Atlantic Health System Physicians Co-Author 5 Studies, Presented at American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting

Atlantic Health System Cancer Care physicians are co-authors of five original studies presented at this year’s AACR Annual Meeting, held virtually April 10-15 and May 17-21. The AACR meeting is one of the world’s premier scientific gatherings of cancer specialists and researchers.

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Weizmann Scientists Find That Bacteria May Aid Anti-Cancer Immune Response

The Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Yardena Samuels, Prof. Eran Segal, and Dr. Ravid Straussman, with partners at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the NCI, and elsewhere, have discovered that the bacteria living inside cancer cells can be harnessed to provoke an immune reaction against the tumor. The work could also help explain findings showing that the microbiome affects the success of immunotherapy.

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Study finds high tumor mutation burden predicts immunotherapy response in some, but not all, cancers

A high rate of genetic mutations within a tumor, known as high tumor mutation burden, was only useful for predicting immunotherapy responses in a subset of cancer types, suggesting that this may not reliably be used as a universal biomarker.

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Moffitt Researchers Show Sequential Treatment with Immunotherapy and Checkpoint Inhibitors Prolongs Anti-Tumor Activity

In a new article published in Cancer Immunology Research, the Moffitt team shows that sequential administration of immunotherapy followed by targeted therapy prolongs anti-tumor responses in preclinical models and may be a potential treatment option for patients with advanced melanoma.

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Yale Researchers Identify Tumor Reactive Immune-Cells to help fight against Advanced Melanoma

According to a new study led by Yale Cancer Center and Department of Neurology researchers, a simple blood draw may be the first step in helping to discover tumor reactive immune or T cells to treat advanced melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. The findings were published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

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NYU Medical Center Board-Certified Dermatologist: How COVID-19 Caused Delays in Skin Cancer Diagnosis

NYU Medical Center Board-Certified Dermatologist: How COVID-19 Caused Delays in Skin Cancer Diagnosis When caught early, skin cancer, including melanoma

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Weizmann Institute of Science and Colleagues Show How Cancer Cells Hurt Themselves to Hurt Immune Cells More

Melanoma is skilled at evading therapies, with its cells going so far as to starve in order to stop the immune cells that would eradicate them. A team from the Weizmann Institute, including Prof. Yardena Samuels; the Netherlands Cancer Institute; and the University of Oslo have revealed one of melanoma’s tricks – never before seen in human cells – and a therapeutic target.

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New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations

UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip. This combination of two small molecules has the potential to treat not only BRAF mutated melanoma but also additional aggressive subtypes of cancers, including melanoma, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers that harbor common mutations in cancer genes called RAS or NF1.

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A Conversation With a Living Legend honoring Admiral William H. McRaven raises $1 million

The North Texas A Conversation With a Living Legend® raised $1 million this week in a virtual version of the signature fundraising event benefiting The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center. The 31st annual event honored Admiral William H. McRaven, U.S. Navy, Retired, in an interview Nov. 16 with CBS News’ Bob Schieffer. Proceeds will benefit MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program®, a collaborative effort to accelerate the development of scientific discoveries into clinical advances that save patients’ lives.

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Mount Sinai Researchers Discover How to Boost Efficacy of Vaccine Designed to Prevent Melanoma Recurrence

A vaccine created to prevent the recurrence of the deadly skin cancer melanoma is about twice as effective when patients also receive two components that boost the number and effectiveness of immune system cells called dendritic cells, according to phase 2 clinical trial results published in Nature Cancer in November.

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MD Anderson researchers present immunotherapy advances at Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual Meeting

Promising clinical results with combination treatments for patients with melanoma and lung cancer highlight immunotherapy advances being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 35th Anniversary Annual Meeting & Pre-Conference Programs (SITC 2020) .

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Plastic Surgeon Matthew S. Coons, M.D., FACS Joins Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Group

Mountainside Medical Group announced today that plastic surgeon Matthew S. Coons, M.D., FACS, has joined the practice.

Dr. Coons is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Plastic Surgery. His interests also include hand surgery and reconstructive surgery with an emphasis on breast reconstruction.

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Scientists kill cancer cells by “shutting the door” to the nucleus

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that blocking the construction of nuclear pores complexes—large channels that control the flow of materials in and out of the cell nucleus—shrank aggressive tumors in mice while leaving healthy cells unharmed. The study, published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, reveals a new Achilles heel for cancer that may lead to better treatments for deadly tumors such as melanoma, leukemia and colorectal cancer.

