Mount Sinai’s Yvette Calderon, MD, MS, Elected to National Academy of Medicine for Contributions to Emergency Medicine

Yvette Calderon, MD, MS, Chair of Emergency Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel and Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Election to the NAM is considered one of the highest honors in health and medicine, recognizing individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service. With her election, Mount Sinai has 26 faculty members in the NAM.

American Neurological Association Publishes Research Abstracts for ANA2022, Oct. 22–25 in Chicago

Abstracts of breaking research in neurology and neuroscience, to be presented at the 2022 American Neurological Association Annual Meeting Oct. 22-25, are now available in Annals of Neurology and on the ANA2022 website.

Vertigo: Remote Diagnosis by Experts Using Video-oculography Can Help Rule Out Benign Causes of Dizziness and Vertigo

Vertigo can be due to relatively benign conditions like vestibular neuritis or benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), but it can also be a symptom of dangerous conditions such as stroke. Being able to accurately diagnose the less dangerous causes in…

Current Insurer Calculation of Qualified Payment Amount for Out-of-Network (OON) Care May Violate No Surprises Act

In possible violation of the No Surprises Act, health insurance company calculations of Qualified Payment Amounts (QPA) for anesthesiology, emergency medicine and radiology services (and possibly other specialty services) likely include rates from primary care provider (PCP) contracts. A new study conducted by Avalere Health and commissioned by three national physician organizations examined a subpopulation of PCPs and determined that contracting practices may directly impact the QPA.

Patient deterioration predictor could surpass limits of traditional vital signs, study suggests

A device driven by artificial intelligence that works to predict when a patient will deteriorate could provide a more accurate picture than traditional vital signs, a new study suggests. The technology developed at University of Michigan continuously monitors patients using data from a single electrocardiogram lead, and researchers say it has the potential to save lives anywhere from the hospital to the battlefield.

Child Abuse Evaluations in Emergency Departments Drop During Pandemic, But Reason Unclear

Pediatric Emergency Department (ED) encounters related to physical abuse decreased by 19 percent during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a multicenter study published in the journal Pediatrics. While encounter rates with lower clinical severity dropped during the pandemic, encounter rates with higher clinical severity remained unchanged. This pattern raises concern for unrecognized harm, as opposed to true reductions in child abuse.

Addressing status epilepticus management in low-resource regions: “Where do we fit in?”

Low-resource areas face multiple challenges to diagnosing and treating long-lasting seizures, or status epilepticus. We talked with neurologists in four countries about how status epilepticus is managed in their areas.

Mount Sinai’s Brendan Carr, MD, MS, Receives Prestigious “Chair of the Year Award” from Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association

The Emergency Medicine Residents’ Association (EMRA) of the American College of Emergency Physicians has honored Brendan G. Carr, MD, MS, Chair of Emergency Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine of Mount Sinai and Mount Sinai Health System, with the prestigious “2022 Chair of the Year Award.” He is the only department chair in the country to receive this distinction for 2022, recognizing his exceptional leadership.

EMS Ketamine Use on Agitated Patients on Cocaine Increases Intubation 5.75-fold

Patients with excited delirium often are administered ketamine by EMS before arriving at the hospital. Many of them are intoxicated or are using illicit substances, which may alter the properties of ketamine.

Rutgers Toxicologist Available to Discuss Dangers of Taking Iodine to Treat COVID-19

Professor Lewis Nelson, M.D., is available to discuss the dangers of gargling, snorting, or ingesting Betadine, an iodine-based antiseptic to treat COVID-19. “Although many topical disinfectants such as povidone-iodine, which, is also known as Betadine, generally destroy viruses on direct…

Vicki Noble, MD, appointed Chair of Department of Emergency Medicine at UH Cleveland Medical Center, and Emergency Medicine Physician-in-Chief for system

Vicki Noble, MD, has been named Chair, Department of Emergency Medicine at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, and Emergency Medicine Physician-in-Chief for the UH health system.

Overdose Risk More Than Tripled from 2014-2019 among NJ Medicaid Users

A rise in heroin and fentanyl in New Jersey between 2014-2019 led to the tripling of medically treated opioid overdoses despite the state’s strict limiting of prescription opioids for pain and substantial state initiatives to expand access to treatment for opioid use disorder, according to a Rutgers-led study.

