Genetics Researchers Find Easy Way to Improve Cancer Outcomes

By mining a vast trove of genetic data,researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are enhancing doctors’ ability to treat cancer, predict patient outcomes and determine which treatments will work best for individual patients. The researchers have identified inherited variations in our genes that affect how well a patient will do after diagnosis and during treatment.

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Understanding How COVID-19 Affects Children Vital to Slowing Pandemic, Doctors Say

Though COVID-19 so far appears to be largely sparing children, researchers are cautioning that it is critical to understand how the virus affects kids to model the pandemic accurately, limit the disease’s spread and ensure the youngest patients get the care they need.

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Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals Opens Call for 2021 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award

An announcement that the Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals is accepting letters of intent for the 2021 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award. The award offers inventive physician-scientists resources and expertise to advance their discoveries into medicines.

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The potentially deadly paradox of diabetes management

Diabetes affects nearly 1 in 10 adults in the U.S., of these millions, more than 90% have Type 2 diabetes. Controlling blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin levels ― or HbA1c, which is sometimes referred to as A1C ― is key to diabetes management and necessary to prevent its immediate and long-term complications. However, new Mayo Clinic research shows that diabetes management may be dangerously misaligned.

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Major Asian Gene Study to Help Doctors Battle Disease

“Under-representation of Asian populations in genetic studies has meant that medical relevance for more than half of the human population is reduced,” one researcher said.

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Potential Way to Halt Blinding Macular Degeneration Identified

It would be the first treatment for “dry” age-related macular degeneration and could significantly improve treatment for wet AMD.

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Many younger patients with stomach cancer have a distinct disease, Mayo research discovers

Many people under 60 who develop stomach cancer have a “genetically and clinically distinct” disease, new Mayo Clinic research has discovered. Compared to stomach cancer in older adults, this new, early onset form often grows and spreads more quickly, has a worse prognosis, and is more resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments.

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