortages, but scientists have made a surprising finding that highlights the need to protect the habitat of these critically endangered primates, which face rapid habitat destruction and threats linked to climate change. Scientists found that the muscle mass of orangutans on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia was significantly lower when less fruit was available. That’s remarkable because orangutans are thought to be especially good at storing and using fat for energy, according a Rutgers-led study in the journal Scientific Reports.

ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS REVITALIZES STRATEGIC PLAN FOR DYNAMIC HEALTH CARE ENVIRONMENT

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics’ Board of Directors has revitalized the organization’s ongoing Strategic Plan to prioritize programs and initiatives in four areas where the Academy will focus efforts to accelerate progress towards achieving its vision and mission.

Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease

A chemical modification of RNA that can be influenced by diet appears to play a key role in polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder that is the fourth leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., UT Southwestern researchers report in a new study. The findings, published online today in Cell Metabolism, suggest new ways to treat this incurable condition.

Making homemade baby food is likely easier and cheaper than you think

A recent report from a House Oversight subcommittee revealed that commercial baby foods are “tainted with significant levels of toxic heavy metals, including arsenic, lead, cadmium and mercury,” a finding that sparked concern for parents across the country.

The report noted that toxic heavy metals could impact a baby’s neurological development and long-term brain function, but a registered dietician from UTHealth said the bottom line is that we don’t really know the impact toxic metals can have on child development.

Sugar not so nice for your child’s brain development

New research led by a University of Georgia faculty member in collaboration with a University of Southern California research group has shown in a rodent model that daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during adolescence impairs performance on a learning and memory task during adulthood. The group further showed that changes in the bacteria in the gut may be the key to the sugar-induced memory impairment.

University Hospitals Portage Medical Center Opens Food for Life Market

University Hospitals (UH) Portage Medical Center is opening a UH Food for Life Market to set patients up for success in nutrition and dietary education. The UH Food for Life Market is part of a holistic approach to addressing food insecurity and the medical conditions, including chronic health conditions, that are impacted by nutrition and access to healthy food.