School of Physics Uses Moths and Origami Structures for Innovative Defense Research

Georgia Tech has received two Department of Defense (DoD) 2022 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) awards totaling almost $14 million. The highly competitive government program supports interdisciplinary teams of investigators developing innovative solutions in DoD interest areas. This year, the DoD awarded $195 million to 28 research teams across the country.

Key witness helps scientists detect ‘spooky’ quantum entanglement in solid materials

Quantum entanglement occurs when two particles appear to communicate without a physical connection, a phenomenon Albert Einstein famously called “spooky action at a distance.” Nearly 90 years later, a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory demonstrated the viability of a “quantum entanglement witness” capable of proving the presence of entanglement between magnetic particles, or spins, in a quantum material.

Department of Energy Invests $16 Million in Data-Intensive Scientific Machine Learning Research and Analysis

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $16 million for five collaborative research projects to develop artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) algorithms for enabling scientific insights and discoveries from data generated by computational simulations, experiments, and observations.

Automatically Steering Experiments Toward Scientific Discovery

Scientists at Brookhaven and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories have been developing an automated experimental setup of data collection, analysis, and decision making.

Sensing what plants sense: Integrated framework helps scientists explain biology and predict crop performance

Scientists have invested great time and effort into making connections between a crop’s genotype and its phenotype. But environmental conditions play a role as well. Iowa State University researchers untangle those complex interactions with the help of advanced data analytics in a newly published study.

Department of Energy to Provide $10 Million for Research on Data Reduction for Science

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $10 million for foundational research to address the challenges of managing and processing the increasingly massive data sets produced by today’s scientific instruments, facilities, and supercomputers in order to facilitate more efficient analysis.

WVU responds to data revolution with new major

The world is in the midst of a data revolution. From how we shop to how we vote and all decisions in between, there is a growing need for professionals trained to use modern data analysis to solve everyday problems. To meet these 21st century workforce demands, WVU is launching a new undergraduate data science major.

How many tests after vasectomy? Guideline update leads to change in practice

A change in evidence-based guidelines for vasectomy may have led to a reduction in the number of follow-up tests to confirm the procedure was successful, reports a study in Urology Practice®, an Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Four Rutgers Professors Named AAAS Fellows

Four Rutgers professors have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), an honor given to AAAS members by their peers. They join 485 other new AAAS fellows as a result of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. A virtual induction ceremony is scheduled for Feb. 13, 2021.

Next-gen bioinformatics tool enables big data analysis without programming expertise

A new data analysis tool developed by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center incorporates a user-friendly, natural-language interface to allow biomedical researchers without specialized expertise in bioinformatics or programming languages to conduct intuitive analysis of large datasets.

With Digital Phenotyping, Smartphones May Play a Role in Assessing Severe Mental Illness

Digital phenotyping approaches that collect and analyze Smartphone-user data on locations, activities, and even feelings – combined with machine learning to recognize patterns and make predictions from the data – have emerged as promising tools for monitoring patients with psychosis spectrum illnesses, according to a report in the September/October issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

BGSU’s Novak Family Professor of Data Science helps journalists understand polls

Being able to vet surveys and election polls is important for journalists and other media experts, making Dr. Trent Buskirk a very popular person this time of year. Buskirk is the Novak Family Professor of Data Science and the chair of the Applied Statistics and Operations Research Department at BGSU.

The University of Chicago is awarded a major federal contract to host a new COVID-19 medical imaging resource center

A new center hosted at the University of Chicago — co-led by the largest medical imaging professional organizations in the country — will help tackle the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic by curating a massive database of medical images to help better understand and treat the disease. The work is supported by a $20 million, two-year federal contract that could be renewable to $50 million over five years.

Countries Group into Clusters as COVID-19 Outbreak Spreads

Mathematicians based in Australia and China have developed a method to analyze the large amount of data accumulated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The technique, described in the journal Chaos, can identify anomalous countries — those that are more successful than expected at responding to the pandemic and those that are particularly unsuccessful. The investigators analyzed the data with a variation of a statistical technique known as a cluster analysis.

Modeling COVID-19 Data Must Be Done With Extreme Care

As the virus causing COVID-19 began its devastating spread, an international team of scientists was alarmed by the lack of uniform approaches by various countries’ epidemiologists. Data modeling to predict the numbers of likely infections varied widely and revealed a high degree of uncertainty. In the journal Chaos, the group describes why modeling and extrapolating the evolution of COVID-19 outbreaks in near real time is an enormous scientific challenge that requires a deep understanding of the nonlinearities underlying the dynamics of epidemics.

Researchers work on early warning system for COVID-19

To better understand early signs of coronavirus and the virus’ spread, physicians around the country and data scientists at UC San Diego are working together to use a wearable device to monitor more than 12,000 people, including thousands of healthcare workers. The effort has started at hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area and at the University of West Virginia.

New Software Tests Asphalt Performance More Efficiently

New Brunswick, N.J. (Feb. 26, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick researchers have created a software tool that more efficiently analyzes how asphalt performs, saving transportation agencies time and money. As performance testing for asphalt pavement has evolved, the focus has shifted…

New ORNL software improves neutron spectroscopy data resolution

Neutron spectroscopy is an important tool for studying magnetic and thermoelectric properties in materials. But often the resolution, or the ability of the instrument to see fine details, is too coarse to clearly observe features identifying novel phenomena in new advanced materials. To solve this problem, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, developed a new super-resolution software, called SRINS, that makes it easier for scientists to better understand materials’ dynamical properties using neutron spectroscopy.

Department of Energy Announces $21.4 Million for Quantum Information Science Research

The following news release was issued on Aug. 26, 2019 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It announces funding that DOE has awarded for research in quantum information science related to particle physics and fusion energy sciences. Scientists at DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory are principal investigators on two of the 21 funded projects.

Deep Learning Reveals Mysteries of Deep Space

The Science How do you determine the measurable “things” that describe the nature of our universe? To answer that question, researchers used CosmoFlow, a deep learning technique, running on a National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center supercomputer. They analyzed large,…