Researchers Wrestle with Accuracy of AI Technology Used to Create New Drug Candidates

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine, UCSF, Stanford, and Harvard determined that a protein prediction technology can yield accurate results in the hunt to efficiently find the best possible drug candidates for many conditions.

Researchers Engineer Yeast to Transport Medicines and Lower Inflammation for Potential Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Researchers at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the UNC School of Medicine have engineered a probiotic yeast that enhances probiotic absorption in the gut and has the ability to suppress and even reverse inflammation in animals.

Simulation reveals new mechanism for membrane fusion

An intricate simulation performed by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers using one of the world’s most powerful supercomputers sheds new light on how proteins called SNAREs cause biological membranes to fuse.

UTSW discovers protective ‘acid wall’ formed by cancer cells

Cancer cells release a significantly more concentrated level of acid than previously known, forming an “acid wall” that could deter immune cells from attacking tumors, UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists show in a new study.

Nanoparticles developed at UTSW effectively fight tumors

A nanoparticle-based therapy developed by UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists stimulated an immune pathway that eradicated tumors in mouse models of various cancer types. Their findings, published in Science Immunology, offer a new way to potentially harness the power of the body’s immune system against cancer.

Hahn Awarded CZI Grant to Monitor, Manipulate Proteins Important in Nervous System Function, Neurological Disease

Klaus Hahn, PhD, the Ronald G. Thurman Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology at the UNC School of Medicine, will co-lead this Chan Zuckerberg Initiative project with colleagues at Duke University and North Carolina State University.

Study Could Help Clear Up Confusion and Hesitancy Surrounding RSV Vaccines

Efforts to vaccinate vulnerable populations against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) faced an uphill battle this season. However, now a new study by researchers at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) could help to combat RSV vaccine misinformation and quell vaccine…

Pharmacology Expert Comments on RSV Vaccination Errors

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that some pregnant Americans may have been given the wrong RSV vaccine, and some young children received a vaccine approved for use in adults only.  Now, a pharmacology expert at New York Institute…

Researchers Show SARS-Cov-2 Infection Affects Energy Stores in the Body, Causing Organ Failure

An international research team, including Jonathan C. Schisler, PhD, in the UNC School of Medicine, has found how SARS-CoV-2 causes widespread “energy outages” throughout major organs, and how these effects contribute to debilitating long COVID symptoms.

Researchers use Argonne X-rays to find the best antibodies

Antibody therapies are only effective if the antibodies do what we want them to do. This research can help scientists determine if an antibody is likely to stick to something other than the intended target, which should lessen the amount of time wasted with overly sticky antibodies.

UT Southwestern scientists discover agent that reverses effects of intoxication

A shot of a liver-produced hormone called FGF21 sobered up mice that had passed out from alcohol, allowing them to regain consciousness and coordination much faster than those that didn’t receive this treatment, UT Southwestern researchers report in a new study. The findings, published in Cell Metabolism, could lead to effective treatments for acute alcohol intoxication, which is responsible for about 1 million emergency room visits in the U.S. each year.

Researchers Uncover Mechanisms of Brexanolone and the Role of Inflammation in Post-partum Depression

Brexanolone, an IV infusion comprised of a derivative of progesterone, was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of PPD in 2019. The fast-acting medication significantly reduces depression symptoms and provides effects for up to 90 days. However, exactly how the drug provides these therapeutic effects has remained a mystery – until now.

How AI Can Help Design Drugs to Treat Opioid Addiction

ROCKVILLE, MD – Approximately three million Americans suffer from opioid use disorder, and every year more than 80,000 Americans die from overdoses. Opioid drugs, such as heroin, fentanyl, oxycodone and morphine, activate opioid receptors. Activating mu-opioid receptors leads to pain relief and euphoria, but also physical dependence and decreased breathing, the latter leading to death in the case of drug overdose.

CDC-UNC Collaboration Yields Potential Long-term HIV Protection

Since 2017, the lab of Rahima Benhabbour, PhD, MSc, associate professor in the UNC/NCSU Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been working with a research team at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and others at UNC to develop an injectable implant that can release HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) medications into the body for a long period of time.
Their latest research, published in Nature Communications, shows that the team’s latest formulation can provide up to six months of full protection.

