Membrane Technology: Looking Deep into Smallest Pores

Membranes of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VaCNT) can be used to clean or desalinate water at high flow rate and low pressure. Recently, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and partners carried out steroid hormone adsorption experiments to study the interplay of forces in the small pores. They found that VaCNT of specific pore geometry and pore surface structure are suited for use as highly selective membranes. The researchers report in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-024-44883-2)

Rakuten Medical Presents AI-based Study in Two Posters on Immune Characteristics in Responders and Cellular Level Drug Quantification of Alluminox Treatment (Photoimmunotherapy) at SITC 2023

Rakuten Medical, Inc., a global biotechnology company developing and commercializing precision, cell-targeted therapies based on its proprietary Alluminox™ platform today announced the presentation of two posters of AI-based analyses at the 38th Annual Meeting of the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer (SITC), held November 3-5, 2023, in San Diego, CA (SITC 2023).

Green Genetic Engineering: Making Mendel’s Dream Come True with Molecular Scissors

Molecular biologist Professor Holger Puchta from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) is granted funding within a Reinhart Koselleck Project by the German Research Foundation (DFG) for work on specific restructuring of plant genomes. Puchta, a pioneer of green genetic engineering,…

Department of Energy Announces $80 Million for Research to Accelerate Innovations in Emerging Technologies

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $80 million, provided by the Office of Science, to support fundamental research to drive the innovation cycle in support of the Accelerate Innovations in Emerging Technologies (Accelerate) initiative.

UC San Diego Awarded $8M to Expand Stem Cell Therapy Clinical Trials

UC San Diego Alpha Stem Cell Clinic awarded $8M to expand clinical trials of novel stem cell therapies. The CIRM award will advance partnerships between academic and industry experts in San Diego to expedite clinical trials for patients with difficult-to-treat diseases.

New technique makes gene editing at scale possible in animals, turning years of work into days and making new kinds of genetic experiments possible

A new gene editing technique developed by University of Oregon researchers compresses what previously would have been years of work into just a few days, making new kinds of research possible in animal models.

DOE Announces $178 Million to Advance Bioenergy Technology

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $178 million for bioenergy research to advance sustainable technology breakthroughs that can improve public, health, help address climate change, improve food and agricultural production, and create more resilient supply chains. This funding will support cutting-edge biotechnology R&D of bioenergy crops, industrial microorganisms, and microbiomes. Alternative clean energy sources like bioenergy are playing a key role in reaching President Biden’s goal of a net-zero carbon economy by 2050.

Call for Papers – The International Halal Science and Technology Conference 2022 (IHSATEC): 15th Halal Science Industry and Business (HAISB)

The Halal Science Center, Chulalongkorn University, and Research Synergy Foundation, invites all to attend “The International Halal Science and Technology Conference 2022 (IHSATEC): 15th Halal Science Industry and Business (HAISB)” and has opened up a call for papers. The conference sessions will be on December 15-16, 2022 at Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Eliksa Therapeutics launched with University of Utah’s commercial and clinical-stage regenerative medicine technology

Eliksa Therapeutics, a regenerative medicine company developing novel therapeutics for a range of debilitating diseases, announced today it has launched with investments from the University of Utah (U) and Militia Hill Ventures (MHV) to develop and commercialize multiple clinical programs using the regenerative medicine technology developed at the U.

Turning white blood cells into medicinal microrobots with light

Researchers reporting in ACS Central Science have used lasers to precisely control neutrophils — a type of white blood cell — as a natural, biocompatible microrobot in living fish. The “neutrobots” performed multiple tasks, showing they could someday deliver drugs to precise locations in the body.

FAU Marine Science Trailblazer Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Shirley Pomponi, Ph.D., an ocean explorer, aquanaut and marine biotechnologist, will receive the Society for In Vitro Biology’s (SIVB) highest award – the 2022 “Lifetime Achievement Award.” She has made pioneering, scientific advances and contributions to marine invertebrate biotechnology, biological oceanography and national marine policy.

RegeneratOR Workforce Development Receives NSF Award

With the recent announcement of the RegeneratOR Test Bed to support regenerative medicine start up companies, the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) and the RegenMed Development Organization (RemDO) are embarking on the next step – to help create the future workforce.

New US and German collaboration aims to produce green hydrogen more efficiently

Through a new award program, the U.S. National Science Foundation and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation, DFG) have joined forces to award the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and Technical University of Darmstadt a three-year $720,000 research grant ($500,000 from…

DeepMind and EMBL release the most complete database of predicted 3D structures of human proteins

Partners use AlphaFold, the AI system recognised last year as a solution to the protein structure prediction problem, to release more than 350,000 protein structure predictions including the entire human proteome to the scientific community

Smartphone screens effective sensors for soil or water contamination

The touchscreen technology used in billions of smartphones and tablets could also be used as a powerful sensor, without the need for any modifications. Researchers from the University of Cambridge have demonstrated how a typical touchscreen could be used to…