Could Ultra-processed Foods Be the New ‘Silent’ Killer?

Hundreds of novel ingredients never encountered by human physiology are now found in nearly 60 percent of the average adult’s diet and nearly 70 percent of children’s diets in the U.S. An emerging health hazard is the unprecedented consumption of these ultra-processed foods in the standard American diet. This may be the new “silent” killer, as was unrecognized high blood pressure in previous decades.

Pharmacology Expert Comments on RSV Vaccination Errors

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that some pregnant Americans may have been given the wrong RSV vaccine, and some young children received a vaccine approved for use in adults only.  Now, a pharmacology expert at New York Institute…

Prof. Dr. Thanyavee Puthanakit, National Outstanding Researcher in Medical Science, with Clinical Research on the Treatment and Prevention of HIV in Youth

Prof. Dr. Thanyavee expressed her appreciation and honor for receiving the Outstanding Researcher Award.

GW Experts Available: EPA Strengthens Rule on Harmful Soot Pollution

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is strengthening limits on soot, a harmful air pollution in which studies have shown that fine particles kill thousands of Americans every year. According to The Washington Post, the stricter standards could prevent thousands of premature…

Social inequity is linked to lower use of epidural in childbirth

In a study of women in labor in the U. S., social inequity was associated with lower use of neuraxial analgesia — an epidural or spinal pain reliever– among non-Hispanic White women and, to a greater extent, among African American women, according to research at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Columbia Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons (P&S).

Pedestrian injuries from falls versus motor vehicle collisions: are we lacking critical policy and interventions?

Using Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data, researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health compared the national burden of pedestrian injuries from motor vehicles to that of pedestrian falls occurring on streets and sidewalks and found that the probability of a pedestrian suffering a severe injury is higher for motor vehicle collisions as compared to falls.

Psychologist Calls Attention to Social Media as a Public Health Hazard

In New York City Mayor Eric Adams’ State of the City speech, he discussed protecting kids’ mental health in the face of excessive social media usage.  Dr. Anthony Anzalone, a clinical psychologist at Stony Brook Medicine, also agrees that social media…

UC Irvine-led study links long-term air pollution exposure to postpartum depression in SoCal

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 31, 2023 — Long-term maternal exposure to common air pollutants, both before and after childbirth, has been linked to increased risk of postpartum depression for mothers – with symptoms ranging from anxiety and irritability to suicide – and may lead to cognitive, emotional, psychological and behavioral impairments in their infants, according to research led by the University of California, Irvine.

UC Irvine study exposes risks of direct-to-consumer stem cell, exosome COVID-19 therapy ads

Irvine, Calif., Oct. 26, 2023 — A study from the University of California, Irvine has revealed that in 2022, 38 North American businesses used direct-to-consumer advertising to promote unproven stem cell interventions and exosome products as purported treatments and preventatives for COVID-19. Collectively, these organizations operated or facilitated access to 60 clinics – with 24 in the U.

Interprofessional Team from Johns Hopkins Nursing, Public Health, Medicine, and Bayview Receives Top Palliative Care Award from the American Hospital Association

The Palliative Care Program at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, consisting of an interprofessional team of clinicians and researchers from Bayview and Johns Hopkins Schools of Nursing, Public Health, and Medicine, received the 2023 Circle of Life Award from the American Hospital Association.

ACP says ‘Enough is enough,’ vows to continue to fight for lower drug prices for patients

ACP leaders have strong words for pharmaceutical and other health care companies that are challenging the implementation of the Medicare prescription drug price negotiation program. So far, these businesses have spent approximately $400 million challenging the program in U.S. courts. ACP, along with other medical societies, is pushing back.

University Hospitals Invests $531 Million in 2022 Community Benefit to Address Health and Economic Disparities

In its most recent Community Health Investment Report covering 2022, University Hospitals (UH) showcases recent examples of its continued effort to invest in the well-being and health of our community and to address health and economic disparities in Cleveland and Northeast Ohio. Since 2008, UH has invested nearly $5 billion in community benefit, and in 2022 alone, the health system’s community benefit expenditures totaled $531 million.

Researchers find potential way to tweak immune system to help it fight tuberculosis

Tuberculosis is old—ancient even. The infectious bacterial disease that plagued Old Testament Israelites and took down pharaohs was eventually stunted by vaccinations, antibiotics, and public health measures like isolation, but it hasn’t been cured yet. More than a million people around the world still die from TB every year.

Iron supplements provided in prenatal visits improved outcomes

Giving free prenatal iron supplements to medically underserved pregnant patients rather than only recommending them significantly reduced anemia and postpartum blood transfusions, researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and Parkland Health report in a study published in JAMA Network Open.

Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity Announces its 2024 Cohort

The Atlantic Fellows for Health Equity U.S. + Global (AFHE), part of the Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity (Mullan Institute), based at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, is proud to announce its 2024 cohort — 16 emerging leaders from around the globe that are passionate about their common goal to achieve health equity.

Global background rates study analyzes data from 197 million people for assessment of COVID-19 vaccine safety

The US CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) funded Global COVID Vaccine Safety Project has generated background incidence rates on a range of conditions designated as AESI (Adverse Events of Special Interest) for COVID-19 vaccine safety monitoring. Conditions studied included myocarditis, pulmonary embolism, and Guillain-Barré syndrome.

FAU Receives $750,000 Philanthropic Grant for Alzheimer’s Disease

A $750,000 philanthropic grant from the Carl Angus DeSantis Foundation will help FAU develop partnerships and programs that will establish best practice for coordinated care and research for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

Fred Hutch to serve as national coordinating center for new Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander health studies

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center will serve as the national coordinating center for a new epidemiological cohort study among Asian Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (AsA-NHPI). Fred Hutch was awarded a seven-year, $38.7 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to coordinate the effort to gather important health information on these populations, which are underrepresented in biomedical research.

Real-world examples demonstrate how systems science can address health inequities

As researchers increasingly recognize that causes for health issues are structural and interrelated, real-world, innovative case studies demonstrate the value of applying systems science to evaluate health interventions and address health inequities as seen in a special supplement, supported by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, in the October/December issue of Family & Community Health. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

To Cut Global Emissions, Replace Meat and Milk with Plant-Based Alternatives

Replacing 50% of meat and milk products with plant-based alternatives by 2050 can reduce agriculture and land use related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 31% and halt the degradation of forest and natural land, according to new research in Nature Communications journal.

U.S. Drug Overdose Deaths More Than Quadrupled from 1999 to 2020

Regardless of race, age, geography or urbanization, drug overdose deaths in the U.S. more than quadrupled from 1999 to 2020, causing 1,013,852 deaths. The rates increased 4.4 times from 6.9 per 100,000 in 1999 to 30 per 100,000 in 2020.