Researchers Show Novel Device Improves Blood Sugar Control in Hyperinsulinism Patients Whose Pancreas Has Been Removed

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have demonstrated that an experimental device can improve blood sugar control in patients who developed diabetes after their pancreas was removed to treat their hyperinsulinism, a genetic disease in which the pancreas produces too much insulin. Using a combination of continuous glucose monitoring, two hormone pumps, and an algorithm, the device, known as the bihormonal bionic pancreas (BHBP) and developed by researchers at Boston University, helped HI patients with diabetes maintain stable glucose levels over the study period.

Novel diabetes drug candidate shows promising properties in human islets and mouse models

Researchers have discovered a new drug candidate that offers a major advance to treat diabetes. Tested on human and mouse pancreatic islets, mouse and rat cell cultures and animal models of Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, the drug significantly improved four detrimental characteristics of diabetes.

Researchers Find New Role for Dopamine in Gene Transcription and Cell Proliferation

A joint group of researchers at the George Washington University and the University of Pittsburgh have found that dopamine and the dopamine D2 receptor modulate expression via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. This pathway is responsible for control of cell proliferation and organ identity and is implicated in cancer, thus having broad implications for health and development of new therapeutics