New targeted therapy blocks metabolism in brain cancer cells with genetic vulnerability

Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed a novel targeted therapy, called POMHEX, which blocks critical metabolic pathways in cancer cells with specific genetic defects. Preclinical studies found the small-molecule enolase inhibitor to be effective in killing brain cancer cells that were missing ENO1, one of two genes encoding the enolase enzyme.

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ORNL researcher studies individualized isotopes’ impact by targeting cancer

A radioisotope researcher in the Radioisotope Science and Technology Division at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Davern is focusing on ways to use nanoparticles — particles 100 nanometers or smaller that can have special properties — to contain those radioisotopes and deliver them directly to cancer cells, where they can decay into different isotopes that irradiate those cells.

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KRAS inhibitor sotorasib appears safe, achieves durable clinical benefit in early trial

For patients with advanced solid cancers and KRAS G12C mutations, the targeted therapy sotorasib, a KRAS G12C inhibitor, resulted in manageable toxicities and durable clinical benefits, particularly in lung and colorectal cancer, in Phase I study

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Brain’s Immune Cells Promising Cellular Target for Therapeutics

Inspired by the need for new and better therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, Rutgers University researchers are exploring the link between uncontrolled inflammation within the brain and the brain’s immune cells, known as microglia, which are emerging as a promising cellular target because of the prominent role they play in brain inflammation. In APL Bioengineering, the group highlights the design considerations and benefits of creating therapeutic nanoparticles for carrying pharmacological factors directly to the sites of the microglia.

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Lung cancer trial of RET inhibitor selpercatinib achieves durable responses in majority of patients with RET gene fusions

For patients with non-small cell lung cancers marked by RET gene fusions, the targeted therapy selpercatinib was well tolerated and achieved durable objective responses, or tumor shrinkage, in the majority of patients in a Phase I/II trial.

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Targeted therapy tepotinib for non-small cell lung cancer with MET exon 14 skipping mutation shows durable response

Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the MET exon 14 (METex14) skipping mutation had a 46.5% objective response rate to the targeted therapy drug tepotinib, as shown in a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the 2020 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting (Abstract 9556 – Poster 322) by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

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Study Shows Profound Benefit with Targeted Therapy for Patients with Early Stage NSCLC

According to findings led by researchers at Yale Cancer Center, treatment with the targeted therapy osimertinib following surgery significantly improves disease-free survival (DFS) in patients with early-stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with EGFR gene mutations.

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Superior Progression-Free Survival Associated with Continuous Targeted Therapy Combination for BRAF-mutated Melanoma

Results from a randomized phase 2 clinical trial examining the targeted therapy drugs dabrafenib and tremetinib in both continuous and intermittent treatment of patients with BRAF-mutated melanoma show continuous dosing yields superior progression free survival. A Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey investigator shares more on the work presented at the opening plenary session of the virtual AACR Annual Meeting.

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Drug used for breast, kidney cancers may also extend survival for patients with advanced head and neck cancer

A targeted therapy drug used for breast and kidney cancers may also extend progression-free survival for patients with advanced head and neck cancer who are at high risk for recurrence after standard treatment. Patients enrolled in a randomized phase II trial who received the mTOR inhibitor everolimus were more likely to be cancer-free a year after therapy than those who took a placebo drug, and the benefit persisted for those with mutations in their TP53 gene.

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Science Snapshot From Berkeley Lab – a biocompatible material that turns up the heat on antibacterial-resistant diseases

Scientists at Berkeley Lab’s Molecular Foundry have designed a biocompatible polymer that has the potential to advance photothermal therapy, a technique that deploys near-infrared light to combat antibacterial-resistant infections and cancer.

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