New Study in Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation Explores Predictors of High School and College Graduation for Young People with Traumatic Brain Injury

“A broad range of efforts across society are needed to understand and combat racial inequity in the school systems to better support students with traumatic brain injury who come from ethnic and racial minority groups,” said Ashley Kakkanatt, MD, physical medicine and rehabilitation at Hackensack Meridian JFK Johnson Rehabilitation Institute and a coauthor of the study who worked on it during her fellowship training there. She now serves as an attending physician at JFK Johnson.

AOSSM Journals Receive Highest Impact Factors in Organization’s History

Scientific journal Impact Factors were just released this week by Clarivate and all three AOSSM Medical Publishing Group (MPG) journals achieved their highest rankings in the organization’s publication history. The Impact Factor (IF) is a measure of the frequency with which the average article in a journal has been cited in a particular year. It is used to measure the importance or rank of a journal by calculating the times its articles are cited.

University Hospitals and UC Irvine Announce New Co-Leadership of BraveNet, a Practice-Based Integrative Medicine Research Network

University Hospitals (UH) Connor Whole Health and Susan Samueli Integrative Health Institute (SSIHI) at University of California, Irvine have joined in collaboration to lead BraveNet — the first and largest whole health, practice-based research network in the U.S.

Hero’s Encounter: Leading Geriatrician and World War II Veteran Share Bond

An internationally renowned geriatrician and advocate for seniors and a 98-year-old World War II veteran hero are a dynamic duo whose paths recently crossed. They have a common bond: to improve care and quality of life for Americans and people throughout the world.

SHRO’s Giordano Meets with Appropriations Committee Chair on Capitol Hill

Professor Antonio Giordano, M.D., Ph.D., Neopolitan Oncologist, Director of the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research at Temple University and founder of the Sbarro Health Research Organization (SHRO), met today with Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), Chair of the House Appropriations Committee, at the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill.

Study may show why MS patients develop progressive disability but those with related diseases do not

Did you know multiple sclerosis (MS) means multiple scars? New research shows that the brain and spinal cord scars in people with MS may offer clues to why they developprogressive disability but those with related diseases where the immune system attacks the central nervous system do not.

In a study published in Neurology, Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues assessed if inflammation leads to permanent scarring in these three diseases:

Southwest National Primate Research Center at Texas Biomed receives $37 million NIH grant

The Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) at Texas Biomed has been awarded more than $37 million from the National Institutes of Health to continue operations into 2026. The P51 grant, given by the NIH Office of Research Infrastructure Programs, provides essential funding to house and care for nearly 2,500 non-human primates that are part of life-science research programs at Texas Biomed and partners around the globe.

Diversity Among Study Participants Credited with Identifying Gene Linked to Asthma

Researchers at Henry Ford Health System, as part of a national asthma collaborative, have identified a gene variant associated with childhood asthma that underscores the importance of including diverse patient populations in research studies.

The study is published in the print version of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

World-Renowned Interventional Cardiologist Establishes Structural Heart Disease Research Fund in Honor of Late Wife

William O’Neill, M.D., director of the Center for Structural Heart Disease at Henry Ford Health System, has donated $1 million to establish the Carol S. O’Neill Structural Heart Disease Research Fund at Henry Ford Health System in honor of his late wife, Carol, who passed away in 2019.

“This is how we can help” – Couple shares their story as COVID-19 clinical trial participants

“I don’t feel so great,” my husband, Brandon, said to me one Saturday afternoon – the last thing I wanted to hear after spending the last seven months tuned into COVID-19 media coverage. Knowing a few of his co-workers had recently tested positive for the virus, we didn’t wait to secure an appointment for a rapid test. When he called me an hour later to tell me he has tested positive, my heart sank.

Ultrasound Technique Offers More Precise, Quantified Assessments of Lung Health

Researchers have developed a technique that uses ultrasound to provide non-invasive assessments of pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary edema. The technique has been shown to both quantify lung scarring and detect lung fluid in rats. A study on pulmonary edema in humans is under way.

