New gene signature could transform immunotherapy for gastrointestinal cancers

A recent study in gastrointestinal (GI) cancer research reveals a promising advancement in predicting patient responses to immune checkpoint inhibitor (ICI) therapy. The newly developed DNA damage response-related immune activation (DRIA) signature could serve as a groundbreaking biomarker, providing valuable guidance for ICI therapy decisions.

Timing of Both Fasting and Meals Affects Degree of DNA Damage to Small Intestine Caused by Chemotherapy

Article title: Mechanisms driving fasting-induced protection from genotoxic injury in the small intestine Authors: Kali Deans-Fielder, Timothy Wu, Thanh Nguyen, Sarah To, Yang-Zhe Huang, Steven J. Bark, Jason C. Mills, Noah F. Shroyer From the authors: “Our results also showed…

MD Anderson Research Highlights for April 12, 2024

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

New treatment for a rare and aggressive cancer improves survival rates in breakthrough clinical trial

An innovative treatment significantly increases the survival of people with malignant mesothelioma, a rare but rapidly fatal type of cancer with few effective treatment options, according to results from a clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London.

Researchers Discover Why One Type of Chemotherapy Works Best in Bladder Cancer

Tisch Cancer Institute researchers discovered that a certain type of chemotherapy improves the immune system’s ability to fight off bladder cancer, particularly when combined with immunotherapy, according to a study published in Cell Reports Medicine in January.

Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Create Machine Learning Model To Calculate Chemotherapy Success In Patients With Osteosarcoma

A research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine has created and trained a machine learning model to calculate percent necrosis (PN) — or, what percentage of a tumor is “dead” and no longer active — in patients with osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer. The model’s calculation was 85% correct when compared to the results of a musculoskeletal pathologist.

MD Anderson Research Highlights: ESMO 2023 Special Edition

This special edition features upcoming oral presentations by MD Anderson researchers at the 2023 European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress focused on clinical advances across a variety of cancer types.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for October 4, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back. Recent developments at MD Anderson include a computer game that helps breast cancer survivors improve symptoms of peripheral neuropathy, a publicly available single-cell atlas of CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells, new targets for TP53-mutant acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a preclinical target for preventing chemobrain, a blood test to help identify patients at higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and genomic insights to predict the risk of outcomes in patients with bone cancer.

Advanced Bladder Cancer Patients Could Keep Their Bladder Under New Treatment Regime, Clinical Trial Shows

Mount Sinai investigators have developed a new approach for treating invasive bladder cancer without the need for surgical removal of the bladder, according to a study published in Nature Medicine in September.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for June 7, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention.

Chemotherapy Drug Increases Kidney Injury in Mouse Model of Lung Cancer

Article title: Lung cancer-kidney cross talk induces kidney injury, interstitial fibrosis, and enhances cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity Authors: Andrew Orwick, Sophia M. Sears, Cierra N. Sharp, Mark A. Doll, Parag P. Shah, Levi J. Beverly, Leah J. Siskind From the authors: “This…

MD Anderson Research Highlights for March 29, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention.

Dual immunotherapy plus chemotherapy before surgery improves patient outcomes in operable lung cancer

In a Phase II trial led by researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, adding ipilimumab to a neoadjuvant, or pre-surgical, combination of nivolumab plus platinum-based chemotherapy, resulted in a major pathologic response (MPR) in half of all treated patients with early-stage, resectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

Ochsner Health Advances Precision Medicine, Becomes National Leader in Universal Genomic Testing for Chemotherapy

Ochsner Health is leading the way for precision medicine nationwide by becoming one of the first hospital systems to standardize genomic testing, significantly advancing ways in which care teams can treat cancer patients. This change helps providers determine individualized treatment by understanding how patients will react to certain drugs, thereby lowering risk of adverse side effects, improving patient experience, and bettering patient outcomes.

MD Anderson Research Highlights for March 8, 2023

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

Mouse study suggests new therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease in cancer survivors

Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York have discovered that common cancer treatments, such as radiotherapy or anthracycline drugs, cause long-term damage to heart tissue by activating a key inflammatory signaling pathway. The study, published December 19 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that inhibiting this pathway could reduce the chances of cancer survivors suffering heart disease later in life.

Anti-sedative could alleviate cancer therapy side effects, study suggests

Researchers in China have discovered that inhibiting a protein called the GABAA receptor can protect intestinal stem cells from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The study, published September 20 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that the FDA-approved anti-sedative flumazenil, which targets GABAA receptors, could alleviate some of the common gastrointestinal side effects, such as diarrhea and vomiting, induced by many cancer treatments.

NUS AI platform enables doctors to optimise personalised chemotherapy dose

A team of researchers from National University of Singapore, in collaboration with clinicians from the National University Cancer Institute, Singapore which is part of the National University Health System, has reported promising results in using CURATE.AI, an artificial intelligence tool that identifies and better allows clinicians to make optimal and personalised doses of chemotherapy for patients.

Chula Excellence Cancer Center collabs with medical specialists from various fields to enhance treatment capabilities.

Chula now has an Excellence Chulalongkorn Comprehensive Cancer Center bringing together medical specialists from various areas of expertise to attend to cancer patients using the latest academic and technological know-how to enhance the quality of life and the possibilities of being cured for patients of all types of cancer.

Stress-relief Music Therapy Can Also Effectively Relieve Pain

Medical results show that music therapy can lower blood pressure, relieve pain during chemotherapy and dialysis, as well as stimulate the elderly brain. The Faculty of Fine and Applied Arts, Chulalongkorn University is offering a Music Therapy Program aiming to heal the ever-increasing patients with various chronic diseases in society.

Study Shows Immunotherapy Drug Combination Improves Response in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Including a Subset of Estrogen Receptor Positive Cancers

In a new study by researchers at Yale Cancer Center, combining the immunotherapy drug durvalumab and PARP-inhibitor olaparib with chemotherapy improved response to treatment for women with high-risk, HER2-negative breast cancer, including a subset of estrogen receptor positive cancers.