Wayne State faculty member named president of the International Association for Great Lakes Research

The International Association for Great Lakes Research today announced its new board of directors and has named Donna Kashian, Ph.D., professor of biological sciences and director of environmental sciences in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Wayne State University, as president. Kashian previously served as vice president of the board.

Development of Durability Evaluation Technique Against Solar Variability for Advancing Green Hydrogen Production

Dr. Bora Seo’s research team from the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), led by Director Yoon Seok-jin, has developed a durability evaluation technique for green hydrogen production devices with step durations as short as one second, utilizing actual solar irradiance data.

Bar-Ilan University researchers develop cost-effective method to detect low concentrations of pharmaceutical waste and contaminants in water

Pharmaceutical waste and contaminants present a growing global concern, particularly in the context of drinking water and food safety. Addressing this critical issue, a new study by researchers at Bar-Ilan University’s Department of Chemistry and Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials has resulted in the development of a highly sensitive plasmonic-based detector, specifically targeting the detection of harmful piperidine residue in water.

The ties that bind

In a study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, WashU researchers discovered that a common mineral called goethite — an iron-rich mineral that is abundant in soils that cover the Earth — tends to incorporate trace metals into its structure over time, binding the metals in such a way that it locks them out of circulation.

Device ‘smells’ seawater to discover, detect novel molecules

Researchers in ACS Central Science report a proof-of-concept device that “sniffs” seawater, trapping dissolved compounds for analyses. The team showed that the system could easily concentrate molecules that are present in underwater caves and holds promise for drug discovery in fragile ecosystems, including coral reefs.

Argonne researchers to present cutting-edge work at SC23 conference

Argonne scientists recognized for use of exascale computing tools to achieve high-fidelity simulations of advanced nuclear reactor systems and high-resolution simulations that reduce uncertainty in climate model predictions.

Can a roof’s material cool the outside air and lower energy demand?

To help understand how climate is affecting urban communities, researchers at Argonne examined different types of roofing materials and their impact on near-surface temperature and cooling energy demand through regional modeling in the Chicago area.

Urban climate research project helps shape minority students’ science identity

An Urban Integrated Field Laboratory led by Argonne is focusing on creating a diverse next generation workforce and involving students in tackling future urban climate challenges.

$3M grant funds training to harness power of AI for social, environmental challenges

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is investing $3 million over the next five years in the Artificial Intelligence (AI) Advancements and Convergence in Computational, Environmental and Social Sciences (AI-ACCESS) program at Washington University in St. Louis.

Case Western Reserve University faculty available to discuss Hurricane Idalia, its impact and what to expect in its wake

https://thedaily.case.edu/what-can-we-expect-in-the-wake-of-hurricane-idalia-cwru-faculty-share-their-expertise/?utm_source=sfmc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=thedaily_expertinsights Tali Babila, assistant professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences Peter Shulman, the Elizabeth and Raymond Armington Professor and associate professor in the Department of History  Thomas King, professor and chair of the Department of Accountancy …

Department of Energy User Facility Launches Platform for Analyzing Biological and Environmental Research Data

The Department of Energy’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) has launched the Data Transformations Integrated Research Platform to help researchers transform their scientific data into more manageable sets of information, improve data accessibility and reproducibility, and facilitate the creation of models and visualization tools that help tell a larger story from the data.

Worsening wildfires have EMSL researchers looking for impact on soil, climate

Steven Allison, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Earth System Science, is using EMSL capabilities to uncover mysteries from the Earth beneath our feet. Allison explains how his research could help us understand severe events, like wildfire patterns, and how they affect soil microbiomes.

Submit proposal for research funding opportunity at EMSL, a Department of Energy scientific facility

The Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) is seeking biological and environmental science project proposals for the Fiscal Year 2024 Exploratory Research Call through 5 p.m. on Thursday, July 6.

New tools to combat Chicago’s changing climate

Argonne and Northeastern Illinois University launched instruments to measure Chicago’s changing climate. These sensors are the first for the Argonne-led Urban Integrated Field Laboratory called Community Research on Climate and Urban Science (CROCUS).

Water for the World: University of Rhode Island researchers available for interview

Access to safe water, proper sanitation and hygiene are essential for human survival. As the United Nations convenes its first major conference on water quality since 1977, researchers at the University of Rhode Island are seeking better ways to provide potable water and stop pollution from contaminating water supplies.