Harrington Discovery Institute Announces Award Recipients in New UK Rare Disease Program

Announcement of the 2021 Harrington UK Rare Disease Scholar Award recipients, their organizations and fields of research:

Pietro Fratta, MD, PhD – University College London
Gene Therapy for Kennedy’s Disease, a rare neuromuscular disease

Angela Russell, DPhil – University of Oxford
New Drugs for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Helen Waller-Evans, DPhil – Cardiff University
Novel Inhibitors to Treat Multiple Lysomal Storage Disorders, causes of widespread organ damage

Wyatt Yue, PhD – University of Oxford
Inhibitors of Primary Hyperoxaluria, a cause of kidney failure

Haiyan Zhou, MD, PhD – University College London
Novel Therapy for SPTLC1-Related Hereditary Sensory Neuropathy, a cause of shooting pain

Ohio State Study Shows Cardiac MRI Effective in Identifying Myocarditis in Athletes

A cardiac MRI is effective in identifying inflammation of the heart muscle in athletes and can help determine when those who have recovered from COVID-19 can safely return to play in competitive sports, according to a new study by researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center.

UChicago Medicine joins BOOST-3 national trial to investigate treatments for traumatic brain injuries

As part of nationwide study to improve trauma care for severe brain injuries, researchers at UChicago Medicine are working to engage South Side residents and ensure representation among underrepresented communities.

Clinical trials for potential COVID-19 vaccines need to include a more diverse roster of participants

Those who lead clinical trials for potential COVID-19 vaccines need to include more minorities. According to Marjorie A. Speers, executive director of non-profit Clinical Research Pathways and a former CDC official, Black and Latino patients are vastly under-represented in most…

The Eye, The Brain & The Auto: Call for Research Abstracts from Healthcare and Automotive Experts

The Detroit Institute of Ophthalmology, the research arm of the Henry Ford Health System Department of Ophthalmology, is accepting abstracts for The Eye, The Brain & The Auto 9th World Research Congress on Health and Modern Mobility: Autonomous Vehicles, Driver’s Fitness to Function, and Naturalistic Driving Methods to be held Dec. 7-8, 2020. This will be a virtual event.

Coronavirus knowledge needs to be shared freely, not kept secret by governments, corporations

Government agencies and medical institutions have been hit hard recently by hackers attempting to steal coronavirus research. The US and other countries are battling to keep their coronavirus innovations secret (or protect their research in other ways) partly because they…

Spinal cord injuries: Scientists probe individual cells to find better treatments

Two top scientists are seeking answers to questions about spinal cord injuries that have long frustrated the development of effective treatments.

Soup to Nuts

The COVID-19 pandemic demands action on many fronts, from prevention to testing to treatment. Not content to focus its research efforts on just one, the laboratory of George Church in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University is tackling the problem from seven different angles.

Epidemiology expert: Strive for diversity in COVID-19 vaccine/drug clinical trials

As clinical trials on potential vaccines and treatment drugs for the COVID-19 disease caused by the novel coronavirus get underway, researchers should strive for diversity in test subject selection, according to a leading expert on the topic. Marjorie A. Speers,…

Genetics Researchers Find Easy Way to Improve Cancer Outcomes

By mining a vast trove of genetic data,researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine are enhancing doctors’ ability to treat cancer, predict patient outcomes and determine which treatments will work best for individual patients. The researchers have identified inherited variations in our genes that affect how well a patient will do after diagnosis and during treatment.

Understanding How COVID-19 Affects Children Vital to Slowing Pandemic, Doctors Say

Though COVID-19 so far appears to be largely sparing children, researchers are cautioning that it is critical to understand how the virus affects kids to model the pandemic accurately, limit the disease’s spread and ensure the youngest patients get the care they need.

Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals Opens Call for 2021 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award

An announcement that the Harrington Discovery Institute at University Hospitals is accepting letters of intent for the 2021 Harrington Scholar-Innovator Award. The award offers inventive physician-scientists resources and expertise to advance their discoveries into medicines.

The potentially deadly paradox of diabetes management

Diabetes affects nearly 1 in 10 adults in the U.S., of these millions, more than 90% have Type 2 diabetes. Controlling blood sugar and glycosylated hemoglobin levels ― or HbA1c, which is sometimes referred to as A1C ― is key to diabetes management and necessary to prevent its immediate and long-term complications. However, new Mayo Clinic research shows that diabetes management may be dangerously misaligned.

