Case Western Reserve-led research team aims to determine which diabetic individuals can successfully donate corneas for transplant (and which should not)

In a new study, supported by a five-year, $6.4 million grant from the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health, researchers from Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals and the Jaeb Center for Health Research, aim to finally determine which diabetic individuals can successfully donate their corneas for keratoplasty (and which should not).

Case Western Reserve researchers identify potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University have identified a potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures. Lin Mei, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosciences at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, who led the new study in mouse models, said the team found a new chemical reaction that could help control epileptic seizures.

Ultra-high field MRI detects subtle differences in structure and function of brain’s ‘hippocampus’ in people with Down syndrome

Using ultra-high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to map the brains of people with Down syndrome (DS), researchers from Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals and other institutions detected subtle differences in the structure and function of the hippocampus—a region of the brain tied to memory and learning.

Case Western Reserve University biotech startup Rodeo Therapeutics Corp. sold to Amgen Inc.

Rodeo Therapeutics Corp., a drug-development startup founded by two leading researchers from the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and a third scientific partner, has been sold to Amgen Inc., a publicly traded international biopharmaceutical company.

Under terms of the agreement, Amgen, based in Thousand Oaks, California, will acquire all outstanding shares of Rodeo for $55 million, plus “future contingent milestone payments potentially worth up to an additional $666 million in cash,” the companies announced today. Total consideration to Rodeo stakeholders could potentially be worth up to $721 million in cash.

New study provides insights into architecture of abnormal protein deposits in brain disorders

Scientists at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have determined the structure of protein “fibrils” linked to Lou Gehrig’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders—findings that provide clues to how toxic proteins clump and spread between nerve cells in the brain.

International team of bioethicists and scientists suggests revisiting 14-day limit on human embryo research for potential health and fertility benefits

An international team of bioethicists and scientists, led by a researcher at Case Western Reserve University, contends it may be justified to go beyond the standing 14-day limit that restricts how long researchers can study human embryos in a dish. Going beyond this policy limit could lead to potential health and fertility benefits, and the authors provide a process for doing so.

Researchers Identify Muscle Factor that Controls Fat Metabolism

In a recent study, published in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, University Hospitals (UH) Cleveland Medical Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine researchers have found that skeletal muscle significantly affects how the body stores and metabolizes fat.

Case Western Reserve researchers uncover biochemical rules between RNA-protein interactions and expression of thousands of genes

A team of Case Western Reserve University researchers has found a way to measure key characteristics of proteins that bind to RNA in cells—a discovery that could improve our understanding of how gene function is disturbed in cancer, neurodegenerative disorders or infections.

Researchers Discover Neuroprotective Treatment for Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of cognitive impairment that affects millions of people worldwide. Despite growing awareness about the debilitating and lifelong progressive consequences of TBI, there are currently no treatments that slow the deteriorative process. TBI survivors are currently treated with extensive physical and cognitive rehabilitation, accompanied by medications that may mitigate symptoms yet do not halt or slow neurodegeneration. Now, researchers have found for the first time that this process can be pharmacologically reversed in an animal model of this chronic health condition, offering an important proof of principle in the field and a potential path to new therapy.

Global first in mixed-reality education during COVID-19 pandemic

The developers of Case Western Reserve University’s signature HoloAnatomy mixed-reality software for the Microsoft HoloLens knew they were likely achieving a global first this Spring when they quickly pivoted to the first-ever, all-remote anatomy course when the COVID-19 pandemic kept 185 first-year medical students from coming to campus.
Now, they have data reporting that an overwhelming majority of those students across the U.S. and Canada not only preferred the remote course, but believe they can effectively learn anatomy via the mixed-reality application.

NIH Funds Research into Differences in Glioblastoma between Males and Females

A team led by researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute has secured $10.4 million over five years from the National Institutes of Health/National Cancer Institute to explore at the molecular level the differences in glioblastoma between males and females.

Case Western Reserve researchers to lead Northeast Ohio initiative to prevent, detect and treat lung cancer in underserved communities

With a $2.75 million, three-year grant from the Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) Foundation, researchers from Case Western Reserve University will lead a community wide initiative to create and apply innovative methods to prevent and detect lung cancer in underserved residents in Northeast Ohio.

Case Western Reserve University researchers discover critical link to controlling inflammation in Crohn’s disease

Investigators at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine discovered that blocking interleukin-1α (IL1α), a protein that controls inflammation in the gut, markedly decreases the severity of intestinal inflammation in a mouse model of Crohn’s disease (CD).

Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Infectious Diseases Researcher Awarded NIH Contract to Accelerate TB Vaccine Development

CWRU’s W. Henry Boom, MD, and a team of collaborators nationally received the first installment of a seven-year contract, totaling $30 million in its first year from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the NIH, to establish three immunology research centers to accelerate TB vaccine development.

Genetic Data Now Available for Bacteria Central to Crohn’s Disease

Scientists have made genetic data publicly available for bacteria that might be lurking inside the gut walls of patients chronically affected with severe Crohn’s disease.

By studying a surgically removed, damaged bowel from a patient, researchers were able to culture bacteria from a special form of microscopic lesions that they earlier discovered and that can be present within the gut wall of the inflamed bowel in Crohn’s disease. After growing the bacteria in their laboratory, they chose one representative species, and performed a complete genome sequence analysis that could hold clues into how the slow and damaging microlesions form.

A New Pathway: Researchers Identify Potential Treatment Target for Crohn’s Disease

There is no cure for the more than 1.6 million people in the United States living with Crohn’s disease (CD) and its symptoms, including abdominal pain, intestinal distress and severe weight-loss. CD is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in which the body’s own immune system attacks the gastrointestinal tract, and treatment is focused on controlling the symptoms of the disease in its acute phase and managing it in remission. But recently, researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine identified a pathway in the immune system activated in CD and which holds promise for investigating new treatments.