New study finds persistent viral shedding of COVID-19 is associated with delirium and six-month mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients

The Northwestern Medicine Neuro COVID-19 research team discovered patients who continued to test positive more than 14 days after their initial positive test were more likely to experience delirium, longer hospital stays, were less likely to be discharged home, and had a greater six-month mortality than those without persistent viral shedding of COVID-19.

Henry Ford Stroke Centers Earn Advanced Stroke Certifications from The Joint Commission

Henry Ford Medical Center – Brownstown has earned an Acute Stroke Ready Hospital advanced stroke certification from The Joint Commission, making it the first freestanding Emergency Room in the State of Michigan to do so, and Henry Ford Macomb Hospital has earned recertification as a Primary Stroke Center.

Supportive Care for Neurology Patients

In June of 2021, retired nurse Linda Leaming, 70, of LaVerne, was admitted to Cedars-Sinai after suffering a stroke. She was delirious and refusing to eat and drink, and her husband, Rich Leaming, struggled with decisions about her care. Neuropalliative specialist Jessica Besbris, MD, director of Neuropalliative Care and the Neurology Supportive Care Medicine Program at Cedars-Sinai, came to his aid.

UTHealth Houston’s UTMOVE program receives distinguished Edmond J. Safra Fellowship in Movement Disorders

UTHealth Houston’s Movement Disorders and Neurodegenerative Diseases Fellowship Training Program (UTMOVE fellowship program) has been chosen by The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF) as one of eight international academic centers to train a new movement disorder clinician-researcher — a neurologist with additional training and expertise in diagnosing and treating Parkinson’s and related diseases — as part of the Edmond J. Safra Fellowship in Movement Disorders Class of 2025.

AI Could Predict Ideal Chronic Pain Patients for Spinal Cord Stimulation

Spinal cord stimulation is a minimally invasive FDA-approved treatment to manage chronic pain such as back and neck pain. The ability to accurately predict which patients will benefit from this treatment in the long term is unclear and currently relies on the subjective experience of the implanting physician. A study is the first to use machine-learning algorithms in the neuromodulation field to predict long-term patient response to spinal cord stimulation.

Does Multiple Sclerosis Play a Role in Cancer Screening and Diagnosis?

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) are less likely to have breast cancers detected through cancer screenings than women without MS, according to new research published in the April 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Conversely, researchers also found that people with MS are more likely to have colorectal cancers detected at an early stage than those without MS.

Study Finds Rate of Multiple Sclerosis Similarly High in Black and White People

The rate of multiple sclerosis (MS) cases varies greatly by race and ethnicity. A new study suggests that the prevalence of MS in Black and white people is similarly high, while much lower in Hispanic and Asian people. The research is published in the April 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM): What Parents Should Know

This rare inflammatory neurological condition requires specialized treatment and may have a link to COVID-19. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is an inflammatory neurological condition that affects the brain and spinal cord and is seen primarily in children. ADEM is often preceded by a viral infection, and in dozens of cases diagnosed since the beginning of the pandemic, the coronavirus has been identified as a likely trigger.

Faster Accumulation of Cardiovascular Risk Factors Linked to Increased Dementia Risk

Cardiovascular disease risk factors, like high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity and smoking, are believed to play key roles in the likelihood of developing cognitive decline, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. A new study suggests that people who accumulate these risk factors over time, at a faster pace, have an increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease dementia or vascular dementia, compared to people whose risk factors remain stable throughout life. The research is published in the April 20, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

An Anti-Inflammatory Diet May Be Your Best Bet for Cognitive Health

As people age, inflammation within their immune system increases, damaging cells. A new study shows that people who consumed an anti-inflammatory diet that includes more fruits, vegetables, beans, and tea or coffee, had a lower risk of developing dementia later in life. The research is published in the November 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Burning and Tingling in Your Feet? You May Have Small Fiber Neuropathy

The number of people experiencing numbness, tingling and pain in their feet with no known cause has been increasing over the last two decades, according at a new study published in the October 27, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Called small fiber neuropathy, the condition has different symptoms than large fiber neuropathy, which can cause weakness and balance issues. But in many cases people have both types of neuropathy.

