Does A Lifetime of Vigorous Exercise Increase the Risk of Developing ALS?

There is debate over whether vigorous physical activity is a risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). A new study suggests it depends on whether that vigorous activity you get over your lifetime happens on the job or during leisure time. The research is published in the October 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

KERRY H. LEVIN, MD SELECTED FOR THE 2021 DISTINGUISHED PHYSICIAN AWARD FROM AANEM

AANEM chooses one member each year who has provided distinguished service over the course of their career as a clinician and/or educator in support of AANEM activities. Kerry H. Levin, MD has been chosen for his commitment as both a clinician and an educator.

McCullough wins AHA/ASA Neuroscience Visionary Award

Her scientific leadership in the laboratory studying sex differences in stroke severity and outcomes is among the reasons why Louise McCullough, MD, PhD, received the 2021 C. Miller Fisher, MD Neuroscience Visionary Award from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA).

5 Henry Ford Hospitals Earn Top Quality Recognition for Stroke Care Excellence

All of Henry Ford Health System’s five hospitals that are equipped to treat stroke earned Gold Plus and Honor Roll status for stroke care excellence from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

Jersey Shore University Medical Center Surgeon’s Research on the Phrenic Nerve Reconstruction Surgery He Pioneered Published in the Annals of Plastic Surgery

Study results, supporting the efficacy of phrenic nerve
reconstruction surgery, from Matthew Kaufman, M.D., FACS, and colleagues at Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center were recently published in the Annals of Plastic Surgery.

People with Parkinson’s May Benefit from 7 Walking Strategies

Various strategies can help people with Parkinson’s who have difficulty walking, but a new study finds that many people have never heard of or tried these strategies. The research is published in the September 8, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that how well different compensation strategies worked depended on the context in which they were used, such as indoors versus outdoors, under time pressure or not.

Family of proteins offers promise as ischemic stroke treatment, preclinical trial finds

Boosting a family of naturally occurring proteins that dampens inflammation in the body has been shown to be effective in reducing damage from an ischemic stroke, according to preclinical researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Study finds recent change in EMS transport policy could improve stroke outcomes

A new EMS transport policy implemented in Chicago showed that sending patients suspected of experiencing large vessel occlusion directly to comprehensive stroke centers led to an increase in the use of endovascular therapy, an important treatment for acute ischemic stroke.

Understanding Alzheimer’s Progression with Improvements to Imaging, Image Processing, Machine Learning

Because there is no ethical way to extract brain tissue from patients to look for clues about how amyloid plaques and protein aggregates proliferate, supplementary techniques are needed to better understand the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. During ACA’s 71st annual meeting, Abdullah Al Bashit, from Northeastern University, will discuss using computational techniques to help address these challenges. His work demonstrates how using small and wide-angle scattering along with state-of-the-art detection techniques will help probe the molecular structure and proliferation.

Metabolic Syndrome Linked to Increased Risk of Second Stroke, Death

People with larger waistlines, high blood pressure and other risk factors that make up metabolic syndrome may be at higher risk for having a second stroke and even dying than people who do not have metabolic syndrome, according to a meta-analysis published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Study: Adding Color to Your Plate May Lower Risk of Cognitive Decline

A new study shows that people who eat a diet that includes at least half a serving per day of foods high in flavonoids like strawberries, oranges, peppers and apples may have a 20% lower risk of cognitive decline. The research is published in the July 28, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study looked at several types of flavonoids, and found that flavones and anthocyanins may have the most protective effect.

Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

UT Southwestern Among Top 25 in Nation in Eight Specialties Ranked By U.S. News ‘Best Hospitals’

UT Southwesternonce again is ranked the No. 1 hospital in Dallas-Fort Worth – the nation’s fourth-largest metro area – among 132 regional hospitals and second in Texas among 566 hospitals for the fifth consecutive year. The recognition comes several months after UT Southwestern completed expansion of its William P. Clements Jr. University Hospital.

UC San Diego Health Ranked #1 by U.S. News & World Report

UC San Diego Health, the region’s only academic health system, is ranked #1 in San Diego and #5 in California, placing it among the nation’s best hospitals, according to the 2021-2022 U.S. News & World Report survey. UC San Diego Health was ranked in the top 50 in 10 specialties.

Rush University Medical Center Again on U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll

Of the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals evaluated, Rush University Medical Center ranked No. 19 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report, with nine of specialties rated among the country’s very best.

Think About This: Keeping Your Brain Active May Delay Alzheimer’s Dementia 5 Years

Keeping your brain active in old age has always been a smart idea, but a new study suggests that reading, writing letters and playing card games or puzzles in later life may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s dementia by up to five years. The research is published in the July 14, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Innovative Gene Therapy ‘Reprograms’ Cells To Reverse Neurological Deficiencies

A new method of gene therapy is helping children born with a rare genetic disorder called AADC deficiency that causes severe physical and developmental disabilities. The study was led by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and The Ohio State University College of Medicine.

Henry Ford Health System Therapeutic Choir Finds Its Voice Through COVID-19

DETROIT – Henry Ford Health System is using the healing power of singing to help patients with voice disorders that result from various medical conditions such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke and vocal cord paralysis to help improve their voices. Patients in a therapeutic choir called the Motor City Upbeats regain their vocal strength and range and breathing through a series of simple exercises and techniques taught in a welcoming, cheerful environment where just hearing the sound of your voice is music to the ears.

Laboratorios de Mayo Clinic detectan nueva enfermedad autoinmunitaria vinculada al cáncer de testículo

Los Laboratorios de Mayo Clinic pusieron en marcha la primera prueba autoinmunitaria en su clase para el anticuerpo contra la proteína tipo Kelch 11 (KLHL11), que sirve para detectar una enfermedad autoinmunitaria relacionada con el cáncer de testículo. La prueba está disponible a nivel nacional e internacional.

After Stroke, More than One Try to Remove Blood Clots May Be Tied to Worse Outcome

After a stroke, doctors can try to remove clots in blood vessels to keep blood flowing freely to the brain. But even though most of these procedures are successful, less than half of people have a successful recovery from the stroke. A new study published in the June 23, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, sheds light on why that may be.

Researchers Identify New Gene that May Increase Risk of ALS

Researchers have identified a new gene that may increase a person’s risk of developing ALS, according to a new study published in the June 16, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The gene, called TP73, produces a protein to help regulate the life cycle of a cell. Researchers found that some people with ALS have mutations in this gene and that the mutations may interfere with nerve cell health.

Brain Cell Membranes’ Lipids May Play Big Role in Alzheimer’s Progression

Links between lipid imbalance and disease have been established, in which lipid changes increase the formation of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. This imbalance inspired researchers to explore the role of lipids comprising the cellular membranes of brain cells. In Biointerphases, the researchers report on the significant role lipids may play in regulating C99, a protein within the amyloid pathway, and disease progression.

Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

-Physician and Musician: Johns Hopkins Doctor Brings Passion for Music to Medicine During Pandemic
-Rapid, At-Home Blood Test Could Confirm COVID-19 Vaccination in Minutes
-What to Expect and Prepare for As You Return to Regular Health Care Appointments
-Study Suggests Sudden Hearing Loss Not Associated with COVID-19 Vaccination
-Vaccination May Not Rid COVID-19 Risk for Those with Rheumatic, Musculoskeletal Diseases