Scientists discover ​“ripple” in flexible material that could improve electronic properties

Argonne scientists have discovered an intriguing new behavior in a two-dimensional material at the atomic level as it is stretched and strained, like it would be in an actual flexible device.

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Better Biosensor Technology Created for Stem Cells

A Rutgers-led team has created better biosensor technology that may help lead to safe stem cell therapies for treating Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and other neurological disorders. The technology, which features a unique graphene and gold-based platform and high-tech imaging, monitors the fate of stem cells by detecting genetic material (RNA) involved in turning such cells into brain cells (neurons), according to a study in the journal Nano Letters.

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EZ Select attracts undesirables to benefit biomanufacturing

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a highly selective adsorbent material called EZ Select to tackle inefficiencies in bioproduct extraction for biomanufacturing processes.

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3D-Printed Plastics With High Performance Electrical Circuits

Rutgers engineers have embedded high performance electrical circuits inside 3D-printed plastics, which could lead to smaller and versatile drones and better-performing small satellites, biomedical implants and smart structures. They used pulses of high-energy light to fuse tiny silver wires, resulting in circuits that conduct 10 times more electricity than the state of the art, according to a study in the journal Additive Manufacturing. By increasing conductivity 10-fold, the engineers can reduce energy use, extend the life of devices and increase their performance.

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Gordon Bell Finalist Team Tackles Transistors with New Programming Paradigm

A team simulated a 10,000-atom 2D transistor slice on the Summit supercomputer and mapped where heat is produced in a single transistor. Using a new data-centric version of the OMEN nanodevice simulator, the team sustained the code at 85.45 petaflops and earned a Gordon Bell Prize finalist nomination.

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Surface smarts

Chih-hung Chang, professor of chemical engineering at Oregon State University, manipulates nanostructure materials for a variety of applications, including more efficient solar cells; wearable technology that monitors health and warns of environmental dangers; and nanoparticle inks that print components of electric circuits, such as conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.

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Seeing sound: Scientists observe how acoustic interactions change materials at the atomic level

By using sound waves, scientists have begun to explore fundamental stress behaviors in a crystalline material that could form the basis for quantum information technologies.

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