Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s again named top pediatric cancer program

U.S. News &World Report has named Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center #1 in the nation in its 2022-23 Best Children’s Hospitals report. Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s has been recognized as one of the top three pediatric cancer centers in the country each year since the ranking’s inception, earning more #1 rankings than any other program.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles: 美国加州和太平洋地区最好的儿童护理机构

《美国新闻与世界报道》再次将 CHLA 评为其本州加利福尼亚州和美国太平洋地区(包括阿拉斯加州、加利福尼亚州、夏威夷州、俄勒冈州和华盛顿州)的最佳儿童医院。CHLA 还连续 14 年(自该排名诞生以来从未缺席)入选该刊年度“最佳儿童医院榜”——美国领先儿科机构权威榜单——最终名列第 8 位。

Emily Whitehead, First Pediatric Patient to Receive CAR T-Cell Therapy, Celebrates Cure 10 Years Later

Ten years ago, Tom and Kari Whitehead came to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) looking for a miracle. Their 6-year-old daughter, Emily, had relapsed in her battle with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), after many months of unsuccessful chemotherapy and a disease that had progressed so rapidly that she was ineligible for a bone marrow transplant to treat it. Her family came to CHOP in the hopes that Dr. Stephan Grupp, a pioneer in the field of cellular immunotherapy, could provide the miracle they were looking for.

Combining Two ‘Old Therapies’ Packs a Powerful Punch Against Pediatric Brain Tumors

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and Italy’s Catholic University of the Sacred Heart medical school have provided solid evidence that copper, the first metal used medicinally, may now have a new role — helping save children from a devastating central nervous system cancer known as medulloblastoma.

CHOP Researchers Develop a New Class of CAR-T Cells that Target Previously Untargetable Cancer Drivers

In a breakthrough for the treatment of aggressive solid cancers, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a novel cancer therapy that targets proteins inside cancer cells that are essential for tumor growth and survival but have been historically impossible to reach. Using the power of large data sets and advanced computational approaches, the researchers were able to identify peptides that are presented on the surface of tumor cells and can be targeted with “peptide-centric” chimeric antigen receptors (PC-CARs), a new class of engineered T cells, stimulating an immune response that eradicates tumors.

New NCCN Guidelines Analyze Evidence for Cancer Type Found Almost Exclusively in Children

National Comprehensive Cancer Network publishes first-ever complete medical guidelines for a pediatric solid tumor, so children everywhere receive the best care based on the latest research. NCCN Guidelines for Wilms Tumor shares information for earlier, safer diagnosis and treatment in effort to reduce disparities; doctors warn of late diagnosis as a possible impact from the COVID-19 pandemic.

CHOP Researchers Find NTRK Fusions More Common than Expected in Pediatric Tumors

In a large study of pediatric cancer patients, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have analyzed the frequency, fusion partners, and clinical outcome of neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK) fusions, which are clinical biomarkers that identify patients suitable for treatment with FDA-approved TRK inhibitors. The researchers found that NTRK fusions are more common in pediatric tumors and also involve a wider range of tumors than adult cancers, information that could help prioritize screening for NTRK fusions in pediatric cancer patients who might benefit from treatment with TRK inhibitors.

Studying Patterns of Relapse in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma using a Response-Based Therapy Approach

Recent research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey expert as part of a phase 3 study from the Children’s Oncology Group explores response-based consolidation with modern radiation therapy as safe and effective standard of care for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma patients. This work is being presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) this week.

New Guidelines for Maximizing Cures and Minimizing Side Effects in Children with Hodgkin Lymphoma

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network announces publication of new NCCN Guidelines for Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma, one of the most curable forms of pediatric cancer. They synthesize the latest evidence and expert-consensus to make sure every child receives appropriate, but not excessive, treatment.

UChicago bioinformatics team to create data infrastructure for global pediatric cancer initiative

The University of Chicago Pediatric Cancer Data Commons and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society are working together to bring precision medicine to children and young adults with acute leukemia.

$500,000 gift supports worldwide effort to harness pediatric cancer data to advance treatment for children

Family looks to the ‘bright side’ by creating a charity to support pediatric cancer research and providing UChicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital with $500,000 gift.

New Treatment Developed by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Shows Success in High-Risk Solid Tumors

In a breakthrough study, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have shown that an enhanced treatment developed in their lab leads to long-term remissions in 80% to 100% of mice with drug-resistant or high-risk solid tumors. The research, which could soon lead to clinical trials, is described in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Brain Cancer: UVA IDs Gene Responsible for Deadly Glioblastoma

The discovery of the oncogene responsible for glioblastoma could be the brain tumor’s Achilles’ heel, one researcher says.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Ranked No. 1 Children’s Hospital in the Western U.S., No. 5 Nationally for Second Straight Year

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) ranks again among the nation’s premier destinations for pediatric care, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Children’s Hospitals annual list released today. Hospital retains national No. 5 ranking and is highest scoring children’s hospital in Western United States.

Angiotensin Hormone’s Protective Effects Could Improve Cancer Treatment

Article title: Angiotensin-(1–7) reduces doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats through antioxidant mechanisms Authors: Omeed Rahimi, Jay Kirby, Jasmina Varagic, Brian Westwood, E. Ann Tallant, Patricia E. Gallagher From the authors: “[Angiotensin]-(1–7) is a clinically safe peptide hormone with cardioprotective…

Post-diagnosis disparities drive poorer outcomes for pediatric Black and Hispanic brain cancer patients

Of 1,881 patients under age 19 diagnosed with cancers of the brain and central nervous system between 2000 and 2015, 52 percent of White patients lived five years from diagnosis, whereas only 44 percent of African American patients and 45 percent of Hispanic patients reached a similar milestone.

Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models

In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. These cancers are the most common childhood brain cancer, accounting for up to one-third of all cases. Low grade pediatric gliomas arise in brain cells (glia) that support and nourish neurons, and current standard chemotherapies with decades-old drugs, while generally effective in lengthening life, often carry side effects or are not tolerated. Approximately 50% of children treated with traditional therapy have their tumors regrow, underscoring the need for better, targeted treatments.

The Pediatric Cancer Genome Project at 10: The impact lives on

Ten years ago this week St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine unveiled an ambitious collaboration to identify the genetic changes that lead to some of the world’s deadliest childhood cancers. The researchers proposed a three-year, $65 million project to sequence the complete normal and cancer genomes of more than 600 childhood cancer patients.

Partnership with China prompts change in care for high-risk type of leukemia

Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Chinese Children’s Cancer Group led the first randomized, Phase III clinical trial comparing targeted therapies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) driven by the Philadelphia chromosome. Results showed that the drug dasatinib provides more benefit than the standard of care, which led to changes in the way this leukemia is treated. The findings were reported today in JAMA Oncology.

$150K Pledge from Om Foundation to Support Pediatric Cancer Research at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

A $150,000 pledge from the Om Foundation will aid investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in examining a certain type of medication that impacts gene activity in the treatment of a form of pediatric brain cancer.