Think About This: Keeping Your Brain Active May Delay Alzheimer’s Dementia 5 Years

Keeping your brain active in old age has always been a smart idea, but a new study suggests that reading, writing letters and playing card games or puzzles in later life may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s dementia by up to five years. The research is published in the July 14, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Innovative Gene Therapy ‘Reprograms’ Cells To Reverse Neurological Deficiencies

A new method of gene therapy is helping children born with a rare genetic disorder called AADC deficiency that causes severe physical and developmental disabilities. The study was led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Henry Ford Health System Therapeutic Choir Finds Its Voice Through COVID-19

DETROIT – Henry Ford Health System is using the healing power of singing to help patients with voice disorders that result from various medical conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke and vocal cord paralysis to help improve their voices. Patients in a therapeutic choir called the Motor City Upbeats regain their vocal strength and range and breathing through a series of simple exercises and techniques taught in a welcoming, cheerful environment where just hearing the sound of your voice is music to the ears.

Laboratorios de Mayo Clinic detectan nueva enfermedad autoinmunitaria vinculada al cáncer de testículo

Los Laboratorios de Mayo Clinic pusieron en marcha la primera prueba autoinmunitaria en su clase para el anticuerpo contra la proteína tipo Kelch 11 (KLHL11), que sirve para detectar una enfermedad autoinmunitaria relacionada con el cáncer de testículo. La prueba está disponible a nivel nacional e internacional.

After Stroke, More than One Try to Remove Blood Clots May Be Tied to Worse Outcome

After a stroke, doctors can try to remove clots in blood vessels to keep blood flowing freely to the brain. But even though most of these procedures are successful, less than half of people have a successful recovery from the stroke. A new study published in the June 23, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, sheds light on why that may be.

Researchers Identify New Gene that May Increase Risk of ALS

Researchers have identified a new gene that may increase a person’s risk of developing ALS, according to a new study published in the June 16, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The gene, called TP73, produces a protein to help regulate the life cycle of a cell. Researchers found that some people with ALS have mutations in this gene and that the mutations may interfere with nerve cell health.

Brain Cell Membranes’ Lipids May Play Big Role in Alzheimer’s Progression

Links between lipid imbalance and disease have been established, in which lipid changes increase the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. This imbalance inspired researchers to explore the role of lipids comprising the cellular membranes of brain cells. In Biointerphases, the researchers report on the significant role lipids may play in regulating C99, a protein within the amyloid pathway, and disease progression.

Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

-Physician and Musician: Johns Hopkins Doctor Brings Passion for Music to Medicine During Pandemic
-Rapid, At-Home Blood Test Could Confirm COVID-19 Vaccination in Minutes
-What to Expect and Prepare for As You Return to Regular Health Care Appointments
-Study Suggests Sudden Hearing Loss Not Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination
-Vaccination May Not Rid COVID-19 Risk for Those with Rheumatic, Musculoskeletal Diseases

Concussion with Loss of Consciousness May Be Linked to Life with Some Disability

People who have had a concussion where they lost consciousness may be more likely to have some disability or limitations later in life—such as difficulty walking or limitations in the amount or type of work they can do—than people who have never had a concussion, according to a study published in the May 26, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Penn Medicine Launches Region’s First Post-COVID-19 Neurological Care Clinic

As many as one in three COVID-19 survivors experience a mental health or neurological disorder, adding to a growing body of evidence that show COVID-19 can have serious and potentially long-lasting effects on the brain. The Penn Neuro COVID Clinic aims to assess and treat long-haul COVID patients suffering from neurological symptoms.

New Finding Suggests Cognitive Problems Caused by Repeat Mild Head Hits Could Be Treated

A neurologic pathway by which non-damaging but high frequency brain impact blunts normal brain function and causes long-term problems with learning and memory has been identified. The finding suggests that tailored drug therapy can be designed and developed to reactivate and normalize cognitive function, say neuroscientists at Georgetown University Medical Center.

What Parkinson’s Disease Patients Reveal About How Art is Experienced and Valued

Altered neural functioning, like that experienced in patients with Parkinson’s disease, changes the way art is both perceived and valued. People with neurological motor dysfunction demonstrated decreased experiences of motion in abstract art and enhanced preferences for high-motion art, compared to a healthy control group.

Exercise May Help Slow Cognitive Decline in Some People with Parkinson’s Disease

For people with Parkinson’s disease, problems with thinking and memory skills are among the most common nonmotor symptoms of the disease. A new study shows that exercise may help slow cognitive decline for some people with the disease. The study is published in the March 31, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

National Neurosurgery Organizations Collaborate to Establish Professionalism Policy for Meetings, Professional Events

Ellen Air, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Neurosurgery Residency Program at Henry Ford Health System and Chair-Elect of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) Joint Section on Women in Neurosurgery, is co-author of a new Professionalism and Harassment Model Policy created to provide a code of ethical behavior that promotes professional growth and the free exchange of ideas at neurosurgical meetings, educational courses, conferences and other sponsored events.