Study finds recent change in EMS transport policy could improve stroke outcomes

A new EMS transport policy implemented in Chicago showed that sending patients suspected of experiencing large vessel occlusion directly to comprehensive stroke centers led to an increase in the use of endovascular therapy, an important treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

Self-inflicted Firearm Injuries Three Times More Common in Rural Youth

A national study published in the Journal of Pediatrics found that Emergency Department (ED) visits by youth for self-harm were nearly 40 percent higher in rural areas compared to urban settings. Strikingly, ED visits by youth for self-inflicted firearm injuries were three times more common in rural areas. Youth from rural areas presenting to the ED for suicidal ideation or self-harm also were more likely to need to be transferred to another hospital for care, which underscores the insufficient mental health resources in rural hospitals.

Mount Sinai’s Simulation Teaching and Research Center Earns Four Accreditations From Society for Simulation in Healthcare

Only center in the world with this combination of distinctions

An Epidemic of Community Violence

Project HEAL (“Help, Empower, and Lead”), a hospital-based violence intervention program working in coordination with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center, opened its doors this month with the mission to address community, domestic, and gang-related violence in Monmouth County.

Visio-Vestibular Examination is a Critical Component of Diagnosing Concussion in Young Athletes, Feasible Across Multiple Care Settings

Early and accurate diagnosis leads to optimal recovery from concussion. Over the past year across a series of studies, the Minds Matter Concussion Program research team at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) has systematically evaluated the use of the visio-vestibular examination (VVE) and its ability to enhance concussion diagnosis and management.

Urgent Care Centers Deter Some Emergency Department Visits, But Costs Remain High

A study published today in Health Affairs documents for the first time that urgent care centers are associated with increased spending for lower-acuity visits across EDs and urgent care centers. Urgent care centers increase the number of people seeking care. For every 37 urgent care visits, one fewer lower acuity ED visit occurs. Urgent care centers increase access, but pose risks for health insurers and patients who must pay these increased costs.

Medication Access for Opioid Use Disorder Lower Among Those Involved with Criminal Justice System

Among people with opioid use disorder (OUD), more than half have reported contact with the criminal justice system. A new study published today in Health Affairs reveals that Medicaid expansion is associated with substantial improvements in access to medications for OUD. However, the study also reveals that individuals referred for treatment by the criminal justice system were substantially less likely to receive medications for OUD as part of the treatment plan.

Black and Latinx Children Less Likely to Get Diagnostic Imaging During Emergency Visits to Children’s Hospitals

The first large study of more than 13 million visits to 44 pediatric Emergency Departments (ED) found that Black and Latinx children were less likely to receive x-rays, CT, ultrasound, and MRI compared with white children. These findings, published in JAMA Network Open, were consistent across most diagnostic groups and persisted when stratified by public or private insurance type.

Aspirin Use May Decrease Ventilation, ICU admission and Death in COVID-19 Patients

George Washington University researchers found low dose aspirin may reduce the need for mechanical ventilation, ICU admission and in-hospital mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. Final results indicating the lung protective effects of aspirin were published today in Anesthesia & Analgesia.

Geriatric Emergency Departments Associated with Lower Medicare Expenditures

As the U.S. population ages, more hospitals are implementing geriatric emergency department (GED) programs with specialized staff focused on transitional care for older adults. A new study finds that providing specialized geriatric emergency care results in lower Medicare expenditures up to $3,200 per beneficiary.

Eight ways Argonne advanced science in 2020

Throughout 2020, Argonne answered fundamental science questions and provided solutions for the world.

American College of Academic Addiction Medicine Announces Bruce Hammond, Jr., as Executive Director

The American College of Academic Addiction Medicine (ACAAM) today announced the appointment of Bruce E. Hammond, Jr., CAE, as Executive Director, effective January 1, 2021. Mr. Hammond will step into the new position following the long-planned end-of-year retirement of Kevin Kunz, M.D., M.P.H., DFSAM, founding ACAAM President (2008) and Executive Vice President since 2013. ACAAM was formerly known as The ABAM Foundation and The Addiction Medicine Foundation.

From the heart: Study shows impact of social media appeals from COVID-19 frontliners

Anyone who’s on social media right now has probably seen them: Passionate pleas from health care workers, asking for the public to realize how bad the COVID-19 pandemic has gotten, and urging them to take steps to slow the spread of coronavirus.

But do these first-person posts from the heart actually have any effect? A new study suggests so.