UC Davis Health and Illuminate implement abdominal aortic aneurysm surveillance program

UC Davis Health and AI software company Illuminate have developed a centralized abdominal aortic aneurysm surveillance program using artificial intelligence software. The effort identifies at-risk abdominal aortic aneurysm patients who may have been ‘lost-to-follow-up’ either due to COVID-19 or other factors.

UCI School of Social Ecology welcomes Andrew Yang for “Leading the Change Distinguished Speaker Series”

EVENT:  The School of Social Ecology at the University of California, Irvine, welcomes Andrew Yang for its “Leading the Change Distinguished Speaker Series.” The businessman, attorney, lobbyist, political candidate and co-founder of the Forward Party will speak on “Technology, Democracy and the Future.” Event is free and open to the public, but registration is required here: https://socialecology.

UCI study finds 53 percent jump in e-waste greenhouse gas emissions between 2014, 2020

Greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere from electronic devices and their associated electronic waste increased by 53 percent between 2014 and 2020, including 580 metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2020 alone, according to University of California, Irvine researchers.

Joining Forces: Fast-as-lightning 3D Microprinting with Two Lasers

Printing objects from plastic precisely, quickly, and inexpensively is the goal of many 3D printing processes. However, speed and high resolution remain a technological challenge. A research team from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Heidelberg University, and the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) has come a long way toward achieving this goal. It developed a laser printing process that can print micrometer-sized parts in the blink of an eye. The international team published the work in Nature Photonics. (DOI: 10.1038/s41566-022-01081-0)

UCI and national lab researchers develop a cobalt-free cathode for lithium-ion batteries

Irvine, Calif., Sept. 21, 2022 – Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and four national laboratories have devised a way to make lithium-ion battery cathodes without using cobalt, a mineral plagued by price volatility and geopolitical complications. In a paper published today in Nature, the scientists describe how they overcame thermal and chemical-mechanical instabilities of cathodes composed substantially of nickel – a common substitute for cobalt – by mixing in several other metallic elements.

Binghamton University-led battery initiative wins $113 million to bolster domestic battery manufacturing and supply chain, reinvigorate region

Binghamton University’s New Energy New York project has been awarded more than $113 million to establish a hub for battery technology innovation in upstate New York. The U.S. Economic Development Administration announced Friday that the region would receive $63.7 million; the State of New York will support the project with an additional $50 million.

Pitt is the only university in the U.S. with this giant 3D printer for metal

The University of Pittsburgh is in exclusive company with a new state-of-the-art technology — the first Gefertec arc605 3D printer at any university in the U.S, thanks to funding from the Department of Energy and U.S. Army. The printer makes use of welding, melting wire made from metals like stainless steel, titanium and aluminum alloys and depositing it layer by layer. Pitt’s new Gefertec arc605 is much faster than previous metal 3D printers, which used lasers and metal powder.

Cedars-Sinai Ranked #2 Hospital in Nation by U.S. News & World Report

Cedars-Sinai has been named the #2 hospital in the nation and #1 in California in U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Hospitals 2022-23” rankings.

Life Gets Easier with ReadMe Program that Digitizes Documents and Images Developed Right Here in Thailand

A team from Chula’s Faculty of Engineering have made use of AI Deep Tech to develop a program that scans documents and images into OCR documents. The program is more than 90% accurate when reading Thai scripts and Chula’s UTC is now ready for a spin-off to the market through Eikonnex AI Co. Ltd.

UCI researchers invent a health monitoring wearable that operates without a battery

Irvine, Calif., July 12, 2022 – A new self-powered, wristwatch-style health monitor invented by researchers at the University of California, Irvine can keep track of a wearer’s pulse and wirelessly communicate with a nearby smartphone or tablet – without needing an external power source or a battery. In a paper published recently in the journal Nano Energy, team members in UCI’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering describe their invention, built via 3D printing of nanomaterials on flexible substrates for real-time and wireless monitoring of vital signs.

GeoLaB: Future with Geothermal Energy

Locally available, emission-free and baseload-capable: geothermal energy is an essential component of the energy transition. With GeoLaB, a new and unique underground research infrastructure, the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) are looking to expedite research and prepare the technology for broad application. The facility is to be built in the Black Forest or the Odenwald range, with the Helmholtz Association providing 35 million euros in funding.

$2.3 million NIH grant to fund research on ’smart’ knee replacements

A researcher at Binghamton University, State University of New York has received a five-year, $2,326,521 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases to further her research into smart knee replacements.

Chula’s Faculty of Engineering Pioneers the Use of Gamma Rays to Inspect Large Trees

Lecturers of the Faculty of Nuclear Technology at the Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University have developed a special device for scanning trees to determine trunk density and hollowness to prevent accidents from fallen trees and also as a way to conserve large trees in urban areas.

My Wellness Check Goes Live for All Sylvester Cancer Patients, Providers

My Wellness Check, an electronic health record integrated symptom and practical-needs screening and referral system developed at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of UHealth – University of Miami Health System, went live for all Sylvester outpatients and providers on June 1.

Avatar against food waste

With the help of digital twins, researchers at Empa and Stellenbosch University are aiming to reduce food waste, for example in the case of citrus fruits, along the production and supply chains. The hygrothermal measurement data needed to improve the shelf life of oranges and the like would actually be available. So far, however, they have been underutilized, the researchers write in a recent study in the journal Nature Food.

CityU co-hosts online science and tech conference with Nature journals; pre launch for CityU’s HK Tech Forum

Leading scientists exchanged innovative views on contemporary trends in the chemistry of 2D materials at a three-day online conference co-organised by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) and Nature Conferences, the preeminent series curated by the highly prestigious science journal Nature and Nature journals.

Howard County, Johns Hopkins APL Join Forces to Leverage Smart City Innovation in Gateway District

APL is bringing its expertise in public health, artificial intelligence, autonomous systems and climate change into a collaboration with the Howard County Economic Development Authority to incorporate smart and connected community concepts within the county’s Gateway District.

The Clavius Project at SLUH Announces New Partnership with Saint Louis University

The Clavius Project announced a new partnership with Saint Louis University (SLU) made possible by a $612,000 grant from the Thomas R. Schilli Foundation (TRSF) to Saint Louis University. The grant will bring robotics and STEM enrichment programming into underserved schools across St. Louis through a partnership with SLU and its Ignatian Service Minor.

These stunning 3D models of coral reefs are a crucial research tool

Martínez Quintana has created stunning 3D digital models that visualize the surface of coral reefs in painstaking detail. The artful re-creations aren’t just beautiful: They’re also filled with data on the distribution of young corals, known as recruits, that scientists are analyzing.

STUDY WEIGHS THE RISKS OF CLIMATE GEOENGINEERING

To slow down the accelerating pace of climate change, scientists are working on radical geoengineering technologies like space mirrors, ocean iron fertilization, and cirrus cloud thinning to tweak the earth’s climate system. But a new study published in the journal Risk Analysis finds that none of these human interventions are risk free. Instead, “they merely shift risk or redistribute it,” says lead author Benjamin Sovacool, professor of energy policy at the University of Sussex Business School and a professor at Aarhus University and Boston University. “These risk tradeoffs must be evaluated if some of the more radical geoengineering technologies are to be deployed.”

Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., Receives Prestigious NSF CAREER Award

Matt Ajemian, Ph.D., has received a $1,103,081 NSF CAREER grant for a project that will build fundamental knowledge on where and when large shell-crushing predators feed in order to ensure a sustainable future for shellfish species. Further, the work can provide guidance to shellfish restoration programs that are currently “flying blind” with respect to predation risk.