LLNL explores laser beam shaping to improve metal 3D printing

Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are addressing the issue of porosity and other phenomenon that causes defects in metal 3D printing by exploring alternative shapes to the Gaussian beams commonly employed in high-power laser printing processes such as laser powder bed fusion (LBPF).

LLNL optimizes flow-through electrodes for electrochemical reactors with 3D printing

To take advantage of the growing abundance and cheaper costs of renewable energy, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists and engineers are 3D printing flow-through electrodes (FTEs), core components of electrochemical reactors used for converting CO2 and other molecules to useful products.

Taking cues from nature, breakthrough ‘cellular fluidics’ technology could have sweeping impacts

Inspired by the way plants absorb and distribute water and nutrients, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have developed a groundbreaking method for transporting liquids and gases using 3D-printed lattice design and capillary action phenomena.

Story tips: Urban climate impacts, materials’ dual approach and healing power

ORNL identifies a statistical relationship between the growth of cities and the spread of paved surfaces. // ORNL successfully demonstrates a technique to heal dendrites that formed in a solid electrolyte. // ORNL combines additive manufacturing with conventional compression molding.

ORNL receives three 2021 FLC Awards for technology transfer

Three technologies developed by researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have won National Technology Transfer Awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium. The annual FLC Awards recognize significant accomplishments in transferring federal laboratory technologies to the marketplace.

FDA Guidance Fails to Ensure Security of 3D-Printed Masks and PPE

New Brunswick, N.J. (Sept. 16, 2020) – FDA guidelines for making 3D-printed masks, face shields and other personal protective equipment (PPE) in the COVID-19 era fail to defend against cyberattacks, according to Rutgers and Georgia Tech engineers. Due to the…

AI software enables real-time 3D printing quality assessment

Oak Ridge National Laboratory researchers have developed artificial intelligence software for powder bed 3D printers that assesses the quality of parts in real time, without the need for expensive characterization equipment.

Additive Manufacturing for COVID-19

A new Prospective article—Additive Manufacturing for COVID-19: Devices, Materials, Prospects and Challenges—published in MRS Communications, looks at these critical supply issues and provides an overview of 3D printing and how coupling the tools in additive manufacturing (AM) and advanced materials has provided a viable alternative for rapid production and distribution of PPEs and medical devices.

Magnum Venus Products licenses ORNL co-developed additive manufacturing technologies

The Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory has licensed two additive manufacturing-related technologies that aim to streamline and ramp up production processes to Knoxville-based Magnum Venus Products, Inc., a global manufacturer of fluid movement and product solutions for industrial applications in composites and adhesives.

Laser Inversion enables Multi-Materials 3D Printing

Selective laser sintering is one of the most widely used processes in additive manufacturing, but it is limited to printing with a single material at a time. Columbia engineers have used their expertise in robotics to develop a new approach to overcome this limitation: By inverting the laser so that it points upwards, they’ve invented a way to enable SLS to use—at the same time—multiple materials.

As ORNL builds novel reactor, nuclear industry benefits from technology

Scientists at DOE’s Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory working on the Transformational Challenge Reactor, a microreactor built using 3D printing, find their work may revolutionize manufacturing in the nuclear industry — and in other industries, too.

3D-printed nuclear reactor promises faster, more economical path to nuclear energy

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory are refining their design of a 3D-printed nuclear reactor core, scaling up the additive manufacturing process necessary to build it, and developing methods to confirm the consistency and reliability of its printed components.

Liquid metal research invokes ‘Terminator’ film — but much friendlier

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed “the first liquid metal lattice in the world.” The team has created a series of prototypes that return to their shapes when crushed.

Campus rallies to 3-D print protective medical gear

When representatives from Phelps Health, anticipating a shortage of protective masks due to the coronavirus outbreak, needed help, students, faculty and staff at Missouri S&T answered by harnessing the power of technology and ingenuity.Campus was abnormally quiet Saturday and Sunday, March 21-22, not only because it was the weekend before spring break but also because, due to the coronavirus outbreak, most students had moved out for the semester and a majority of faculty and staff prepared to work remotely.

Continuous soil fertility monitor could benefit agriculture

The ever-increasing price of fertilizers and environmental concerns about nutrient runoff make development of a rugged continuous electronic monitoring device to detect soil fertility a possible boon to agriculture in the United States and the United Kingdom (UK).

NSF CAREER Award research aims to transform metal casting for the 21st century

Guha Manogharan, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Penn State, is embarking on a new research project that has the potential to transform the fundamentals of casting science by studying 3D design principles through the introduction of 3D sand printing.

Could the next generation of particle accelerators come out of the 3D printer?

Imagine being able to manufacture complex devices whenever you want and wherever you are. It would create unforeseen possibilities even in the most remote locations, such as building spare parts or new components on board a spacecraft. 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, could be a way of doing just that.

Story Tips from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, December 2019

An additively manufactured polymer layer applied to specialized plastic proved effective to protect aircraft from lightning strikes in lab test; injecting shattered argon pellets into a super-hot plasma, when needed, could protect a fusion reactor’s interior wall from runaway electrons; ORNL will celebrate the life and legacy of Dr. Liane Russell on December 20.

Story tips from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, November 2019

ORNL and NREL took demonstrated a miniaturized gyroscope. ORNL created and tested new wireless charging designs. If humankind reaches Mars this century, an ORNL-developed experiment testing advanced materials for spacecraft may play a key role. ORNL and Georgia Tech found that critical interactions between microbes and peat moss break down under warming temperatures. ORNL and industry demonstrated that an additively manufactured hot stamping die can withstand up to 25,000 usage cycles.

Argonne’s Demo Day provides opportunity for entrepreneurs to showcase new innovations

Argonne National Laboratory’s Chain Reaction Innovations showcased their second cohort at Demo Day 2019 along with participants from the other two U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Manufacturing Office laboratory-embedded entrepreneurship programs.

Six degrees of nuclear separation

For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. From left to right: Peter Kozak, Andrew Breshears, M Alex Brown, co-authors of a recent Scientific Reports article detailing their breakthrough. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)

ORNL, University of Toledo to collaborate on advanced materials, manufacturing research for vehicle applications

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and The University of Toledo have entered into a memorandum of understanding for collaborative research into the advanced design and manufacturing of high-strength, intelligent, lightweight materials for use by the automotive sector.

New lattice designs defy conventional wisdom on metamaterials

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have designed a new class of 3D-printed lattice structures that combine light weight and high stiffness, despite breaking a rule previously thought to be required to exhibit such properties. One of the new structures additionally displays perfectly uniform response to forces in all directions.

Stretchable Wireless Sensor Could Monitor Healing of Cerebral Aneurysms

A wireless sensor small enough to be implanted in the blood vessels of the human brain could help clinicians evaluate the healing of aneurysms — bulges that can cause death or serious injury if they burst. The stretchable sensor, which operates without batteries, would be wrapped around stents or diverters implanted to control blood flow in vessels affected by the aneurysms.