Sports Medicine Physician Available to Comment on Concussion Following Tua Tagovailoa’s Injury

Following last night’s concussion of Miami Dolphins football star Tua Tagovailoa, one sports medicine physician is reminding sports fans and athletes alike about the dangers of head injuries.  “Watching the frightening moment when Tua Tagovailoa was violently tackled and landed…

UCI is key member of multi-institutional, $126 million NIH brain mapping project

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 22, 2022 – The University of California, Irvine will participate in a five-year, multi-institutional, $126 million grant from the National Institutes of Health supporting the BRAIN Initiative Cell Atlas Network. The project aims to describe the cells that make up the human brain in unprecedented molecular detail, classifying them into more precise subtypes and pinpointing their location.

Mount Sinai Researchers Use Artificial Intelligence to Uncover the Cellular Origins of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Cognitive Disorders

Deep learning models represent “an entirely new paradigm for studying dementia”

Why We Fit A Mini Brain with a Mini Cap

It could be the world’s tiniest EEG electrode cap, created to measure activity in a brain model the size of a pen dot. Its designers expect the device to lead to better understanding of neural disorders and how potentially dangerous chemicals affect the brain.

This engineering feat, led by Johns Hopkins University researchers and detailed today in Science Advances, expands what researchers can accomplish with organoids, including mini brains—the lab-grown balls of human cells that mimic some of a brain’s structure and functionality.

How not to use brain scans in neuroscience

The idea that a lone snapshot of a brain can tell you about an individual’s personality or mental health has been the basis of decades of neuroscience studies. That approach was punctured by a paper in Nature earlier this year showing that scientists have massively underestimated how large such studies must be to produce reliable findings. At the center of the research is MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) brain scans. Reaching that conclusion required getting a far broader view of the field than was possible until recently. Along with colleagues at a number of institutions as well as his advisor, Pitt Professor of Psychiatry Beatriz Luna, Tervo-Clemmens combined three recent publicly available studies that together included MRI data from around 50,000 participants.

Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Captures ‘Invisible’ Traumatic Brain Injuries

Rama Madhurapantula, of the Illinois Institute of Technology, will describe how synchrotron X-ray diffraction can aid in diagnosing invisible traumatic brain injuries in their presentation, “X-ray fiber diffraction to elucidate tissue transition and changes to molecular packing in relation damage,” held Sunday, July 31 at the annual ACA meeting. While traditional imaging methods work on the micron scale, Madhurapantula’s team showed synchrotron X-ray diffraction can capture much smaller changes to myelin on the nanometer to angstrom scale in situ.

Research reveals how brain inflammation may link Alzheimer’s risk, sleep disturbance

A multisite research team from the University of California, Irvine, the University of Wisconsin–Madison and Wake Forest University has discovered that brain inflammation may link Alzheimer’s disease risk with sleep disturbance, which may aid early detection and prevention efforts by identifying novel treatment targets at preclinical stages.

Women’s Brain Project and Altoida Announce Results Highlighting Sex-Based Differences Using Predictive Digital Biomarker in Alzheimer’s Disease

The Women’s Brain Project, an international non-profit organization studying gender and sex determinants to brain and mental health and Altoida, a precision neurology company pioneering non-invasive brain health diagnostics using AI and augmented reality (AR), today announced results from a study showing sex-based differences using digital biomarker data collected from Altoida’s digital cognitive assessment platform.

Molecular ‘Connector’ Helps Cocaine Latch on to Brain Cells, Even When Drug Is in Low Doses

Scientists have long known that cocaine works by latching on to molecular connectors on the surface of brain cells, allowing dopamine, a chemical that promotes feelings of pleasure and reward, to accumulate in the space between brain cells. Now, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have found a molecular connector, known as the BASP1 receptor, that binds cocaine, even when the drug is present in very low doses.

Mount Sinai Launches Neural Epigenomics Research Center

The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has launched a new research center devoted to understanding how epigenomics influences the nervous system under both healthy and disease conditions. The Center for Neural Epigenome Engineering aims to dramatically expand Mount Sinai’s ability to conduct research in this field, facilitating new discoveries and the development of long-sought treatments for a variety of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Areas of expansion include chromatin biochemistry, chemical biology, protein engineering, and single-cell “omics.”

New guideline refines care for brain bleeds: Compression socks, some meds not effective

Some treatments or preventive therapies used to manage intracerebral hemorrhages (ICH), or a bleeding stroke, are not as effective as previously believed, according to the new American Heart Association/American Stroke Association guideline for caring for people with spontaneous ICH, published today in the Association’s Stroke journal. Guidelines detail the latest, evidence-based treatment recommendations and are the Association’s official clinical practice recommendations.

Henry Ford Stroke Centers Earn Advanced Stroke Certifications from The Joint Commission

Henry Ford Medical Center – Brownstown has earned an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital advanced stroke certification from The Joint Commission, making it the first freestanding Emergency Room in the State of Michigan to do so, and Henry Ford Macomb Hospital has earned recertification as a Primary Stroke Center.

Tufts University Researchers Discover New Function Performed by Nearly Half of Brain Cells

Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine have discovered a previously unknown function performed by a type of cell that comprises nearly half of all cells in the brain.

The scientists say this discovery in mice of a new function by cells known as astrocytes opens a whole new direction for neuroscience research that might one day lead to treatments for many disorders ranging from epilepsy to Alzheimer’s to traumatic brain injury.

New brain learning mechanism calls for revision of long-held neuroscience hypothesis

In an article published today in Scientific Reports (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-10466-8), researchers from Bar-Ilan University in Israel reveal that the brain learns completely differently than has been assumed since the 20th century. The new experimental observations suggest that learning is mainly performed in neuronal dendritic trees, where the trunk and branches of the tree modify their strength, as opposed to modifying solely the strength of the synapses (dendritic leaves), as was previously thought. These observations also indicate that the neuron is actually a much more complex, dynamic and computational element than a binary element that can fire or not. Just one single neuron can realize deep learning algorithms, which previously required an artificial complex network consisting of thousands of connected neurons and synapses. The new demonstration of efficient learning on dendritic trees calls for new approaches in brain research, as well as for the generation

For Neurons, Where They Begin Isn’t Necessarily Where They End

Scientists at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Rady Children’s Institute of Genomic Medicine describe novel methods for inferring the movement of human brain cells during fetal development by studying healthy adult individuals who have recently passed away from natural causes.

UTSW-led research identifies new imaging biomarkers that predict antidepressant response

The outcome predictive models were developed in part using data from a large multi-center National Institute of Mental Health-funded study and published in the journal Biological Psychiatry. The findings provide strong evidence that the current trial-and-error approach used in clinical practice for the selection of the right antidepressant can be replaced with this new precision medicine approach.