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Cancer Research Institute Goes Virtual for Its Immunotherapy Patient Summit Series, Connecting Patients and Caregivers with Leading Experts in Cancer Immunotherapy

Free virtual event October 2-3 connecting cancer patients and caregivers with leading immunotherapy experts and patient advocates treated with immunotherapy

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Leading Cancer Treatment Recommendations from NCCN Now Available in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish

NCCN Guidelines, containing expert recommendations for cancer care, are available in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish can all be accessed for free at NCCN.org/global or via the free Virtual Library of NCCN Guidelines® App

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The Secret of Lymph: How Lymph Nodes Help Cancer Cells Spread

August 19, 2020 (DALLAS, TEXAS) – For decades, physicians have known that many kinds of cancer cells often spread first to lymph nodes before traveling to distant organs through the bloodstream. New research from Children’s Medical Center Research Institute at UT Southwestern (CRI) provides insight into why this occurs, opening up new targets for treatments that could inhibit the spread of cancer.

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Researchers Outline Need for Further Evaluation of Gene Expression Profiling in Melanoma Patients

A consensus statement published today in JAMA Dermatology by a group of melanoma researchers evaluates the use of prognostic genetic expression profiling within clinical treatment of patients with melanoma. The group cautioned against routine use of currently-available genetic expression profiling tests for patients with cutaneous melanoma.

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Use of Pembrolizumab Provided Long-Term Benefits in Patients With Metastatic Melanoma, 10-Year Look Shows

A new 10-year analysis led by Igor Puzanov, MD, MSci, FACP, Director of Early Phase Clinical Trials and Chief of Melanoma at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center and published today in the journal JAMA Oncology provides new insights into an important question: whether BRAF V600E/K mutation status or previous BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) therapy with or without a MEK inhibitor (MEKi) affects response to pembrolizumab (brand name Keytruda) in patients with advanced melanoma.

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A helping hand for cancer immunotherapy

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have demonstrated the therapeutic potential of PRMT5 inhibitors to sensitize unresponsive melanoma to immune checkpoint therapy. PRMT5 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials in oncology, and this research provides a strong rationale for evaluating the drugs in tumors that are not responsive to immune checkpoint therapy. The study was published in Science Translational Medicine.

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Expert in Early Phase Therapeutics Joins NYU Langone Health as Associate Director for Clinical Research at Perlmutter Cancer Center

Janice M. Mehnert, MD, a nationally recognized expert in early phase therapeutics and the treatment of skin malignancies, has been appointed associate director for clinical research at NYU Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center. She assumes her post July 1, 2020.

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WHAT TO WEAR TO PROTECT YOUR SKIN FROM THE SUN

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., and nearly 20 Americans die from melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, every day. As more Americans prepare to head outdoors for the 4th of July holiday, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology have an important reminder: dress to protect yourself from the sun. In addition to seeking shade and applying sunscreen, wearing protective clothing goes a long way in protecting you from the sun’s harmful UV rays, which can increase your risk of skin cancer. However, not all clothing is created equal when it comes to sun protection, say dermatologists. Some garments provide better UV protection than others.

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NEW AAD SURVEY: 74% OF PARENTS TODAY SAY THEY WORRY ABOUT SUN PROTECTION MORE WITH THEIR CHILDREN THAN THEIR PARENTS DID WITH THEM

With Father’s Day approaching, dermatologists are giving parents two thumbs up for keeping sun protection top of mind for their families. According to a new survey from the American Academy of Dermatology, 74% of parents today say they worry about sun protection more with their children than their parents did with them, and 90% of parents believe it’s important to teach their children healthy habits now so they will keep them when they are adults.

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Memorial Sloan Kettering Awards & Appointments

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSK) announces its most recent awards and appointments for the institution’s physicians, scientists, nurses, and staff.

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MSK: Cancer Isn’t Sheltering in Place

As the height of the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City and the Tri-State area begins to subside, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center oncologists are urging patients to schedule cancer screenings and treatments now – as the long-term toll of missed diagnoses and delayed treatments could be devastating for patients and their loved ones across the region and the country.

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SURVEY: 60% OF AMERICANS SAY THEY HAVE GOTTEN SUNBURNED SO BADLY THEIR CLOTHES WERE UNCOMFORTABLE

Memorial Day — long considered the unofficial start of summer in the U.S. — is quickly approaching, and dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology are urging Americans to practice safe sun as they head outdoors, especially as shelter-in-place measures related to COVID-19 begin to lift. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the U.S., affecting one in five Americans in their lifetime, yet new data from the AAD shows that many Americans aren’t protecting themselves from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

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NEW AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY SURVEY FINDS MOST AMERICANS KNOW SUN PROTECTION IS IMPORTANT, YET MANY AREN’T PROTECTING THEMSELVES

As more Americans head outdoors for warmer weather and fresh air amid “shelter-in-place” measures, dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology have an important reminder: practice safe sun. Skin cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, but new data from the AAD shows that many Americans aren’t taking the necessary steps to protect themselves.

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Superior Progression-Free Survival Associated with Continuous Targeted Therapy Combination for BRAF-mutated Melanoma

Results from a randomized phase 2 clinical trial examining the targeted therapy drugs dabrafenib and tremetinib in both continuous and intermittent treatment of patients with BRAF-mutated melanoma show continuous dosing yields superior progression free survival. A Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigator shares more on the work presented at the opening plenary session of the virtual AACR Annual Meeting.

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