Universal right to health could inspire people, organizations to make real change

Acknowledging health as a universal human right could galvanize people and organizations to make major improvements in health worldwide, according to new research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

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Effect of Continuous Glucose Monitoring on Hypoglycemia in Older Adults With Type 1 Diabetes

Fewer than one in five adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes are successful in achieving the recommended 2019 A1C goal of below 7.5%, and the overwhelming majority fail to achieve the 2020 target of less than 7%. But young people who use continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices can significantly improve their overall blood glucose control, without increasing severe low or high glucose levels, according to findings from a 6-month, multi-center clinical trial. And both severe hypoglycemia (low glucose) and hyperglycemia (high glucose) can lead to emergency care and hospitalization.

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Experts available to comment on racial and social inequality in COVID-19 health care

As all 50 U.S. states ease economic restrictions implemented in response to the coronavirus, health and policy experts are braced for a potential second wave of COVID-19. Based on the first phase of the crisis, the hardest-hit populations are anticipated among communities of color, which have been disproportionally affected. According to a recent report from American Public Media Research Lab, African Americans are more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19 as Latino or Asian Americans, and nearly 2 1/2 times as likely as whites. Indiana University experts on racial inequality, social inequality in health care and demographics data are available to comment on these topics.

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Viewing COVID-19 through the lens of data science

Multidisciplinary study of the COVID-19 pandemic and its wide-ranging impact has become an urgent endeavor worldwide. To further and deepen global understanding of the crisis, the Harvard Data Science Review (an open access platform of the Harvard Data Science Initiative) is publishing a special issue examining the novel coronavirus and its impact through the lens of data science.

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Toward a low-cost, low-power wearable sensor for temperature and respiration

Engineers at the University of California San Diego are developing low-cost, low-power wearable sensors that can measure temperature and respiration–key vital signs used to monitor COVID-19. The devices would transmit data wirelessly to a smartphone, and could be used to monitor patients for viral infections that affect temperature and respiration in real time. The research team plans to develop a device and a manufacturing process in just 12 months.

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