Systemic Racism & Health Care: Building Black Confidence in the COVID-19 Vaccine

The Tuskegee syphilis experiment. The secret sale of Henrietta Lacks cancer research cells. Jim Crow laws affecting African Americans’ ability to receive medical treatment. For weeks, it’s been hard to hear over the clamor of millions of Americans lining up for COVID-19 vaccines. But not everyone has been enthused — namely, large swaths of minority communities, which comprise the populations disproportionately impacted by the virus, but whose hesitance is largely fueled by the country’s racist medical past.

Black History Month is important to a world hurting from racial injustices, pandemic

February is Black History Month when the contributions, customs and achievements of African Americans are celebrated. But as the country deals with racial injustice and civil unrest, these 28 days take on greater importance, says Earl Lewis, University of Michigan professor of history and Afroamerican and African studies and director of the U-M Center for Social Solutions.

Study: Why U.S. Black Entrepreneurship Lags & How Banks Can Help Fix It

A steady stream of media reports detailing the deaths of unarmed Black Americans at the hands of police. False 911 calls aimed at bringing harm to African Americans engaged in innocuous, everyday activities. Street protests calling for an end to discrimination and police brutality.  As racial tensions swirled this summer, so did calls on social media for those who support the social justice movement for African American civil rights to amplify Black voices and support Black businesses.

United States should implement nationwide truth commission on police violence against Black people

The United States needs to implement a nationwide truth commission on police violence against Black people, according to Kerry Whigham, assistant professor of genocide and mass atrocity prevention at Binghamton University, State University of New York. “If recent instances of…

Tearing down statues won’t end structural racism

Confederate monuments are being torn down across the United States as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd continue. While the Confederate statues represent a step backwards, tearing them down will not end structural racism, says Anne Bailey,…

Civil rights scholar available to discuss racism, George Floyd protests

Anne Bailey, Binghamton University Professor of History and Director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity, is available to discuss a variety of issues in relation to the George Floyd protests and race in America.…

We should not be afraid to discuss reparations for slavery

The issue of slavery reparations needs to be addressed in order to heal racial divisions today, according to Anne C. Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York, civil rights scholar and contributor to the prize-winning…

Civil rights scholar: “I fear for my Black son every day”

In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, whose last words were “Momma, I’m through,” civil rights scholar and Binghamton University Professof of History Anne C. Bailey discusses the constant fear that Black mothers hold for their sons.  “As…

Surviving the coronavirus while black: Pandemic’s heavy toll on African American mental health

ANN ARBOR—Black communities in the United States have been disproportionately affected by the number of coronavirus cases and deaths. At the same time, white nationalist activities have increased in the last months.Riana Elyse AndersonRiana Anderson, assistant professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, discusses how these trends are affecting the mental health of African Americans.