Advancing Understanding of Heavy Elements at the Edge of the Periodic Table

Researchers have for the first time examined in detail a compound of einsteinium (Es). Einsteinium is one of the synthetic elements and is also the heaviest element currently available for classical chemistry studies. These experimental results chart the path to exploring the fundamental behavior of rare heavy elements and could lead to a new understanding of chemistry across the Periodic Table.

Do You Know the Way to Berkelium, Californium?

Scientists at Berkeley Lab have demonstrated how to image samples of heavy elements as small as a single nanogram. The new approach will help scientists advance new technologies for medical imaging and cancer therapies.

Scientists gain insight into recycling processes for nuclear and electronic waste

Scientists investigate a process that recycles nuclear and electronic waste materials to extend their lifetime and reduce expensive and invasive mining.

Discoveries at the Edge of the Periodic Table: First Ever Measurements of Einsteinium

Since element 99 – einsteinium – was discovered in 1952 at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study characterizing some of its properties, opening the door to a better understanding of the remaining transuranic elements of the actinide series.

Science Snapshots From Berkeley Lab

This edition of Science Snapshots highlights the discovery of an investigational cancer drug that targets tumors caused by mutations in the KRAS gene, the development of a new library of artificial proteins that could accelerate the design of new materials, and new insight into the natural toughening mechanism behind adult tooth enamel.

Six degrees of nuclear separation

For the first time, Argonne scientists have printed 3D parts that pave the way to recycling up to 97 percent of the waste produced by nuclear reactors. From left to right: Peter Kozak, Andrew Breshears, M Alex Brown, co-authors of a recent Scientific Reports article detailing their breakthrough. (Image by Argonne National Laboratory.)