Study: Death Rate from Parkinson’s Rising in U.S.

A new study shows that in the last two decades the death rate from Parkinson’s disease has risen about 63% in the United States. The research is published in the October 27, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that the death rate was twice as high in men as in women, and there was a higher death rate in white people than other racial/ethnic groups.

Does A Lifetime of Vigorous Exercise Increase the Risk of Developing ALS?

There is debate over whether vigorous physical activity is a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A new study suggests it depends on whether that vigorous activity you get over your lifetime happens on the job or during leisure time. The research is published in the October 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

KERRY H. LEVIN, MD SELECTED FOR THE 2021 DISTINGUISHED PHYSICIAN AWARD FROM AANEM

AANEM chooses one member each year who has provided distinguished service over the course of their career as a clinician and/or educator in support of AANEM activities. Kerry H. Levin, MD has been chosen for his commitment as both a clinician and an educator.

McCullough wins AHA/ASA Neuroscience Visionary Award

Her scientific leadership in the laboratory studying sex differences in stroke severity and outcomes is among the reasons why Louise McCullough, MD, PhD, received the 2021 C. Miller Fisher, MD Neuroscience Visionary Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA).

5 Henry Ford Hospitals Earn Top Quality Recognition for Stroke Care Excellence

All of Henry Ford Health System’s five hospitals that are equipped to treat stroke earned Gold Plus and Honor Roll status for stroke care excellence from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

Jersey Shore University Medical Center Surgeon’s Research on the Phrenic Nerve Reconstruction Surgery He Pioneered Published in the Annals of Plastic Surgery

Study results, supporting the efficacy of phrenic nerve
reconstruction surgery, from Matthew Kaufman, M.D., FACS, and colleagues at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center were recently published in the Annals of Plastic Surgery.

People with Parkinson’s May Benefit from 7 Walking Strategies

Various strategies can help people with Parkinson’s who have difficulty walking, but a new study finds that many people have never heard of or tried these strategies. The research is published in the September 8, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that how well different compensation strategies worked depended on the context in which they were used, such as indoors versus outdoors, under time pressure or not.

Family of proteins offers promise as ischemic stroke treatment, preclinical trial finds

Boosting a family of naturally occurring proteins that dampens inflammation in the body has been shown to be effective in reducing damage from an ischemic stroke, according to preclinical researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Study finds recent change in EMS transport policy could improve stroke outcomes

A new EMS transport policy implemented in Chicago showed that sending patients suspected of experiencing large vessel occlusion directly to comprehensive stroke centers led to an increase in the use of endovascular therapy, an important treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

Understanding Alzheimer’s Progression with Improvements to Imaging, Image Processing, Machine Learning

Because there is no ethical way to extract brain tissue from patients to look for clues about how amyloid plaques and protein aggregates proliferate, supplementary techniques are needed to better understand the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. During ACA’s 71st annual meeting, Abdullah Al Bashit, from Northeastern University, will discuss using computational techniques to help address these challenges. His work demonstrates how using small and wide-angle scattering along with state-of-the-art detection techniques will help probe the molecular structure and proliferation.

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Increased Risk of Second Stroke, Death

People with larger waistlines, high blood pressure and other risk factors that make up metabolic syndrome may be at higher risk for having a second stroke and even dying than people who do not have metabolic syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Study: Adding Color to Your Plate May Lower Risk of Cognitive Decline

A new study shows that people who eat a diet that includes at least half a serving per day of foods high in flavonoids like strawberries, oranges, peppers and apples may have a 20% lower risk of cognitive decline. The research is published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at several types of flavonoids, and found that flavones and anthocyanins may have the most protective effect.

Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.