Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

Vaccines take time to work. After getting a COVID-19 vaccine, it takes a while for the immune system to fully respond and provide protection from the virus. For the Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines, it takes up to two weeks after the second shot to become appropriately protected.

Closing the Racial Disparity Gap in Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

In-hospital cardiac arrests (IHCA) represent catastrophic and often terminal events. Despite investments to improve the quality of resuscitation efforts, fewer than 25% of all patients that experience cardiac arrests in hospitals survive to discharge, and survival varies significantly across hospitals and by race. Until now, few have been able to specify reasons for the between-hospital differences.

How Do Outcomes for In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest Differ in Patients Treated with Long-Term Dialysis?

• Among patients who experience cardiac arrest while in the hospital, those on dialysis were less likely to have a shockable rhythm and more likely to be outside of the intensive care unit at the time of arrest compared with patients not on dialysis.
• Patients on dialysis had lower scores for resuscitation quality, and they were less likely to have defibrillation within 2 minutes.
• Patients on dialysis had a similar likelihood of surviving to hospital discharge, and they had better neurological function at the time of discharge.

Bystander CPR Less Likely for People Living in Hispanic Neighborhoods Compared to Non-Hispanic Neighborhoods

People living in predominately Hispanic neighborhoods are less likely to receive CPR from a bystander following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to people living in non-Hispanic neighborhoods, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Duke University of School of Medicine reported in the journal Circulation. This same group also had a lower likelihood of survival.

‘M-RISE’ Research Program Aims to Prevent Brain Damage Caused by Cardiac Arrest

ANN ARBOR, Mich. – For the more than 350,000 Americans that experience an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest each year, less than 1 in 10 of those treated will survive with good neurologic function. “Survival for these patients decreases with every minute there is a delay…