Education May Be Protective for People with Gene for Familial Early Onset Alzheimer’s

Even for people who carry the gene for early onset Alzheimer’s disease, more years of education may slow the development of beta-amyloid plaques in the brain that are associated with the disease, according to a new study published in the August 5, 2020, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Magnum Venus Products licenses ORNL co-developed additive manufacturing technologies

The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has licensed two additive manufacturing-related technologies that aim to streamline and ramp up production processes to Knoxville-based Magnum Venus Products, Inc., a global manufacturer of fluid movement and product solutions for industrial applications in composites and adhesives.

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Safer, longer-lasting energy storage requires focus on interface of advanced materials

More studies at the interface of battery materials, along with increased knowledge of the processes at work, are unleashing a surge of knowledge needed to more quickly address the demand for longer-lasting portable electronics, electric vehicles and stationary energy storage for the electric grid.

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Ground System for NASA’s Roman Space Telescope Completes Major Review

NASA’s Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope has just successfully completed a preliminary design review of the mission’s ground systems, including the Science Operations Center that will be hosted by the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Maryland. This means the plan for science operations has met all of the design, schedule, and budget requirements. The mission will now proceed to the next phase: building the newly designed systems that will enable planning and scheduling of Roman observations and managing the resulting data.

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SARS-CoV-2 screening strategies for safe reopening of college campuses

What The Study Did: This study defines the screening performance standards for SARS-CoV-2 tests that would permit the safe return of students to U.S. residential college campuses this fall.

Authors: A. David Paltiel, Ph.D., of the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Connecticut, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/

(doi:10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.16818)

Editor’s Note: The article includes funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Media advisory: The full study and commentary are linked to this news release.
Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/1

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Continuing online instruction could contribute to widening achievement gaps by family income or socioeconomic status

The latest research from Notre Dame’s Chloe Gibbs explores how time spent in school affects children’s cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes. This research finds that more instructional time in the early years has important benefits for children over the short- and long-term, particularly children learning English and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

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COVID-19 Community Relief Funds raised more than $1 billion across U.S., research led by Lilly Family School of Philanthropy professor Laurie Paarlberg finds

COVID-19 relief funds at local United Ways and community foundations across the United States raised more than $1.05 billion and distributed at least $589 million to financially vulnerable individuals and nonprofits leading the pandemic response in their communities as of June 30.

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Texas Cave Sediment Upends Meteorite Explanation for Global Cooling

Texas researchers from the University of Houston, Baylor University and Texas A&M University have discovered evidence for why the earth cooled dramatically 13,000 years ago, dropping temperatures by about 3 degrees Centigrade. The evidence is buried in a Central Texas cave, where horizons of sediment have preserved unique geochemical signatures from ancient volcanic eruptions — signatures previously mistaken for extraterrestrial impacts, researchers say.

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National Farmers Market Week Kicks Off Sunday, and D.C. Ranks #1 in the U.S.

Aug. 2-8 marks National Farmers Market Week! D.C. ranks number one for farmers markets among the 100 largest U.S. cities according to the 2020 American Fitness Index rankings published by ACSM and the Anthem Foundation. More than 8,600 farmers markets currently operate across the U.S., stimulating the local economy and providing access to nourishing food.

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Youth with Diabetes Who are Involved in the Decision to Start Continuous Glucose Monitoring are More Likely to Continue Using It

In a new study published in Diabetes Care, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that youth who are involved with the decision to start CGM are more likely to continue using the monitoring technology more than two months after starting. The findings suggest that children and adolescents who do not have a role in the decision are less likely to be satisfied with the device and use the device consistently.

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NASA’s Webb Telescope Will Study Jupiter, Its Rings, and Two Intriguing Moons

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will have a challenging early assignment in the solar system: observe the largest, fastest-rotating planet—Jupiter—as well as its faint rings and two of the four Galilean satellites: icy Ganymede and fiery Io. In addition to laying groundwork for the rest of Webb’s mission, the ambitious program should yield new scientific insights, not only into the Jovian system, but also the geological history of Earth and exoplanet science.

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Clinical Reference Laboratory Receives FDA Emergency Use Authorization for Best-in-Class Self-Collected COVID-19 Saliva Test

Today, Clinical Reference Laboratory (CRL), one of the largest privately held clinical testing laboratories in the U.S., announced that it received FDA Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) and is scaling up capacity for CRL Rapid Response™, a saliva-based COVID-19 RT-PCR test that can be self-collected at home, work or any other setting. The test, shown in CRL’s EUA studies to be more sensitive and accurate than the standard COVID-19 anterior nasal swab test, detects the presence of coronavirus in the saliva of the test taker. In addition, the test is more comfortable and easier to administer, is not “technique dependent” and virtually anyone can self-collect an adequate sample for testing, with test results available in 24-48 hours of receipt at CRL. CRL Rapid Response™ is ready for immediate commercial launch, making it the first large-scale service of its kind focused on the American workforce. Testing is critical to safely helping America get back to work, which is why CRL is offering

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Wayne State-led team explores link between diabetes, obesity and liver disease

Faculty from Wayne State University’s Eugene Applebaum College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences are leading a team of researchers to understand the causal relationships between diabetes, obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in hopes of developing a treatment.

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SHANNON FRATTAROLI NAMED DIRECTOR OF THE JOHNS HOPKINS CENTER FOR INJURY RESEARCH AND POLICY AT BLOOMBERG SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH

Shannon Frattaroli, PhD, MPH, a public health policy researcher with 20 years of experience in the field of injury prevention and associate professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, has been named the next director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Injury Research and Policy.

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Berkeley Lab Part of Multi-Institutional Team Awarded $60M for Solar Fuels Research

The Department of Energy has awarded $60 million to a new solar fuels initiative – called the Liquid Sunlight Alliance (LiSA) – led by Caltech in close partnership with Berkeley Lab. LiSA will build on the foundational work of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP).

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