Physicians urged to consider fungal infections as possible cause for lung inflammation

UC Davis Health infectious diseases expert George Thompson warns of the rising threat and apparent spread of disease-causing fungi outside their traditional hot spots. Fungal lung infections are commonly misdiagnosed, leading to delays in treatment and increase in antimicrobial resistance in the community.

Global health researchers use human movement patterns to determine risk of malaria spreading during certain times of day

In a paper recently published in Malaria Journal, global health researchers, Daniel Parker, PhD, assistant professor, and Guiyun Yan, PhD, professor, both from the UCI Program in Public Health, analyzed the movement ecology of humans in two places of heightened importance for Ethiopia’s malaria control and elimination strategies: Gambella and Benishangul-Gumuz (on the international border with Sudan and South Sudan).

EPA Awards $1 Million to UAlbany Researchers for Community Air Pollution Monitoring Projects

The projects are focused on enhancing air quality monitoring in communities across the U.S. in areas that are underserved, historically marginalized and overburdened by pollution, supporting President Biden’s Justice40 Initiative.

Low-Cost Air Quality Sensors Deliver Insights on Environmental Injustice

Networks of low-cost air quality sensors are able to detect temporary peaks and “hot spots” in air pollution and could be a better tool for tracking short-term changes in air quality in communities than regulatory sensors. Monitoring fine-scale, real-time changes in air pollution could support efforts to protect public health.

Study Finds Persistent Disparities in Access to Prenatal Care Among Pregnant People Based on Citizenship Status and Education Level

Findings suggest exclusions to Medicaid because of immigration status may increase risk for maternal health care disparities in some immigrant populations

UCI study finds 53 percent jump in e-waste greenhouse gas emissions between 2014, 2020

Greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere from electronic devices and their associated electronic waste increased by 53 percent between 2014 and 2020, including 580 metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2020 alone, according to University of California, Irvine researchers.

Surgeons on the Frontline of Gun Violence: Media meet and greet with surgeons who treat firearm violence victims

Surgeons who care for victims of firearm violence every day and are involved in advocacy efforts and research on gun safety and violence prevention will be available to talk with members of the media next week in person at the San Diego Convention Center and virtually through the YouTube Live platform.

Needs and Challenges for COVID-19 Boosters and Other Vaccines in the U.S.

FAU researchers and collaborators provide the most updated guidance to health care providers and urge how widespread vaccination with these boosters can now avoid the specter of future and more lethal variants becoming a reality.

UCLA-led study finds California’s greenhouse gas reductions could be wiped out by 2020 wildfires

A new analysis led by researchers with the University of California has found the 2020 wildfires in the state, the most disastrous wildfire year on record, put twice as much greenhouse gas emissions into the Earth’s atmosphere as the total reduction in such pollutants in California between 2003-2019.

New Algorithm Can Identify Images of Alcohol in Electronic Media; Potential Tool to Limit Online Exposure to Alcohol Marketing

A new algorithm has been found to identify images of alcohol in electronic media with a high degree of accuracy. Possible applications for this algorithm include public health research to quantify exposure to images of alcohol and mobile or web applications to allow individuals to filter unwanted exposure to online alcohol advertising or alcohol-related content. The development and testing of the algorithm are described in a paper published in the October issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research. The algorithm has been made publicly available at no charge.

UCLA Fielding School of Public Health-led research demonstrates the importance of influenza vaccination globally

An international team of researchers has demonstrated that among patients hospitalized for influenza, those who were vaccinated had less severe infections, including reducing the odds for children requiring admittance to an intensive care unit by almost half.

First global survey of mayors shows urgent climate, infrastructure, equity challenges

A new global survey of city leaders underscores pressing challenges facing municipalities, including rising inequality, extreme heat and flood risks exacerbated by climate change, and a need to rebalance transportation systems that overly favor private automobiles.

UTHealth Houston study: Lower cancer screening rates differ by region, tied to social vulnerability

Populations in U.S. counties defined as more vulnerable based on social factors including socioeconomic status and racial/ethnic minority status were significantly less likely to receive timely breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer screenings, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

City-based soda pop taxes don’t effectively reduce sugar consumption

As taxes on sugar-sweetened beverages continue to pop up across the U.S. and abroad, public health experts laud their effect on lowering purchases of the calorie-heavy drinks and encouraging healthier habits. But new research from the University of Georgia suggests many soda taxes might actually not be making much of an impact at all when it comes to improving diets and reducing sugar intake.

UAlbany-led study finds exposure to sun, heat and humidity can exacerbate symptoms of mental disorders

New research links information on New York weather and hospital emergency department visits to assess how summer weather conditions impact people living with mental disorders. Findings can inform strategies to mitigate severe symptoms and improve patient care.

Why has Polio returned to the U.S.? Author of “Constructing the Outbreak: Epidemics in Media and Collective Memory” Katherine Foss explains.

“For too long, we’ve falsely assumed that polio has been eradicated in the U.S.,” says Katherine Foss, a professor and associate director of the School of Journalism & Strategic Media at Middle Tennessee State University. However, no cases doesn’t mean the virus has been eradicated, especially with polio still existing in the world.

New Low-cost Device Rapidly, Accurately Detects Hepatitis C Infection

The entire virus detection process is executed inside a uniquely designed, portable, inexpensive, disposable, and self-driven microfluidic chip. The fully automated sample-in–answer-out molecular diagnostic set-up rapidly detects Hepatitis C virus in about 45 minutes and uses relatively inexpensive and reusable equipment costing about $50 for sample processing and disease detection. The disposable microfluidic chip also offers shorter times for a reliable diagnosis and costs about $2.

Leadership program prepares professionals to respond to public health crises in Puerto Rico

A program called “Advancing Leadership in Times of Crisis” (ALTC) has helped to increase leadership skills and knowledge among public health professionals in Puerto Rico – preparing them to adapt and respond to the challenges posed by a series of public health emergencies, reports a study in a supplement to the September/October issue of the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice (JPHMP). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Exposure to ‘Forever Chemicals’ Costs U.S. Billions in Health Costs

Daily exposure to a class of chemicals used in the production of many household items may lead to cancer, thyroid disease, and childhood obesity, a new study shows. The resulting economic burden is estimated to cost Americans a minimum of $5.5 billion and as much as $63 billion over the lifetime of the current population.