Doubling Down on Headache Pain

It’s not uncommon for people who experience a concussion to have moderate to severe headaches in the weeks after the injury. A new study has found a combination of two drugs, both common anti-nausea medications, given intravenously in the emergency room may relieve those headaches better than a placebo. The study is published in the March 24, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Leaky Blood-Brain Barrier Linked to Brain Tissue Damage in Brain Aging Disease

As people age, changes in the tiniest blood vessels in the brain, a condition called cerebral small vessel disease, can lead to thinking and memory problems and stroke. These changes can also affect the blood-brain barrier, a layer of cells that protect the brain from toxins circulating in the blood. Now a new study has found that people with cerebral small vessel disease who have blood-brain barrier leakage had more brain tissue damage over two years than people with less blood-brain barrier leakage. The study is published in the March 24, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Heart Health Problems in Your 20s May Affect Thinking Skills Decades Later

People in their 20s and 30s who have health issues such as high blood pressure, obesity and high blood glucose levels may be more likely to have problems with thinking and memory skills decades later than those without these health issues, according to a study published in the March 17, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Medicare Paid 50% More for Neurology Drugs Over 5 Years While Claims Rose Only 8%

A new study of Medicare payments has found that over a five-year period, the payments for medications prescribed to people with neurologic conditions like multiple sclerosis (MS), Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy increased by 50% while the number of claims for these prescription medications only rose by only 8%. The study is published in the March 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Do Epilepsy Medications Taken During Pregnancy Affect a Child’s Development?

Children born to women taking certain medications for epilepsy during pregnancy have no developmental delays at age three when compared to children of healthy women without epilepsy, according to a preliminary study released today, March 4, 2021, that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021. Most of the women with epilepsy in the study took either lamotrigine or levetiracetam during their pregnancy, or a combination of the two.

Get into the Swing: Golf May Have More Benefit for Parkinson’s than Tai Chi

When it comes to exercise that does the most good for people with Parkinson’s disease, golf may hit above par when compared to tai chi. That’s according to a preliminary study released today, March 3, 2021, that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to April 22, 2021. The study found that golf was better than tai chi for improving balance and mobility.

Could Rising Temperatures Send More People with MS to the Hospital?

As average temperatures around the globe climb, a preliminary study has found people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may expect worsening symptoms, enough to send them to the hospital more often. The preliminary study released today, March 2, 2021, will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to April 22, 2021.

Can Cannabis Use Lead to Rebound Headaches for People with Migraine?

Using cannabis for relief from migraine headache may be associated with developing “rebound” headache, or medication overuse headache, which occurs when pain medication is overused by patients who have an underlying primary headache disorder such as migraine, according to a preliminary study released today March 1, 2021, that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021.

Do Commonly Prescribed Antidepressants Increase the Risk of Bleeding Stroke?

There is good news for people who take antidepressants called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), the most commonly prescribed antidepressants in the United States. A new preliminary study has found that they are not associated with an increased risk of intracerebral hemorrhage, the deadliest kind of stroke. The preliminary study released today, February 25, 2021, will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021.

Does It Matter What Position You Play When It Comes to CTE?

Contrary to popular belief, a position played in collision sports like football and hockey may not raise an athlete’s risk for developing brain disease later, a new study finds. Researchers also found no link between the length of their career, and their risk of degenerative brain disease, according to a study published in the February 24, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Additionally, only about half of the athletes studied showed evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

Do People with Migraine Get Enough Exercise?

More than two-thirds of people with migraine do not get enough exercise, according to a preliminary study released today, February 23, 2021, that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology’s 73rd Annual Meeting being held virtually April 17 to 22, 2021. The study found that people who do get a minimum of two-and-a-half hours of moderate to vigorous exercise a week had a reduced rate of migraine triggers like stress, depression and sleep problems.

Expert Alert: Encephalitis prevention another reason to receive COVID-19 vaccine

Patients with COVID-19 are at risk for neurologic complications, including encephalitis, or inflammation of the brain.

“Encephalitis cases have been reported in patients with COVID-19, although on the whole it appears to be a relatively rare complication,” says Michel Toledano, M.D., a Mayo Clinic neurologist.

In the case of encephalitis caused by communicable diseases for which there is a vaccine available, getting vaccinated is the best way of preventing the disease.

First-in-Human Clinical Trial to Assess Gene Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

UC San Diego researchers have launched a first-in-human Phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a gene therapy to deliver a key protein into the brains of persons with Alzheimer’s disease or Mild Cognitive Impairment, a condition that often precedes full-blown dementia.

Press and Media Registration is Open for 2021 AAN Annual Meeting

No matter where you are in the world, the 2021 AAN Annual Meeting is one click away. Journalists can now register to attend the 73rd Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) being held virtually April 17-22, 2021. The AAN Annual Meeting is the world’s largest gathering of neurologists who come together to share the latest advances in neurologic research.

Can Strep Throat Make Tics Worse in Kids?

Exposure to the bacteria that causes strep throat does not appear to make Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders worse in children and teens, according to a study published in the February 10, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, exposure was associated with increased symptoms of . Previous studies have suggested a possible link between strep infection and tic and behavioral disorders.