GeoLaB: Future with Geothermal Energy

Locally available, emission-free and baseload-capable: geothermal energy is an essential component of the energy transition. With GeoLaB, a new and unique underground research infrastructure, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) are looking to expedite research and prepare the technology for broad application. The facility is to be built in the Black Forest or the Odenwald range, with the Helmholtz Association providing 35 million euros in funding.

$2.3 million NIH grant to fund research on ’smart’ knee replacements

A researcher at Binghamton University, State University of New York has received a five-year, $2,326,521 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases to further her research into smart knee replacements.

Chula’s Faculty of Engineering Pioneers the Use of Gamma Rays to Inspect Large Trees

Lecturers of the Faculty of Nuclear Technology at the Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University have developed a special device for scanning trees to determine trunk density and hollowness to prevent accidents from fallen trees and also as a way to conserve large trees in urban areas.

My Wellness Check Goes Live for All Sylvester Cancer Patients, Providers

My Wellness Check, an electronic health record integrated symptom and practical-needs screening and referral system developed at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of UHealth – University of Miami Health System, went live for all Sylvester outpatients and providers on June 1.

Avatar against food waste

With the help of digital twins, researchers at Empa and Stellenbosch University are aiming to reduce food waste, for example in the case of citrus fruits, along the production and supply chains. The hygrothermal measurement data needed to improve the shelf life of oranges and the like would actually be available. So far, however, they have been underutilized, the researchers write in a recent study in the journal Nature Food.

CityU co-hosts online science and tech conference with Nature journals; pre launch for CityU’s HK Tech Forum

Leading scientists exchanged innovative views on contemporary trends in the chemistry of 2D materials at a three-day online conference co-organised by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Nature Conferences, the preeminent series curated by the highly prestigious science journal Nature and Nature journals.

Howard County, Johns Hopkins APL Join Forces to Leverage Smart City Innovation in Gateway District

APL is bringing its expertise in public health, artificial intelligence, autonomous systems and climate change into a collaboration with the Howard County Economic Development Authority to incorporate smart and connected community concepts within the county’s Gateway District.

The Clavius Project at SLUH Announces New Partnership with Saint Louis University

The Clavius Project announced a new partnership with Saint Louis University (SLU) made possible by a $612,000 grant from the Thomas R. Schilli Foundation (TRSF) to Saint Louis University. The grant will bring robotics and STEM enrichment programming into underserved schools across St. Louis through a partnership with SLU and its Ignatian Service Minor.

These stunning 3D models of coral reefs are a crucial research tool

Martínez Quintana has created stunning 3D digital models that visualize the surface of coral reefs in painstaking detail. The artful re-creations aren’t just beautiful: They’re also filled with data on the distribution of young corals, known as recruits, that scientists are analyzing.

STUDY WEIGHS THE RISKS OF CLIMATE GEOENGINEERING

To slow down the accelerating pace of climate change, scientists are working on radical geoengineering technologies like space mirrors, ocean iron fertilization, and cirrus cloud thinning to tweak the earth’s climate system. But a new study published in the journal Risk Analysis finds that none of these human interventions are risk free. Instead, “they merely shift risk or redistribute it,” says lead author Benjamin Sovacool, professor of energy policy at the University of Sussex Business School and a professor at Aarhus University and Boston University. “These risk tradeoffs must be evaluated if some of the more radical geoengineering technologies are to be deployed.”

Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Award

Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., has received a $1,103,081 NSF CAREER grant for a project that will build fundamental knowledge on where and when large shell-crushing predators feed in order to ensure a sustainable future for shellfish species. Further, the work can provide guidance to shellfish restoration programs that are currently “flying blind” with respect to predation risk.

The Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) Announces its Europe Conference Life Science and Technology Awards

A variety of scientific discovery and technology awards were presented during SLAS Europe 2021 Digital Conference and Exhibition, which took place June 23-25 online. The annual European forum of the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening bestowed the Ignite Award to the most promising new startup company, the New Product Award, SLAS Tony B. Academic Awards and Student Poster Awards.

Pivotal discovery of nanomaterial for LEDs

Perovskite nanocrystals have been prime candidates as a new material for LEDs but have proved unstable on testing. Scientists have discovered a method for stabilizing them, which have applications for consumer electronics, detectors and medical imaging.

Rutgers to Expand Entrepreneurship Training Programs for Researchers as Partner in New NSF I-Corps™ Hub: Northeast Region

As a key player in developing and transforming innovators into entrepreneurs that improve people’s lives, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey will expand its entrepreneurship training programming and further equip faculty and student researchers with the skills and strategy needed to transition their discoveries into technologies and products, as a partner in the newly created NSF I-Corps™ Hub: Northeast Region.

Do Passengers Want Self-driving Cars to Behave More or Less Like Them?

Researchers asked participants about their personal driving behaviors such as speed, changing lanes, accelerating and decelerating and passing other vehicles. They also asked them the same questions about their expectations of a self-driving car performing these very same tasks. The objective of the study was to examine trust and distrust to see if there is a relationship between an individual’s driving behaviors and how they expect a self-driving car to behave.

FAU Invention for Maximum Privacy of Sharing Files Online Gets U.S. Patent

While services such as Snapchat allow self-destructing messages or notify users when a recipient takes a screenshot of a message, there is no way to prevent someone from photographing or showing it to others on the screen. A new invention controls how and when shared documents are displayed and restricts individuals from viewing documents based on individual identity (e.g., face ID, a voice sample), their social network, and when and where the document is being viewed.

Appropriate Technologies: The COVID-19-Era Heroes Yet to Come to “Center Stage”

The COVID-19 outbreaks in Thailand have seen an ever-increasing number of infections as new clusters are emerging. The faculty members of Sasin School of Management — Prof. Dr. Kua Wongboonsin, Asst. Prof. Dr. Piyachart Phiromswad, Assoc. Prof. Dr. Pattanaporn Chatjuthamard, Asst. Prof. Dr. Pattarake Sarajoti, and Asst. Prof. Dr. Sabin Srivannaboon, with financial support from the National Research Council of Thailand (NRCT), jointly present ways to reduce the spread of COVID-19 sustainably in a study to identify technologies that can instantly and appropriately help professionals who find social distancing difficult.