New live bacterial product for stubborn superbug improves quality of life

Kevin Garey, professor of pharmacy practice and translational research at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy is reporting the first well-controlled study to demonstrate that a microbiome therapeutic, SER-109, is associated with significant quality of life improvement in patients with the debilitating recurrent infection and disease caused by Clostridium difficile (or C. diff).

UTSW Pharmacologist James Collins receives 2023 TAMEST Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award

James Collins III, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pharmacology at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will receive the 2023 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Biological Sciences from The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST) for broadening understanding of schistosomiasis.

Getting to the Heart of Chemotherapeutic Cardiotoxicity

On any given Tuesday, you will find Brian C. Jensen, MD, cardiologist and physician-scientist, tending to patients in his cardio-oncology clinic. His schedule is packed to the brim with cancer patients. But not patients with heart cancer. The largest number of patients he sees are cancer patients who have developed, or are at risk of developing, heart damage in response to their chemotherapy regimens.

People respond differently to psychedelic drugs — genetics could be the reason

Psychedelic drugs have shown benefits as treatments for cluster headaches, anxiety and depression in clinical studies, but not for everyone. Now, in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, researchers report that one reason could be common genetic variations in one serotonin receptor.

Smartphone App to Assess Stool Form, Rural-Urban Disparities in Cirrhosis Mortality, Lung Infection Risk in Severe Alcoholic Hepatitis in July Issue of AJG

The July issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology highlights new clinical science including using a smartphone app to assess stool form, rural-urban disparities in cirrhosis mortality, and lung infection risk in severe alcohol-related hepatitis. This issue also includes articles on pediatric IBD, therapy options for Crohn’s disease, a novel endoscopic suturing device, proton pump inhibitors, and more.

Do a Mom’s Medications Affect Her Breast Milk and Baby? New Center Investigates

UC San Diego School of Medicine receives $6.1M to launch a new research center studying the effects of maternal antibiotic use on breast milk and infant health. The center is funded by National Institutes of Health, as part of their new Maternal and Pediatric Precision in Therapeutics (MPRINT) Hub.

Speakers Announced for Virtual Experimental Biology 2021 Meeting

Renowned scientists—including Nobel laureates, research pioneers and celebrated educators—will speak at the virtual Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting, to be held April 27–30. Bringing together thousands of life scientists in one interdisciplinary community, EB showcases the latest advances in anatomy, biochemistry, molecular biology, investigative pathology, pharmacology and physiology.

Press Registration Now Open for Virtual Experimental Biology 2021 Meeting

Complimentary press passes are now available for the virtual Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting, to be held April 27–30. EB is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

10 ways Argonne science is combatting COVID-19

Argonne scientists and research facilities have made a difference in the fight against COVID-19 in the year since the first gene sequence for the virus was published.

Finding The Achilles’ Heel of A Killer Parasite

DALLAS – Sept. 24, 2020 – Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes – parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis. The findings, published online today in Science, could change the course of this disease that kills up to 250,000 people a year.

Seeing Corneal Degeneration in A New Light

DALLAS – June 17, 2020 – The molecular changes that lead to Fuchs’ endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) occur decades before the disease causes blurry vision and other noticeable symptoms in patients, new research by UT Southwestern scientists shows. This insight into this earliest stage of FECD may eventually lead to new ways of screening for and treating the common condition, which affects an estimated 4 percent of U.S. adults over the age of 40.

Argonne’s researchers and facilities playing a key role in the fight against COVID-19

Argonne scientists are working around the clock to analyze the virus to find new treatments and cures, predict how it will propagate through the population, and make sure that our supply chains remain intact.

Choosing Common Pain Relievers: It’s Complicated

About 29 million Americans use over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to treat pain. Every year in the U.S., NSAID use is attributed to approximately 100,000 hospitalizations and 17,000 deaths. All of these drugs have benefits and risks, but deciding which one to use is complicated for health care providers and their patients. To assist in clinical decision-making, researchers address cardiovascular risks and beyond, which include gastrointestinal and kidney side effects of pain relievers.