Unlocking the mystery behind the performance decline in a promising cathode material

Researchers at the Argonne National Laboratory have discovered the main reason why and how one of the more promising new cathode materials degrades with repeated cycling of lithium-ion batteries. The team’s new analysis method was key to the discovery.

Argonne engineers develop one-of-a-kind instruments and facilities for scientific discovery

A group of engineers at Argonne National Laboratory is uniquely equipped to design, model and install experimental systems that enable pioneering scientific research.

Argonne hosts See Yourself in STEAM event for students from groups underrepresented in STEM

Students from groups underrepresented in STEM discover world-class science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics at Argonne through See Yourself in STEAM event.

Argonne National Laboratory set to play pivotal role in realizing U.S. goals for nuclear science research

The Nuclear Science Advisory Committee recently unveiled its 2023 Long Range Plan for nuclear science. Argonne National Laboratory, with its world-class nuclear physics facilities and expertise, is poised to play a pivotal role in realizing the plan.

A revolution in the making

Argonne National Laboratory is shaping Industry 4.0 with groundbreaking research into advanced ways of making things more effective, efficient and economical, using the most cutting-edge materials and processes, with the lowest possible environmental impact.

Nina Andrejevic creates better tools to quickly characterize materials

Understanding big datasets requires better analytical models, says the Maria Goeppert Mayer Fellow.

Three Argonne scientists receive 2023 DOE Early Career Awards

Argonne researchers received three DOE Early Career Awards, which will help early-career researchers establish themselves as experts in their fields.

Argonne researchers receive funding to build research capacity at historically underrepresented institutions

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $37 million in funding for 52 projects to 44 institutions which include Argonne projects. The funding will help build research capacity, infrastructure and expertise at institutions historically underrepresented.

Midwest Integrated Center for Computational Materials renewed by U.S. Department of Energy

The U.S. Department of Energy has renewed the Midwest Integrated Center for Computational Materials. Its mission is to apply theoretical methods and software to the understanding, simulation and prediction of material properties at the atomic scale.

Scientists discover unusual ultrafast motion in layered magnetic materials

A team of researchers report a mechanical response across a layered magnetic material tied to changing its electron spin. This response could have important applications in nanodevices requiring ultra-precise and fast motion control.

Unveiling the quantum dance: Experiments reveal nexus of vibrational and electronic dynamics

Scientists have demonstrated experimentally a long-theorized relationship between electron and nuclear motion in molecules, which could lead to the design of materials for solar cells, electronic displays and other applications that can make use of this powerful quantum phenomenon.

How Argonne is pushing the boundaries of quantum technology research

With its Department of Energy National Quantum Information Science Research Center (Q-NEXT) and its quantum research team, Argonne is a hub for research that could change the way we process and transmit information.

Machine learning model speeds up assessing catalysts for decarbonization technology from months to milliseconds

Argonne researchers have developed an artificial intelligence-based model to greatly speed up the process for engineering a low-cost catalyst that converts biomass into fuels and useful chemicals with many possible applications.

Three Argonne researchers inducted into AAAS

John Mitchell, Valerie Taylor and Lisa Utschig were selected by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to be inducted as fellows.

Argonne announces 2022 Postdoctoral Performance Awards

Nine postdoctoral appointees were recognized with Postdoctoral Performance Awards.

Scientists turn single molecule clockwise or counterclockwise on demand

Argonne scientists report they can precisely rotate a single molecule on demand. The key ingredient is a single atom of europium, a rare earth element. It rests at the center of a complex of other atoms and gives the molecule many practical applications.

Designing better battery electrolytes

Argonne scientists give the lay of the land in the quest for electrolytes that could enable revolutionary battery chemistries.

Scientists use machine learning to accelerate materials discovery

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have recently demonstrated an automated process for identifying and exploring promising new materials by combining machine learning (ML) and high performance computing.

New cathode design solves major barrier to better lithium-ion batteries

New method for preparing cathode materials eliminates stumbling block to better lithium-ion batteries. New structure for cathode particles could lead to new generation of longer-lasting and safer batteries able to power vehicles for longer driving ranges.

Argonne scientist elected Fellow of the Electrochemical Society

Argonne’s Deborah Myers has been elected a Fellow of the Electrochemical Society. She is recognized for technological contributions to electrochemical and solid-state science and technology and for active membership and involvement in the Society.