The Great Outdoor Classroom

Whitewater rafting down a river, trekking through the jungle, spotting wildlife in its natural habitat. While field studies courses offer students these kinds of adventurous experiences, they also give students a taste of life working in the field and hands-on learning that ensures they are job-ready for a career in research.

Argonne announces 2022 Postdoctoral Performance Awards

Nine postdoctoral appointees were recognized with Postdoctoral Performance Awards.

ComEd report shows how science and supercomputers help utilities adapt to climate change

Shifting climates are causing utility companies to take a closer look at the current and future power needs of their customers. Northern Illinois’ ComEd and Argonne National Laboratory used science to glimpse the future.

Improving Georgia land conservation through algorithms

A team of University of Georgia researchers has created a model to help land developers and public officials identify the land that is best suited for conservation. Led by Fabio Jose Benez-Secanho, a former UGA graduate student, and Puneet Dwivedi, associate professor in the Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources, this first-of-its-kind algorithm considers a variety of factors not included in other models when calculating the value of land for conservation.

A midge fly can be a source of currently used pesticides for birds, bats

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology have observed that non-biting midge larvae accumulate contemporary pesticides from polluted water and retain the substances into adulthood. As a result, animals that eat the adult flies could consume small amounts of pesticides daily.

Climate experts share insights in new report from Argonne’s America Resilient Conference

America Resilient proposed key ways to mitigate the degree of likely human suffering, loss of biodiversity, and disruptions to critical societal systems by building resilience and mitigating the effects of climate change in the United States.

Key to Carbon-Free Cars? Look to the Stars

In a decade-long quest, scientists at Berkeley Lab, the University of Hawaii, and Florida International University uncover new clues to the origins of the universe – and land new chemistry for cleaner combustion engines

To intervene or not to intervene? That is the future climate question

Nine of the hottest years in human history have occurred in the past decade. Without a major shift in this climate trajectory, the future of life on Earth is in question, which poses a new question: Should humans, whose fossil fueled society is driving climate change, use technology to put the brakes on global warming?

Michigan State University community ecologist Phoebe Zarnetske is co-lead of the Climate Intervention Biology Working Group, a team of internationally recognized experts in climate science and ecology that is bringing science to bear on the question and consequences of geoengineering a cooler Earth.

Under climate stress, human innovation set stage for population surge

Instead of a collapse amid dry conditions, development of agriculture and increasingly complex human social structures set the stage for a dramatic increase in human population in central plains of China around 3,900 to 3,500 years ago.

Humans’ construction ‘footprint’ on ocean quantified for first time

In a world-first, the extent of human development in oceans has been mapped. An area totalling approximately 30,000 square kilometres – the equivalent of 0.008 percent of the ocean – has been modified by human construction, a study led by Dr Ana Bugnot from the University of Sydney School of Life and Environmental Sciences and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science has found.

OU Receives $20 Million Grant to Lead Inaugural National Science Foundation Artificial Intelligence Institute

NSF recently announced an investment of more than $100 million to establish five AI Institutes to support research and education hubs nationwide. Amy McGovern, an OU professor with dual appointments in the School of Computer Science in the Gallogly College of Engineering and in the School of Meteorology in the College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, will lead the NSF AI Institute for Research on Trustworthy AI in Weather, Climate, and Coastal Oceanography, which received $20 million of the NSF funding.

FAU Awarded $2.2 Million to Monitor Harmful Algal Blooms in Lake Okeechobee

Researchers are developing a comprehensive sensing and information visualization package that will augment Florida’s existing monitoring programs for Lake Okeechobee, the second largest lake within the contiguous U.S. It will expand water, sediment, and biological measurements using innovative harmful algal bloom detection and environmental characterization technologies to allow pinpointing problem areas prior to or early on when harmful algal blooms are emerging in Lake Okeechobee. These harmful blooms are annual occurrences due to favorable environmental conditions.

Supercomputers Simulate Environmental Changes in Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) researchers used supercomputer simulations to examine impacts of both regional and global changes affecting the Chesapeake Bay. They discovered that historical increases in fertilizers and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have forced the bay to behave increasingly like a small sea on a continental shelf rather than a traditional estuary.