Dr. Anne Rimoin Named to new Gordon–Levin Chair in Infectious Diseases and Public Health at UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

Dr. Anne Rimoin, an internationally recognized expert on emerging infections, global health, infectious disease surveillance systems and vaccinations who has been engaged in pandemic preparedness and response work for more than two decades, has been appointed to the newly established Gordon–Levin Endowed Chair in Infectious Diseases and Public Health at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.

Hand washing and sanitizing not enough: close that toilet lid after flushing!

Leaving toilet lids open after flushing can disperse contaminated droplets beyond a metre and remain in the air for 30 minutes. This is one of the findings revealed in a global review of the risks of bacterial and viral transmission in public bathrooms, undertaken by the ANU and University of South Australia.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Experts Available for Comment Related to 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow on 31 October – 12 November 2021.

The UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has experts available for comment and reaction to the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) in Glasgow on 31 October – 12 November 2021. These include renowned scientists with expertise on…

Countermarketing based on anti-smoking campaigns reduces buying of sugary ‘fruit’ drinks for children

Public health messages such as in the image (associated with this release) — designed to reduce parents’ purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages marketed as fruit drinks for children — convinced a significant percentage of parents to avoid those drinks, according to a study by researchers at the University of Washington and the University of Pennsylvania.

FDA authorization of COVID-19 vaccine for kids 5 to 11: IU experts available to comment

Following a daylong meeting Oct. 26, the FDA authorized Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine for use in children ages 5 to 11. This was the first in a series of meetings to make this vaccine available to younger children. Next, the Advisory…

More than 75% of Texans have COVID-19 antibodies, one of the world’s largest assessments finds

A year after launching one of the world’s largest COVID-19 antibody surveys, Texas CARES, public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth Houston) and the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) are estimating that over 75% of Texans have COVID-19 antibodies.

Modeling Improvements Promise Increased Accuracy for Epidemic Forecasting

Accurate forecasting of epidemic scenarios is critical to implementing effective public health intervention policies. In Chaos, researchers from France and Italy use dynamical stochastic modeling techniques to reveal that infection and recovery rate fluctuations play a critical role in determining peak times for epidemics. Using a susceptible-infected-recovered epidemic model that incorporates daily fluctuations on control parameters, the study applies probability theory calculations to infection counts at the beginning of an epidemic wave and at peak times for populations in Italy.

UCI-led study finds disparities in severe illness and lengthy hospitalizations between undocumented and Medi-Cal patients

Lithium is a common medication prescribed to patients with psychiatric disorders, namely bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. It is used as a mood stabilizer and lessens the intensity of manic episodes, with particular benefit in reducing suicidality. While highly effective, the drug requires routine blood monitoring, which can be uncomfortable, expensive, and inconvenient for patients who must travel to clinical labs for frequent blood testing.

UCI-led study projects health insurance and population growth rates among undocumented Latino immigrants with an eye toward health equity

Lithium is a common medication prescribed to patients with psychiatric disorders, namely bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. It is used as a mood stabilizer and lessens the intensity of manic episodes, with particular benefit in reducing suicidality. While highly effective, the drug requires routine blood monitoring, which can be uncomfortable, expensive, and inconvenient for patients who must travel to clinical labs for frequent blood testing.

UCI-led study investigates saliva testing for medication monitoring among patients with psychiatric disorders

Lithium is a common medication prescribed to patients with psychiatric disorders, namely bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and depression. It is used as a mood stabilizer and lessens the intensity of manic episodes, with particular benefit in reducing suicidality. While highly effective, the drug requires routine blood monitoring, which can be uncomfortable, expensive, and inconvenient for patients who must travel to clinical labs for frequent blood testing.

Virtual Village Treats HIV-associated Loneliness in Novel UC San Diego Health Trial

A new trial by UC San Diego Health infectious disease specialist Maile Young Karris, MD, will use longitudinal questionnaires and qualitative interviews to assess the impact of living in an interconnected virtual village on the loneliness known to afflict older people with HIV.

Hepatitis A Vaccination Required for Herd Immunity in People Experiencing Homelessness or Who Use Drugs

In the U.S., hepatitis A outbreaks are repeatedly affecting people experiencing homelessness or who use drugs. A 2017-19 Kentucky outbreak primarily among these groups resulted in 501 cases, six deaths. Vaccination efforts likely averted 30 hospitalizations and $490K in costs,…

Gun Violence Exposure Associated with Higher Rates of Mental Health-Related ED Visits by Children

Exposure to neighborhood gun violence is associated with increased odds of mental health-related pediatric Emergency Department (ED) visits among children living within four to five blocks of a shooting, according to research by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, published today in JAMA Pediatrics.

UCLA Experts Available for Comment on “A Year of Climate Action” Stemming From the Sixth Assessment Report (AR6) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health Experts, affiliated with FSPH’s UCLA Center for Healthy Climate Solutions, are available for comment on issues raised by the IPCC report: Dr. Jonathan Fielding, UCLA FSPH distinguished professor of health policy and management and…

Study: No Serious COVID-19 Vaccine Side Effects in Breastfeeding Moms, Infants

Researchers found that breastfeeding mothers who received either the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccination reported the same local or systemic symptoms as what has been previously reported in non-breastfeeding women, with no serious side effects in the breastfed infants.

UC San Diego School of Medicine Receives $2.6M for Health Equity Programs

UC San Diego School of Medicine receives $2.6M to fund their PRIME-Health Equity program and launch a new program on Native American health. These medical education programs provide financial support to medical students interested in addressing health disparities and serving local communities.

With Time and Without Masks, COVID-19 Vaccines Wane in Protection

A study measured effectiveness of COVID-19 mRNA vaccines among health workers, most notably during the emergence of delta virus variant and coincident with end of state’s mask mandate, finding protection waned over time, dropping sharply 6-8 months after full vaccination.

2VIDA! Tackles COVID Vaccine Hesitancy and Barriers in Latinx, Black Communities

UC San Diego is collaborating with San Ysidro Health on an NIH-funded outreach program to address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in Latinx and African American communities. The team runs pop-up vaccination sites across San Diego, and goes door-to-door to homes and local businesses to spread awareness.

Early COVID-19 shutdowns helped St. Louis area avoid thousands of deaths

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis estimates the number of deaths that could have occurred had public health orders been delayed for one week, two weeks or four weeks as the pandemic was first taking hold in St. Louis city and St. Louis County. The analysis suggests that, in the first three months of the pandemic, the region avoided thousands of hospitalizations and deaths with early and coordinated public health measures.

Second Breath: Region’s First Double Lung Transplant for COVID-19 Patient

After more than 50 days on advanced life support, a multi-disciplinary team at UC San Diego Health helps a patient who contracted COVID-19 become a candidate for a successful double lung transplant. The transplant surgery was the first in the region performed on a COVID-19 patient.