Sports Medicine Physician Available to Comment on Concussion Following Tua Tagovailoa’s Injury

Following last night’s concussion of Miami Dolphins football star Tua Tagovailoa, one sports medicine physician is reminding sports fans and athletes alike about the dangers of head injuries.  “Watching the frightening moment when Tua Tagovailoa was violently tackled and landed…

CHOP Study Explores the Use of Telemedicine in Child Neurology in Largest Study to Date

Researchers found that across nearly 50,000 visits, patients continued to use telemedicine effectively even with the reopening of outpatient clinics a year after the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, prominent barriers for socially vulnerable families and racial and ethnic minorities persist, suggesting more work is required to reach a wider population with telemedicine.

RUSH, Franciscan to Partner on Clinical Services for Cancer, Neurosciences

Chicago-based Rush University System for Health and Franciscan Alliance, Inc., are partnering to jointly develop and provide clinical services to improve the availability of health care to patients in Northwest Indiana, giving patients streamlined access to subspecialty care in their own communities.

UM School of Medicine Brain and Tissue Bank to Receive $800,000 to Expand Research Initiatives and Outreach on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)

The University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) will receive an $800,000 donation to be used by the University of Maryland Brain and Tissue Bank to advance research into the treatment and cure of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), commonly referred to as Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

Mayo Clinic expert provides tips for reducing dementia risk

More than 55 million people worldwide are believed to be living with dementia, according to the World Health Organization. Ronald Petersen, M.D., a neurologist and director of Mayo Clinic’s Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center, says you can’t prevent dementia, but you can reduce your risk.

Health Care Spending May Help Explain Link Between MS and Latitude

Researchers have known people who live farther from the equator are more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) and have often attributed that to vitamin D exposure. But countries farther from the equator are also more likely to be wealthier than countries nearer to the equator. A new analysis shows that the amount a country spends on health care may help explain the link between MS and latitude. This new research is published in the August 24, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Screening and treatment bring hope for children with spinal muscular atrophy

Before available treatments existed, children with the most common form of spinal muscular atrophy would would need a ventilator to breathe or die by the age of two. Now, several advancements have made SMA a treatable condition. While many states screen for it at birth, physicians and advocates say even more can be done to improve outcomes for SMA.

Mayo Clinic Healthcare expert explains when swallowing issues are more than an accident

Many people have experienced the discomfort of food or a beverage accidentally going to the wrong place when swallowing. But swallowing issues sometimes become chronic and may be a sign of a health condition that should be treated.

Pregnant Women with Epilepsy Have More Depression, Anxiety Symptoms

Pregnant women with epilepsy have more symptoms of depression and anxiety during pregnancy and postpartum than pregnant women who do not have epilepsy or women with epilepsy who are not pregnant, according to a study published in the August 17, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Quality of Life with Multiple Sclerosis May Depend on Several Factors

Quality of life is a measure of a person’s level of comfort, health and happiness. For people with multiple sclerosis (MS), a new study has found there are specific factors that may affect a person’s physical and mental quality of life. The study is published in the August 10, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Eating More Ultra-processed Foods Associated with Increased Risk of Dementia

People who eat the highest amounts of ultra-processed foods like soft drinks, chips and cookies may have a higher risk of developing dementia than those who eat the lowest amounts, according to a new study published in the July 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers also found that replacing ultra-processed foods in a person’s diet with unprocessed or minimally processed foods was associated with a lower risk. The study does not prove that ultra-processed foods cause dementia. It only shows an association.

Study: Chores, Exercise, and Social Visits Linked to Lower Risk of Dementia

Physical and mental activities, such as household chores, exercise, and visiting with family and friends, may help lower the risk of dementia, according to a new study published in the July 27, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at the effects of these activities, as well as mental activities and use of electronic devices in people both with and without higher genetic risk for dementia.

Artificial Intelligence in Personalized Medicine, Genomic Sequencing Advances, Human Brain Organogenesis, Building Trust with Patients, Guiding Patient Decisions with Mass Spectrometry, and Much More to Be Explored at 2022 AACC

At the 2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, laboratory medicine experts will present the cutting-edge research and technology that is revolutionizing clinical testing and patient care.

Several Hospitals in University Hospitals System Recognized by American Heart Association for Quality Stroke Care

Several hospitals in the University Hospitals health system have been recognized by the American Heart Association (AHA) for their quality stroke care. The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke Quality Achievement Awards, achieved by UH medical centers, recognizes their commitment to ensuring stroke patients receive the most appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence.

Is Stroke Linked to Depression Before it Occurs?

While depression is a common problem for people who have had a stroke, some people may have symptoms of depression years before their stroke, according to a study published in the July 13, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers found that, in people who developed a stroke, symptoms of depression preceded the onset of stroke and further worsened after the stroke.

Study: Liver Disease Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia

People who have non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a buildup of fat cells in the liver, may have a higher risk of dementia, according to a new study published in the July 13, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers also found that people with this form of liver disease who also have heart disease or who have had a stroke may have an even higher risk of dementia.

