Johns Hopkins Cancer Researcher Ashani Weeraratna Appointed To National Cancer Advisory Board By President Biden

Johns Hopkins scientist Ashani Weeraratna, PhD, a leading cancer researcher who specializes in melanoma and the effects of aging on cancer, has been appointed by President Joe Biden to serve as a member of the National Cancer Advisory Board.

How a plant virus could protect and save your lungs from metastatic cancer

Using a virus that grows in black-eyed pea plants, researchers developed a new therapy that could keep metastatic cancers from spreading to the lungs, as well as treat established tumors in the lungs.

UCLA researchers awarded $1M from DOD to advance CAR T cell therapy for rare melanomas

Scientists Dr. Cristina Puig-Saus and Dr. Daniel Shin from the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have received a $1 million Translational Research Award from the U.S. Department of Defense Melanoma Research Program to help advance the use of chimeric antigen receptor, or CAR, T cell therapy as a treatment for people with acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas.

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center Researchers Awarded Major Multi-Center Grant to Study Uveal Melanoma

Researchers at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Moffitt Cancer Center and the University of Florida Health Cancer Center received a five-year, $3.95 million NIH grant to study how uveal melanoma spreads to the liver. This work was previously supported by two Florida State Team Science Awards, which provided early-stage funding to help the team progress to the larger NIH grant.

New grant, National Fellowship for UA Little Rock Nanotechnology Researcher

Dr. K. Bao Vang-Dings, a nanotechnology researcher at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, has been named one of nine 2021-22 Public Policy Fellows by the American Association of Immunologists. Additionally, the Arkansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) has awarded her a 2021 Summer Research Grant to support Vang-Dings’ cancer vaccine research.

Astronomy Meets Pathology to Identify Predictive Biomarkers for Cancer Immunotherapy

Pairing sky-mapping algorithms with advanced immunofluorescence imaging of cancer biopsies, researchers at The Mark Foundation Center for Advanced Genomics and Imaging at Johns Hopkins University and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy developed a robust platform to guide immunotherapy by predicting which cancers will respond to specific therapies targeting the immune system.

Dual Immunotherapy Regimen Delays Cancer Progression in Patients with Advanced Melanoma

A treatment regimen for patients with advanced melanoma that combines the immunotherapy agents relatlimab (anti-LAG-3) and nivolumab (anti-PD-1) delayed time to cancer progression significantly more than nivolumab alone, according to results of a study to be presented June 6 at the 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting.

Cleveland Clinic experts available to comment on cancer research presented at ASCO Annual Meeting

Cleveland Clinic cancer researchers are involved with more than 50 studies that’ll be presented at the virtual American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, June 4—8, 2021. Key research from Cleveland Clinic focuses on advancements in the prevention and…

Cancer has ripple effect on distant tissues

A new study with zebrafish shows that a deadly form of skin cancer — melanoma — alters the metabolism of healthy tissues elsewhere in the body. The research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that these other tissues could potentially be targeted to help treat cancer.“Tumors rely on a constant supply of nutrients to grow.

How to Check Your Nails for Melanoma

When checking the body for signs of skin cancer, many people may only think to check their skin. However, board-certified dermatologists from the American Academy of Dermatology say it’s important to check the nails, too. Although rare, skin cancer, including melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — can develop under and around the fingernails and toenails.

The 8th Annual Joseph Calello Melanoma Scholar, Dr. Charles Balch, to Present “The Surgical Management of Melanoma,” a Virtual Lecture, May 6

Atlantic Health System Cancer Care, in partnership with OncLive, invites health care professionals and others interested in the surgical management of melanoma to a virtual lecture by internationally known melanoma expert Charles M. Balch, MD, FACS, FASCO. Dr. Balch is this year’s Joseph Calello Melanoma Scholar. The free lecture and Q & A will be held on May 6, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. ET.

TELL “SKIN CANCER, TAKE A HIKE!™” DURING STEPS CHALLENGE FOR SKIN CANCER AWARNESS MONTH

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States, affecting one in five Americans during their lifetime. To help raise awareness of skin cancer prevention and detection, the American Academy of Dermatology will host Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!™, a month-long steps challenge, beginning Sat., May 1 in recognition of Skin Cancer Awareness Month. The participant-driven fundraising event — part of the AAD’s SPOT Skin Cancer™ campaign to create a world without skin cancer — aims to log 9,500 miles across the country in honor of the approximately 9,500 people who are diagnosed with skin cancer every day.

