Researchers Identify Potential Target for Treating Autoimmune Diseases

New research using a mouse model for multiple sclerosis has uncovered a potential new area to explore for possible treatments for autoimmune disorders.

A Prune—Or Six—a Day May Keep Inflammation at Bay

A study in postmenopausal people suggests eating nutrient-rich prunes every day may be beneficial to bone health, reducing inflammatory factors that contribute to osteoporosis. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

Antioxidant, Inflammation Levels May Reveal New Diagnostic Tool for Breast Cancer

A new study that analyzes levels of antioxidants and stress markers in the blood could lead to a new diagnostic tool for breast cancer. The research will be presented this week in Philadelphia at the American Physiological Society’s (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2022.

How Did Red Algae Survive in Extreme Environments?

Red algae have persisted in hot springs and surrounding rocks for about 1 billion years. Now, a Rutgers-led team will investigate why these single-celled extremists have thrived in harsh environments – research that could benefit environmental cleanups and the production of biofuels and other products.

More healthful milk chocolate by adding peanut, coffee waste

Milk chocolate is a consumer favorite, but it isn’t exactly health food. Now, researchers report a new way to combine milk chocolate with waste peanut skins to boost its antioxidant properties and present their results today at the American Chemical Society Fall 2020 Virtual Meeting & Expo.