UNH Researchers Find Synchronization of Memory Cells Critical For Learning and Forming Memories

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that the neurons involved in Pavlovian learning shift their behavior and become more synchronized when a memory is being formed – a finding that helps better understand memory mechanisms and provides clues for the development of future therapies for memory-related diseases like dementia, autism and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Professors Create Free Research-Backed Games to Train Your Brain

University professors from New York and California designed and developed three digital games – available online and in the iOS and Google Play app stores – to help its users’ brains work more efficiently. While some digital games falsely claim to improve cognitive skills, these three games have actually proven to. Evidenced through a series of research studies, these games can help users boost memory, inhibition, and cognitive flexibility.

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Objective Subtle Cognitive Difficulties Predict Amyloid Accumulation and Neurodegeneration

Researchers report that accumulating amyloid protein occurred faster among persons deemed to have “objectively-defined subtle cognitive difficulties” (Obj-SCD) than among persons considered to be “cognitively normal,” offering a potential new early biomarker for Alzheimer’s disease.

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Is there an app for that? HU professors, students to study how millennials’ smartphone photos affect their lives

Do we truly understand how younger adults incorporate photography into their daily lives? If we did, could this knowledge help lead to the development of better mobile apps that could help the younger generation with life management in ways that meet their needs?

Harrisburg University Social Computing and Human-Centered Interaction Design Professor Dr. Tamara Peyton and Interactive Media Studies Professor Dr.

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Drugs commonly taken to improve cognition only boost short-term focus – at high cost

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 8, 2019 –The use of prescription stimulants by those without medically diagnosed conditions marks a growing trend among young adults – particularly college students seeking a brain boost. But according to a study led by the University of California, Irvine, taking a nonprescribed psychostimulant may slightly improve a person’s short-term focus but impede sleep and mental functions that rely on it – such as working memory.

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