Novel Therapeutic Strategies May Finally Bring Relief to Those Suffering from Asthma and Allergies

Asthma and allergies are chronic health conditions that continue to adversely impact the quality of life for many around the world. Thanks to exciting breakthroughs by Mark Siracusa, a researcher at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, there may be early signs of light at the end of the tunnel.

Increased use of household fireworks creates a public health hazard, UCI study finds

Irvine, Calif., June 29, 2021 – Fireworks are synonymous in the United States with the celebration of Independence Day and other special events, but the colorful displays have caused a growing risk to public safety in recent years, according to a study by environmental health researchers at the University of California, Irvine.

In Utero Exposure to Tiny Pollution Particles in the Air Is Linked to Asthma in Preschoolers, Study Shows

Women who were highly exposed to ultra-fine particles in air pollution during their pregnancy were more likely to have children who developed asthma, according to a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine in May. This is the first time asthma has been linked with prenatal exposure to this type of air pollution, which is named for its tiny size and which is not regulated or routinely monitored in the United States.

Family History, Race and Sex Linked to Higher Rates of Asthma in Children

A national study on childhood asthma led by Henry Ford Health System has found that family history, race and sex are associated in different ways with higher rates of asthma in children.

In a study published in JAMA Pediatrics (hyperlink goes here), researchers found that children with at least one parent with a history of asthma had two to three times higher rates of asthma, mostly through age 4.

Mouse Study Suggests Androgens and Their Receptors Play Important and Positive Role in Asthma

Article title: Androgen receptor activation alleviates airway hyperresponsiveness, inflammation and remodeling in a murine model of asthma Authors: Rama Satyanarayana Raju Kalidhindi, Nilesh Sudhakar Ambhore, Premanand Balraj, Taylor Schmidt, M. Nadeem Khan, Venkatachalem Sathish From the authors: “Overall, our findings from…

As Wildfires Increase in Severity, Experts Call for Coordinated Federal Response;

In advance of a wildfire season projected to be among the worst, the American Thoracic Society has released a report that calls for a unified federal response to wildfires that includes investment in research on smoke exposure and forecasting, health impacts of smoke, evaluation of interventions, and a clear and coordinated communication strategy to protect public health.

UChicago Medicine’s community benefit investment totals $567.1 million in fiscal 2020

The UChicago Medicine health system provided $567.1 million in community benefits and services to the South Side, and UChicago Medicine Ingalls Memorial provided $89.5 million to Harvey and nearby areas.

Genetic Ancestry Versus Race Can Provide Specific, Targeted Insights to Predict and Treat Many Diseases

The complex patterns of genetic ancestry uncovered from genomic data in health care systems can provide valuable insights into both genetic and environmental factors underlying many common and rare diseases, according to a team of Mount Sinai researchers.

Coal-fired power plant closures tied to fewer asthma ER visits for kids

Sarah Komisarow is an Assistant Professor of Public Policy and Economics at the Sanford School of Public Policy at Duke University.  She is an applied microeconomist with research interests in public policies that affect children’s health and education.  Her work…

During pandemic, potentially avoidable hospitalizations for non-COVID conditions fell more among whites

New research suggests that the COVID-19 crisis has exacerbated existing racial health care disparities and that during the pandemic, African Americans may have had worse access than whites to outpatient care that could have helped prevent deterioration of their non–COVID-19 health conditions

New strategy blocks chronic lung disease in mice

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has uncovered a previously unknown role for exosomes in inflammatory respiratory diseases. The study has implications for finding new therapies. Exosomes are tiny compartments released from cells that carry different types of cargo, including inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that can drive lung disease.

Health Disparities and COVID-19, Toxicity of E-cigarette Generated Aerosols, and More Featured in February 2021 Toxicological Sciences

Toxicological Sciences continues to feature leading toxicology research in the areas of developmental and reproductive toxicology; endocrine toxicology; neurotoxicology; molecular, biochemical, and systems toxicology; and more.

Study finds antibiotics before age 2 associated with childhood health issues

In a retrospective case study, Mayo Clinic researchers have found that antibiotics administered to children younger than 2 are associated with several ongoing illnesses or conditions, ranging from allergies to obesity. The findings appear in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

Antibiotic Exposure in Children Under Age 2 Associated with Chronic Conditions

Children under age 2 who take antibiotics are at greater risk for childhood-onset asthma, respiratory allergies, eczema, celiac disease, obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a paper written jointly by Mayo Clinic and Rutgers researchers. While previous studies have looked at the association of antibiotics with single diseases, this is the first to look at the association across many diseases.

Show Rates for Asthma Visits During COVID-19 Increased Thanks to Telemedicine

A new study being presented at this year’s virtual ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting reveals that “show rates” for children with asthma – how often parents brought their kids to an appointment rather than being a “no show” – increased with the use of telemedicine during four months of the pandemic.

The Hidden Reason Children Born by C-Section Are More Likely to Develop Asthma

Researchers at Rutgers University, the Copenhagen Prospective Studies on Asthma in Childhood and the University of Copenhagen have described for the first time how delivery by caesarean section interferes with a baby’s ability to obtain beneficial germs from the mother’s microbiome, and how this can lead to early childhood asthma.

Proactive Steps Linked To Reduced Medical Costs, Hospital Visits for Children With Asthma

A new study looking at data from tens of thousands of children with asthma finds that several widely available interventions are associated with both reduced medical costs and a reduced likelihood that the children will need to visit an emergency room or stay in the hospital.

ATS Research Program, 4DMedical Announce Grant Opportunities for Research in Asthma, COPD and IPF

Today, the ATS Research Program announced three research grant opportunities with support from 4DMedical, a global medical technology company with a focus on lung health. With a total grant support of $150,000, each of the three $50,000 grants will fund research in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder or COPD, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or IPF.

Asthma May Not Be a Significant Risk Factor for Severe COVID-19 or COVID-Related Intubation

A new research letter published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines whether asthma is a significant risk factor for developing COVID-19 that is severe enough to warrant hospitalization and intubation. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals with asthma are at higher risk for hospitalization and other severe effects from COVID-19, similar to the elevated risk from such health conditions as obesity, hypertension and diabetes.