American Neurological Association Announces Winners of 2022 Awards for Outstanding Accomplishments in Academic Neurology and Neuroscience

The American Neurological Association (ANA) has announced the recipients of its 2022 scientific awards, to be presented during the 147th ANA Annual Meeting, which will be held October 22–25, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois.

Doctors with Texas Comprehensive Epilepsy Program lead 22-year-old Tyler resident to seizure freedom

Elisabeth Gentry had experienced auras ever since she was a toddler, but she didn’t learn that the occasional strange tastes in her mouth and feelings of impending doom were epilepsy until 2015, when she was 15 years old and suffered a grand mal seizure.

Preliminary Study: Blood Treatment is Safe, May Help Treat Stiff Person Syndrome

Stiff person syndrome spectrum disorders are rare autoimmune and neurological disorders that most often cause muscle stiffness and spasms in the torso and limbs. According to a small, preliminary study released today, a blood treatment called plasmapheresis, also known as therapeutic plasma exchange, may be a safe way to treat stiff person syndrome spectrum disorders. The research will be presented at the new American Academy of Neurology Summer Conference: Autoimmune Neurology and Neurology Year in Review in San Francisco, July 15 to 16, 2022. Researchers also found that many study participants also experienced an improvement in symptoms or function, or both, while being treated with this therapy.

Thyroid Problems Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

Older people with hypothyroidism, also called underactive thyroid, may be at increased risk of developing dementia, according to a study published in the July 6, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The risk of developing dementia was even higher for people whose thyroid condition required thyroid hormone replacement medication.

Bike Helmets: Finding the Right Fit For Your Child

Follow these tips to make sure your child’s helmet is safe. A bike helmet can literally be a lifesaver for a child—dramatically reducing the chances of a head or brain injury from a bike, scooter or skateboard accident. But did you know that a helmet has to fit right to do its job? If it’s too small, too loose, or not positioned correctly, it may not protect your child.

Hackensack Meridian Children’s Health Pediatric Neurologist Studying Concussion Recovery in Children

Pediatric neurologist Felicia Gliksman, D.O., MPH, FAAN, director of the Pediatric and Adult Concussion Center at Joseph M. Sanzari Children’s Hospital at Hackensack University Medical Center, and vice chair of the Department of Neurology at Hackensack Meridian School of Medicine, is serving as principal investigator and investigator for two studies related to recovery from brain injury.

All Five Henry Ford Health Hospitals Earn Highest Quality Recognition for Stroke Care from American Heart Association and American Stroke Association

All five hospitals of Henry Ford Health, which are equipped to treat stroke, earned Get with the Guidelines® – Stroke Gold Plus and Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite status for stroke care excellence from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association. This top-quality achievement recognizes Henry Ford’s commitment to ensuring patients with stroke receive the most appropriate and timely treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines grounded in the latest scientific evidence.

Hospital Infantil de Los Ángeles: La mejor atención para niños en California y el Pacífico de los EE.UU.

U.S. News ha clasificado de nuevo al CHLA como el mejor hospital pediátrico en el estado de California y en el Pacífico de los Estados Unidos, una región que abarca los estados de Alaska, California, Hawái, Oregón y Washington. El CHLA también se encuentra en el cuadro de honor anual de la publicación de los mejores hospitales para niños por decimocuarto año consecutivo, todos los años desde el inicio de la clasificación, en donde obtuvo el puesto n. 8 en los Estados Unidos en esta muestra de los principales destinos del país para la atención médica pediátrica.

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles: 美国加州和太平洋地区最好的儿童护理机构

《美国新闻与世界报道》再次将 CHLA 评为其本州加利福尼亚州和美国太平洋地区(包括阿拉斯加州、加利福尼亚州、夏威夷州、俄勒冈州和华盛顿州)的最佳儿童医院。CHLA 还连续 14 年(自该排名诞生以来从未缺席)入选该刊年度“最佳儿童医院榜”——美国领先儿科机构权威榜单——最终名列第 8 位。

Does Shingles Increase a Person’s Risk of Dementia?

Shingles, a viral infection caused by the reactivation of the chickenpox virus, results in a painful blistering rash along one side of the body or face from nerve inflammation. There has been scientific speculation that such inflammation may increase a person’s risk of dementia. However, a new study has found that shingles is not associated with an increased risk of dementia. The study is published in the June 8, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Social Isolation May Impact Brain Volume in Regions Linked to Higher Risk of Dementia

Social isolation is linked to lower brain volume in areas related to cognition and a higher risk of dementia, according to research published in the June 8, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study found that social isolation was linked to a 26% increased risk of dementia, separately from risk factors like depression and loneliness.

New study finds persistent viral shedding of COVID-19 is associated with delirium and six-month mortality in hospitalized COVID-19 patients

The Northwestern Medicine Neuro COVID-19 research team discovered patients who continued to test positive more than 14 days after their initial positive test were more likely to experience delirium, longer hospital stays, were less likely to be discharged home, and had a greater six-month mortality than those without persistent viral shedding of COVID-19.