Computer hardware mimics brain functions

A multi-institutional team, including Argonne National Laboratory, has developed a material with which computer chips can be designed to reconfigure their circuits when presented with new information. It does so by mimicking functions in the human brain.

Department of Energy names Argonne researchers to receive Early Career Research Program Awards

The Early Career Research Program Awards are a prestigious funding opportunity for early career researchers. Only 83 researchers have received funding of hundreds of applications, and only 27 of those are national laboratory researchers. Four scientists from Argonne have received funding.

Let’s get small: New Argonne method greatly improves X-ray nanotomography resolution

Using X-rays to study batteries and electronics at nanometer scales requires extremely high resolution. Argonne scientists led an effort to build a new instrument and devise a new algorithm to greatly improve the resolution for nanotomography.

Opening the gate to the next generation of information processing

Scientists have devised a means of achieving improved information processing with a new technology for effective gate operation. This technology has applications in classical electronics as well as quantum computing, communications and sensing.

People of Argonne’s history: A look at leaders who made Argonne what it is today

Since its founding, Argonne has employed and partnered with innovators whose contributions have dramatically pushed the frontiers of our understanding and improved the world.

Editors of MIT Technology Review name Argonne’s Jie Xu as a 2021 Innovator Under 35

The editors of MIT Technology Review have chosen Argonne’s Jie Xu as an Innovator Under 35 for 2021. She is one of only 35 innovators under the age of 35 named to this list. She is being recognized for her research on printable skin-like electronics.

DOE names six Argonne scientists to receive Early Career Research Program awards

Six Argonne scientists receive Department of Energy’s Early Career Research Program Awards.

Unveiling what governs crystal growth

Crystals are wonders of nature and science with important applications in electronics and optics. Scientists from Argonne have new insights into how gallium nitride crystals grow. Gallium nitride crystals are in wide use in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and may form transistors for high-power switching electronics to make electric grids more energy efficient and smarter.

Liquid-like motion in crystals could explain their promising behavior in solar cells

Scientists studied the inner workings of a solar cell material using X-ray and neutron scattering. The study revealed that liquid-like motion in the material may be responsible for their high efficiency in producing electric currents from solar energy.

5th cohort of five innovators selected for Chain Reaction Innovations program

Five new innovators will be joining Chain Reaction Innovations, the entrepreneurship program at Argonne National Laboratory, as part of the elite program’s fifth cohort to develop clean energy startups that will reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase U.S. competitiveness in emerging energy technologies.

Argonne’s 2021 Maria Goeppert Mayer Fellows bring new energy, promise to their fields

The Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory is proud to welcome five new FY21 Maria Goeppert Mayer Fellows to campus, each chosen for their incredible promise in their respective fields.

Scientists gain insight into recycling processes for nuclear and electronic waste

Scientists investigate a process that recycles nuclear and electronic waste materials to extend their lifetime and reduce expensive and invasive mining.

Tiny diamonds prove an excellent material for accelerator components

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have demonstrated a new material that has an excellent balance of parameters needed to generate a good accelerator beam.

Worth their salt: New battery anodes use salt for energy, stability

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and the University of California San Diego have discovered that a material that looks geometrically similar to rock salt could be an interesting candidate for lithium battery anodes that would be used in fast charging applications.

Getting the lead in

Researchers developed a low-cost, high-performance, sustainable lead-based anode for lithium-ion batteries that can power hybrid and all-electric vehicles. They also uncovered its previously unknown reaction mechanism during charge and discharge.

A glowing new prospect for self-reporting batteries

Argonne scientists have hit upon fluorescence as a way to shed light on what’s happening with flow batteries as they operate.

Do simulations represent the real world at the atomic scale?

A multidisciplinary research team has developed a strategy to validate computer simulations of oxide/water interfaces at the atomic scale using X-ray reflectivity experiments. Such interfaces are key in many energy applications.

Q&A with Junhong Chen: Argonne’s lead water strategist addresses questions on managing our precious water resources

Argonne’s Junhong Chen discusses how Argonne’s wide-ranging expertise combined with use of artificial intelligence and world-class research facilities can solve problems in water science and engineering.

Like a leaf – new ways to capture carbon from the air

Argonne National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will receive $4.5 million over three years for research aimed at capturing carbon dioxide directly from air and converting it to useful products by artificial photosynthesis.

Active learning accelerates redox-flow battery discovery

In a new study from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, researchers are accelerating the hunt for the best possible battery components by employing artificial intelligence.