MD Anderson Research Highlights for September 28, 2022

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include an investigation into the efficacy of dexamethasone for dyspnea relief, a combination therapy for hairy cell leukemia, an analysis of RAS mutations and their prognostic value in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a possible new combination therapy for basal-like breast cancer, and swallowing exercises to improve the quality of life for patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiotherapy.

MD Anderson celebrates World Cancer Research Day

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center again supports World Cancer Research Day, Sept. 24, and its goals to highlight the importance of cancer research, to promote scientific collaboration and to reduce the global burden of cancer through improved prevention, early detection, treatment and survivorship strategies.

My Wellness Check Goes Live for All Sylvester Cancer Patients, Providers

My Wellness Check, an electronic health record integrated symptom and practical-needs screening and referral system developed at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, part of UHealth – University of Miami Health System, went live for all Sylvester outpatients and providers on June 1.

New Resource for Survivors from NCCN Helps Guide Life After Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment

NCCN announces the publication of new, free informational resources on health and wellness for cancer survivors. Two new NCCN Guidelines for Patients® focus on healthy living and managing late and long-term side effects, and include appropriate ongoing screening for recurrence.

Mindfulness meditation, survivorship classes reduce symptoms of depression in younger breast cancer survivors

New UCLA-led research shows that behavioral interventions — mindfulness meditation and survivorship education classes — are effective in reducing depressive symptoms in younger breast cancer survivors, who often experience the highest levels of depression, stress and fatigue that can persist for as long as a decade after their diagnosis.

Younger Cancer Survivors Far More Likely to Experience Food and Financial Insecurity than their Cancer-Free Peers, According to Researchers from American Cancer Society

New research from the American Cancer Society in the March 2020 issue of JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds that younger cancer survivors are more likely to experience significant financial strain for food, housing, and monthly bills after diagnosis.

Most Rehabilitating Sea Turtles with Infectious Tumors Don’t Survive

Fibropapillomatosis (FP) is the most significant infectious disease affecting sea turtle populations worldwide. FB leads to tumors on the turtles’ eyes, flippers and internal organs and is widespread in warmer climates like Florida. A large-scale study evaluated tumor score, removal and regrowth in rehabilitating green sea turtles with FP in the southeastern U.S. from 2009 to 2017, and found that 75 percent did not survive following admission into a rehabilitation facility, irrespective of whether or not tumor regrowth occurred after surgery.

Researchers Surprised by High Levels of Alcohol Consumption among Cancer Survivors

New research JNCCN—Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, using data from NHIS to examine self-reported drinking habits among people reporting a cancer diagnosis, finds 56.5% were current drinkers, 34.9% exceeded moderate drinking levels, and 21% engaged in binge drinking.