JMIR Perioperative Medicine | COVID-19–Related Backlog: Operating Room Ramp-Up

JMIR Publications recently published “A Canadian Weekend Elective Pediatric Surgery Program to Reduce the COVID-19–Related Backlog: Operating Room Ramp-Up After COVID-19 Lockdown Ends—Extra Lists (ORRACLE-Xtra) Implementation Study” in JMIR Perioperative Medicine which reported that a decrease in surgical services led to substantial backlogs for time-sensitive scheduled pediatric patients.

New commentary paper highlights costs of defects in surgical care and calls for elimination of defects in value

A commentary, published in the Nov. 3 issue of the journal NEJM Catalyst Innovations in Care Delivery, highlights how defects in surgical care could be diminished or eliminated for the benefit of patients and to lower costs in American health care spending.
Using colorectal surgery to provide examples and national estimates of the costs of defects in surgical care, the paper summarizes a holistic approach to eliminating defects in surgical care and offers a framework for centers of excellence for removing them. The paper estimates that defects in colorectal surgery cost the American health care system more than $12 billion. The authors discuss eight areas (or domains) of defects that waste money and/or contribute to lower value in care for colorectal surgery patients.

Did your plastic surgeon really turn back the clock? Artificial intelligence may be able to quantify how young you actually look after facelift surgery

For most patients, the reasons for having a facelift are simple: to “turn back the clock” for a younger and more attractive appearance. Even during the pandemic year 2020, more than 234,000 patients underwent facelift surgery, according to American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) statistics.

Providing more low-value care doesn’t lead to higher patient experience ratings

Many healthcare providers and policy makers fear that increased pressure to please patients — and ensure high satisfaction ratings as a result — could lead to overuse of low-value care that doesn’t provide any clinical benefit while unnecessarily ratcheting up medical bills. But new research from the University of Chicago and Harvard Medical School may alleviate some of those concerns.

Telemedicine versus office-based follow-up after meniscal surgery: Trial shows ‘equivalent’ patient satisfaction scores

After arthroscopic surgery on the meniscus of the knee, patients using telemedicine for postoperative follow-up are just as satisfied with their care as those making in-person visits, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

Financial distress associated with breast cancer surgery negatively impacts psychological well-being of patients

Financial toxicity among breast cancer patients is independently associated with worse psychological well-being following a mastectomy or lumpectomy operation. However, even small improvements in financial pressure associated with treatment-related costs can lead to better mental well-being and higher patient satisfaction with breast reconstruction.

Anorexia Nervosa Treatment: Patients Tolerate Rapid Weight Gain With Meal-Based Behavioral Support

A new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers of adults hospitalized for the eating disorder anorexia nervosa has strengthened the case for promoting rapid weight gain as part of overall efforts for a comprehensive treatment plan. The study findings, after analyzing data regarding 149 adult inpatients with anorexia nervosa in the Johns Hopkins Eating Disorders Program, stand in contrast to long held beliefs that patients would not tolerate a faster weight gain plan because it would be too traumatic.

Rush System Leads The Way in Age-Friendly Care

After Rush University Medical Center was designated as an Age-Friendly Health System, the American Hospital Association developed a case study that took a deep dive into the Rush Center for Excellence in Aging and its successful impact on older adult health care.

New Tool Collects Patient Feedback Faster During Hospital Stays

Seeking to improve patient’s experiences in the hospital, Cedars-Sinai has introduced a new feedback tool that will allow patients to comment on their hospital stays in real time rather than waiting to complete surveys after going home. Under a program that began in January, patients can evaluate their experiences through a platform designed in conjunction with Feedtrail, a healthcare technology company.