New NCCN Guidelines Analyze Evidence for Cancer Type Found Almost Exclusively in Children

National Comprehensive Cancer Network publishes first-ever complete medical guidelines for a pediatric solid tumor, so children everywhere receive the best care based on the latest research. NCCN Guidelines for Wilms Tumor shares information for earlier, safer diagnosis and treatment in effort to reduce disparities; doctors warn of late diagnosis as a possible impact from the COVID-19 pandemic.

CHOP Researchers Find NTRK Fusions More Common than Expected in Pediatric Tumors

In a large study of pediatric cancer patients, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have analyzed the frequency, fusion partners, and clinical outcome of neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK) fusions, which are clinical biomarkers that identify patients suitable for treatment with FDA-approved TRK inhibitors. The researchers found that NTRK fusions are more common in pediatric tumors and also involve a wider range of tumors than adult cancers, information that could help prioritize screening for NTRK fusions in pediatric cancer patients who might benefit from treatment with TRK inhibitors.

Studying Patterns of Relapse in Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma using a Response-Based Therapy Approach

Recent research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey expert as part of a phase 3 study from the Children’s Oncology Group explores response-based consolidation with modern radiation therapy as safe and effective standard of care for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma patients. This work is being presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) this week.

New Guidelines for Maximizing Cures and Minimizing Side Effects in Children with Hodgkin Lymphoma

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network announces publication of new NCCN Guidelines for Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma, one of the most curable forms of pediatric cancer. They synthesize the latest evidence and expert-consensus to make sure every child receives appropriate, but not excessive, treatment.

UChicago bioinformatics team to create data infrastructure for global pediatric cancer initiative

The University of Chicago Pediatric Cancer Data Commons and The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society are working together to bring precision medicine to children and young adults with acute leukemia.

$500,000 gift supports worldwide effort to harness pediatric cancer data to advance treatment for children

Family looks to the ‘bright side’ by creating a charity to support pediatric cancer research and providing UChicago Medicine Comer Children’s Hospital with $500,000 gift.

New Treatment Developed by Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Shows Success in High-Risk Solid Tumors

In a breakthrough study, researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have shown that an enhanced treatment developed in their lab leads to long-term remissions in 80% to 100% of mice with drug-resistant or high-risk solid tumors. The research, which could soon lead to clinical trials, is described in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

Brain Cancer: UVA IDs Gene Responsible for Deadly Glioblastoma

The discovery of the oncogene responsible for glioblastoma could be the brain tumor’s Achilles’ heel, one researcher says.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Ranked No. 1 Children’s Hospital in the Western U.S., No. 5 Nationally for Second Straight Year

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) ranks again among the nation’s premier destinations for pediatric care, according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Children’s Hospitals annual list released today. Hospital retains national No. 5 ranking and is highest scoring children’s hospital in Western United States.

Angiotensin Hormone’s Protective Effects Could Improve Cancer Treatment

Article title: Angiotensin-(1–7) reduces doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats through antioxidant mechanisms Authors: Omeed Rahimi, Jay Kirby, Jasmina Varagic, Brian Westwood, E. Ann Tallant, Patricia E. Gallagher From the authors: “[Angiotensin]-(1–7) is a clinically safe peptide hormone with cardioprotective…

Post-diagnosis disparities drive poorer outcomes for pediatric Black and Hispanic brain cancer patients

Of 1,881 patients under age 19 diagnosed with cancers of the brain and central nervous system between 2000 and 2015, 52 percent of White patients lived five years from diagnosis, whereas only 44 percent of African American patients and 45 percent of Hispanic patients reached a similar milestone.

Combination Drug Therapy For Childhood Brain Tumors Shows Promise In Laboratory Models

In experiments with human cells and mice, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center report evidence that combining the experimental cancer medication TAK228 (also called sapanisertib) with an existing anti-cancer drug called trametinib may be more effective than either drug alone in decreasing the growth of pediatric low-grade gliomas. These cancers are the most common childhood brain cancer, accounting for up to one-third of all cases. Low grade pediatric gliomas arise in brain cells (glia) that support and nourish neurons, and current standard chemotherapies with decades-old drugs, while generally effective in lengthening life, often carry side effects or are not tolerated. Approximately 50% of children treated with traditional therapy have their tumors regrow, underscoring the need for better, targeted treatments.

The Pediatric Cancer Genome Project at 10: The impact lives on

Ten years ago this week St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine unveiled an ambitious collaboration to identify the genetic changes that lead to some of the world’s deadliest childhood cancers. The researchers proposed a three-year, $65 million project to sequence the complete normal and cancer genomes of more than 600 childhood cancer patients.

Partnership with China prompts change in care for high-risk type of leukemia

Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and the Chinese Children’s Cancer Group led the first randomized, Phase III clinical trial comparing targeted therapies for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) driven by the Philadelphia chromosome. Results showed that the drug dasatinib provides more benefit than the standard of care, which led to changes in the way this leukemia is treated. The findings were reported today in JAMA Oncology.

$150K Pledge from Om Foundation to Support Pediatric Cancer Research at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

A $150,000 pledge from the Om Foundation will aid investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey in examining a certain type of medication that impacts gene activity in the treatment of a form of pediatric brain cancer.

Research on firearm injuries to U.S. children gets 30 times less funding per death than other causes

Firearm injuries kill 2,500 American children each year. But the nation spends far less on studying what led to these injuries, and what might prevent and treat them, than it spends on other causes of death in children. In fact, on a per-death basis, funding for pediatric firearm research is 30 times lower than it would have to be to keep pace with research on other child health threats.

Algorithm Reduces Need for Therapy in Children With Intermediate-Risk Neuroblastoma

Roswell Park’s Dr. Clare Twist led an effort to develop and validate a new treatment algorithm for infants and children with neuroblastoma. In a new study in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, the team reports that many patients can safely receive less extensive therapy.