Let’s get small: New Argonne method greatly improves X-ray nanotomography resolution

Using X-rays to study batteries and electronics at nanometer scales requires extremely high resolution. Argonne scientists led an effort to build a new instrument and devise a new algorithm to greatly improve the resolution for nanotomography.

Opening the gate to the next generation of information processing

Scientists have devised a means of achieving improved information processing with a new technology for effective gate operation. This technology has applications in classical electronics as well as quantum computing, communications and sensing.

People of Argonne’s history: A look at leaders who made Argonne what it is today

Since its founding, Argonne has employed and partnered with innovators whose contributions have dramatically pushed the frontiers of our understanding and improved the world.

Editors of MIT Technology Review name Argonne’s Jie Xu as a 2021 Innovator Under 35

The editors of MIT Technology Review have chosen Argonne’s Jie Xu as an Innovator Under 35 for 2021. She is one of only 35 innovators under the age of 35 named to this list. She is being recognized for her research on printable skin-like electronics.

DOE names six Argonne scientists to receive Early Career Research Program awards

Six Argonne scientists receive Department of Energy’s Early Career Research Program Awards.

Unveiling what governs crystal growth

Crystals are wonders of nature and science with important applications in electronics and optics. Scientists from Argonne have new insights into how gallium nitride crystals grow. Gallium nitride crystals are in wide use in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and may form transistors for high-power switching electronics to make electric grids more energy efficient and smarter.

Liquid-like motion in crystals could explain their promising behavior in solar cells

Scientists studied the inner workings of a solar cell material using X-ray and neutron scattering. The study revealed that liquid-like motion in the material may be responsible for their high efficiency in producing electric currents from solar energy.

5th cohort of five innovators selected for Chain Reaction Innovations program

Five new innovators will be joining Chain Reaction Innovations, the entrepreneurship program at Argonne National Laboratory, as part of the elite program’s fifth cohort to develop clean energy startups that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase U.S. competitiveness in emerging energy technologies.

Argonne’s 2021 Maria Goeppert Mayer Fellows bring new energy, promise to their fields

The Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory is proud to welcome five new FY21 Maria Goeppert Mayer Fellows to campus, each chosen for their incredible promise in their respective fields.

Scientists gain insight into recycling processes for nuclear and electronic waste

Scientists investigate a process that recycles nuclear and electronic waste materials to extend their lifetime and reduce expensive and invasive mining.

Tiny diamonds prove an excellent material for accelerator components

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have demonstrated a new material that has an excellent balance of parameters needed to generate a good accelerator beam.

Worth their salt: New battery anodes use salt for energy, stability

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California San Diego have discovered that a material that looks geometrically similar to rock salt could be an interesting candidate for lithium battery anodes that would be used in fast charging applications.

Getting the lead in

Researchers developed a low-cost, high-performance, sustainable lead-based anode for lithium-ion batteries that can power hybrid and all-electric vehicles. They also uncovered its previously unknown reaction mechanism during charge and discharge.

A glowing new prospect for self-reporting batteries

Argonne scientists have hit upon fluorescence as a way to shed light on what’s happening with flow batteries as they operate.

Do simulations represent the real world at the atomic scale?

A multidisciplinary research team has developed a strategy to validate computer simulations of oxide/water interfaces at the atomic scale using X-ray reflectivity experiments. Such interfaces are key in many energy applications.

Q&A with Junhong Chen: Argonne’s lead water strategist addresses questions on managing our precious water resources

Argonne’s Junhong Chen discusses how Argonne’s wide-ranging expertise combined with use of artificial intelligence and world-class research facilities can solve problems in water science and engineering.

Like a leaf – new ways to capture carbon from the air

Argonne National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will receive $4.5 million over three years for research aimed at capturing carbon dioxide directly from air and converting it to useful products by artificial photosynthesis.

Active learning accelerates redox-flow battery discovery

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, researchers are accelerating the hunt for the best possible battery components by employing artificial intelligence.

High-precision electrochemistry: The new gold standard in fuel cell catalyst development

As part of an international collaboration, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have made a pivotal discovery that could extend the lifetime of fuel cells that power electric vehicles by eliminating the dissolution of platinum catalysts.

Argonne scientists create water filtration membranes that can clean themselves

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory have designed a new, low-cost means to address membrane fouling through the application of a light-activated coating that can make the membrane self-cleaning.

The historical partnership that revolutionized battery research at Argonne

Argonne battery scientist Michael Thackeray highlights the ongoing research into manganese-based lithium-ion batteries, and how his work with Nobel Prize winner John B. Goodenough in the 80s has informed today’s studies.

Argonne and Sentient Science develop game-changing computer modeling program to improve discovery and design of new materials

Researchers collaborated to create a software program to accelerate discovery and design of new materials for applications allowing for a far more comprehensive understanding of materials from atomistic to mesoscopic scale than ever before.

Solving materials problems with a quantum computer

Scientists at Argonne and the University of Chicago have developed a method paving the way to using quantum computers to simulate realistic molecules and complex materials. They tested the method on a quantum simulator and IBM quantum computer.

New cathode coating extends lithium-ion battery life, boosts safety

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, in collaboration with Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, has developed a new particle-level cathode coating for lithium ion batteries meant to increase their life and safety.

Six Argonne researchers receive DOE Early Career Research Program awards

Argonne scientists Michael Bishof, Maria Chan, Marco Govini, Alessandro Lovato, Bogdan Nicolae and Stefan Wild have received funding for their research as part of DOE’s Early Career Research Program.

Platinum-free catalysts could make cheaper hydrogen fuel cells

Argonne scientists studied platinum-free catalysts for important fuel cell reactions. The research provides understanding of the mechanisms that make the catalysts effective, and it could inform production of more efficient and cost-effective catalysts.

Fourth cohort of 6 innovators selected for Chain Reaction Innovations program

Six new innovators will be joining Chain Reaction Innovations (CRI), the entrepreneurship program at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, as part of the elite program’s fourth cohort.

Capturing 3D microstructures in real time

Argonne researchers have invented a machine-learning based algorithm for quantitatively characterizing material microstructure in three dimensions and in real time. This algorithm applies to most structural materials of interest to industry.

Argonne’s Valerii Vinokur awarded Fritz London Prize

Valerii Vinokur, a senior scientist and distinguished fellow at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, has been awarded the Fritz London Memorial Prize for his work in condensed matter and theoretical physics.

A joint venture at the nanoscale

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory report fabricating and testing a superconducting nanowire device applicable to high-speed photon counting. This pivotal invention will allow nuclear physics experiments that were previously thought impossible.

Lin Chen receives Award in Experimental Physical Chemistry

The Physical Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society announces that Lin X. Chen has received the 2020 Award in Experimental Physical Chemistry. The award recognizes Chen for “fundamental contributions to the elucidation of excited state structures, dynamics and energetics of light harvesting systems.

Scientists pioneer new generation of semiconductor neutron detector

In a new study, scientists have developed a new type of semiconductor neutron detector that boosts detection rates by reducing the number of steps involved in neutron capture and transduction.