How the Pandemic Has Exacerbated Rates of Skin Cancer

With summer approaching and more and more people getting vaccinated for COVID-19, many San Diegans eagerly anticipate the season best known for outdoor activities. But with more time in the sun comes the need for sun-safe practices. During the pandemic,…

$10 Million Gift to Open the Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Melanoma and Skin Cancer Center at Mount Sinai

With highly trained specialists skilled in caring for different types of melanoma, patients at the Waldman Melanoma and Skin Center will have access to the newest diagnostics and therapies such as Canfield Vectra180 – a 3D whole body imaging system that captures nearly the entire skin surface in macro quality resolution, and will be able to capture early skin cancer lesions; Nevisense—a safe diagnostic support tool utilizing Electrical Impedence Spectroscopy (EIS) which is applied as a harmless electrical signal to the skin; Vivascope 1500—a non-invasive confocal imaging system which offers a non-invasive way to image the skin to the superficial collagen layers; and innovative technologies which non-invasively collects skin cells through adhesive patches rather than a scalpel to diagnose atypical pigmented lesions (or moles) at high risk for melanoma.

Atlantic Health System Physicians Co-Author 5 Studies, Presented at American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting

Atlantic Health System Cancer Care physicians are co-authors of five original studies presented at this year’s AACR Annual Meeting, held virtually April 10-15 and May 17-21. The AACR meeting is one of the world’s premier scientific gatherings of cancer specialists and researchers.

Weizmann Scientists Find That Bacteria May Aid Anti-Cancer Immune Response

The Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Yardena Samuels, Prof. Eran Segal, and Dr. Ravid Straussman, with partners at MD Anderson Cancer Center, the NCI, and elsewhere, have discovered that the bacteria living inside cancer cells can be harnessed to provoke an immune reaction against the tumor. The work could also help explain findings showing that the microbiome affects the success of immunotherapy.

Study finds high tumor mutation burden predicts immunotherapy response in some, but not all, cancers

A high rate of genetic mutations within a tumor, known as high tumor mutation burden, was only useful for predicting immunotherapy responses in a subset of cancer types, suggesting that this may not reliably be used as a universal biomarker.

Moffitt Researchers Show Sequential Treatment with Immunotherapy and Checkpoint Inhibitors Prolongs Anti-Tumor Activity

In a new article published in Cancer Immunology Research, the Moffitt team shows that sequential administration of immunotherapy followed by targeted therapy prolongs anti-tumor responses in preclinical models and may be a potential treatment option for patients with advanced melanoma.

Yale Researchers Identify Tumor Reactive Immune-Cells to help fight against Advanced Melanoma

According to a new study led by Yale Cancer Center and Department of Neurology researchers, a simple blood draw may be the first step in helping to discover tumor reactive immune or T cells to treat advanced melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer. The findings were published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

NYU Medical Center Board-Certified Dermatologist: How COVID-19 Caused Delays in Skin Cancer Diagnosis

NYU Medical Center Board-Certified Dermatologist: How COVID-19 Caused Delays in Skin Cancer Diagnosis When caught early, skin cancer, including melanoma — the deadliest form of skin cancer — is highly treatable. However, from March to May 2020 during the peak…

Weizmann Institute of Science and Colleagues Show How Cancer Cells Hurt Themselves to Hurt Immune Cells More

Melanoma is skilled at evading therapies, with its cells going so far as to starve in order to stop the immune cells that would eradicate them. A team from the Weizmann Institute, including Prof. Yardena Samuels; the Netherlands Cancer Institute; and the University of Oslo have revealed one of melanoma’s tricks – never before seen in human cells – and a therapeutic target.

New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations

UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip. This combination of two small molecules has the potential to treat not only BRAF mutated melanoma but also additional aggressive subtypes of cancers, including melanoma, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers that harbor common mutations in cancer genes called RAS or NF1.

A Conversation With a Living Legend honoring Admiral William H. McRaven raises $1 million

The North Texas A Conversation With a Living Legend® raised $1 million this week in a virtual version of the signature fundraising event benefiting The University of Texas
MD Anderson Cancer Center. The 31st annual event honored Admiral William H. McRaven, U.S. Navy, Retired, in an interview Nov. 16 with CBS News’ Bob Schieffer. Proceeds will benefit MD Anderson’s Moon Shots Program®, a collaborative effort to accelerate the development of scientific discoveries into clinical advances that save patients’ lives.

Mount Sinai Researchers Discover How to Boost Efficacy of Vaccine Designed to Prevent Melanoma Recurrence

A vaccine created to prevent the recurrence of the deadly skin cancer melanoma is about twice as effective when patients also receive two components that boost the number and effectiveness of immune system cells called dendritic cells, according to phase 2 clinical trial results published in Nature Cancer in November.

MD Anderson researchers present immunotherapy advances at Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer Annual Meeting

Promising clinical results with combination treatments for patients with melanoma and lung cancer highlight immunotherapy advances being presented by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center at The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC) 35th Anniversary Annual Meeting & Pre-Conference Programs (SITC 2020) .

Plastic Surgeon Matthew S. Coons, M.D., FACS Joins Hackensack Meridian Mountainside Medical Group

Mountainside Medical Group announced today that plastic surgeon Matthew S. Coons, M.D., FACS, has joined the practice.

Dr. Coons is board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Plastic Surgery. His interests also include hand surgery and reconstructive surgery with an emphasis on breast reconstruction.