Gene Mutation Leading to Autism Found to Overstimulate Brain Cells

Scientists looking to understand the fundamental brain mechanisms of autism spectrum disorder have found that a gene mutation known to be associated with the disorder causes an overstimulation of brain cells far greater than that seen in neuronal cells without the mutation.

The Rutgers-led study, spanning seven years, employed some of the most advanced approaches available in the scientific toolbox, including growing human brain cells from stem cells and transplanting them into mouse brains.

Landmark Study of Biomarker Data May Enable Better Treatment for Early Onset Dementia

In a study publishing in Nature Medicine on September 22, 2022, University of California San Francisco researchers Adam Staffaroni, PhD, and Adam Boxer, MD, PhD, combined and harmonized clinical, neuroimaging, and fluid biomarkers from nearly all familial FTD clinical research participants across North America and Europe. With that data, they developed models of clinical and biomarker dynamics to determine the temporal sequence of biomarker and clinical changes in f-FTD before disease progression begins.

Investigators Uncover Cellular Pathway Involved in Cancer Growth

A hallmark of cancer is its ability to replicate, a process commonly driven by the reactivation of the telomerase enzyme complex, which helps prevent the aging and death of healthy cells and keeps stem cells in bone marrow and the intestines from producing normal cells in those organs. When telomerase is activated in cancer cells, it helps them survive and duplicate in the body.

Are Heavy Metals Toxic? Scientists Find Surprising New Clues in Yeast

Scientists at Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley have compiled the most complete library yet of lanthanide heavy metals and their potential toxicity – by exposing baker’s yeast to lanthanides. Their findings could help researchers uncover hidden pathways between lanthanide metals and disease.

Lung cancer trial of RET inhibitor selpercatinib achieves durable responses in majority of patients with RET gene fusions

For patients with non-small cell lung cancers marked by RET gene fusions, the targeted therapy selpercatinib was well tolerated and achieved durable objective responses, or tumor shrinkage, in the majority of patients in a Phase I/II trial.