Expert on #FDA’s #Expanded Access program: Cost can be a barrier to critically ill patients, healthcare providers, and others seeking to try experimental treatments as a last resort. Dr. Marjorie A. Speers available to comment or participate in inter

Costs related to the expanded access procedure under which critically ill patients can  try experimental drugs, biologics, and medical devices are often overlooked. These costs, according to Clinical Research Pathways Executive Director Marjorie A. Speers, Ph.D. can become a barrier for patients,…

Major Asian Gene Study to Help Doctors Battle Disease

“Under-representation of Asian populations in genetic studies has meant that medical relevance for more than half of the human population is reduced,” one researcher said.

Potential Way to Halt Blinding Macular Degeneration Identified

It would be the first treatment for “dry” age-related macular degeneration and could significantly improve treatment for wet AMD.

Expert in #expandedaccess to experimental drugs and diversity in clinical trials to speak at D.C. conf., and is available for interviews

An international expert in expanded access to experimental drugs, Marjorie A. Speers, Ph.D., will speak at the third annual Expanded Access Summit Jan. 27-29 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. Speers, a former CDC official, is the executive…

Many younger patients with stomach cancer have a distinct disease, Mayo research discovers

Many people under 60 who develop stomach cancer have a “genetically and clinically distinct” disease, new Mayo Clinic research has discovered. Compared to stomach cancer in older adults, this new, early onset form often grows and spreads more quickly, has a worse prognosis, and is more resistant to traditional chemotherapy treatments.

New Mayo Clinic studies to be presented at American Society of Hematology meeting

Mayo Clinic researchers will present findings at the American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting Dec. 7–10 in Orlando.
New Mayo Clinic studies to be presented include:
DNA analysis identifies elevated risk factor for myeloma in individuals of African ancestry
Study identifies more precise assessment measures for patients newly diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia
Researchers develop method to assess cancer-fighting cell therapy’s effectiveness

Researchers identify ‘Achilles’ heel’ of drug-resistant superbug

Researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) have identified a protein that allows vancomycin-resistant enterococci to defy antibiotic treatment and immune system attacks. Their discovery opens the door for future treatment options in the fight against antibiotic resistance.

Rutgers-led Team Launches Science and Medicine Research Initiative to Transform Health Care in New Jersey

At an event Thursday at Rutgers, thought leaders from academia, health care, government and the pharmaceutical industry discussed the future of scientific and clinical trial innovation in the state, as a result of an innovative consortium between Rutgers University, Princeton University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology.

Study finds associations between rheumatoid arthritis, other diseases before and after diagnosis

A Mayo Clinic-led study involving 3,276 patients has found that people with inflammatory bowel disease, Type 1 diabetes or blood clots may be at increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis. The study, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, also found that people who have rheumatoid arthritis are at increased risk of developing heart disease, blood clots and sleep apnea.

Experimental cholesterol-lowering drug effective at lowering bad cholesterol, study shows

Twice-yearly injections of an experimental cholesterol-lowering drug, inclisiran, were effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, often called bad cholesterol, in patients already taking the maximum dose of statin drugs, according to data of the ORION-10 trial presented Saturday, Nov. 16, at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019.

Dr. Shravani Mikkilineni Earns Top Honors in Ophthalmology Times® Research Scholar Program

Shravani Mikkilineni, M.D., MBA, resident physician in Henry Ford Health System’s Department of Ophthalmology, was recognized among the top five honorees in the third-annual Ophthalmology Times® Research Scholar Honoree Program, earning first place for her presented research, “T2 Magnetic Resonance Assay for Detection of Ocular Candidiasis.”

“Nudging” Heart Patients to Take Their Statins Leads to Better Medication Adherence and Better Patient Outcomes

In a new study presented to heart specialists from around the world, researchers at the Intermountain Healthcare Heart Institute in Salt Lake City found that simple “nudges” in the form of texts, emails and phone calls, not only help patients fill that first statin prescription, but also continue to help them take their medications over the long term.

Common early sign of cardiovascular disease also may indicate cancer risk, study finds

A Mayo Clinic-led study involving 488 cardiac patients whose cases were followed for up to 12 years finds that microvascular endothelial dysfunction, a common early sign of cardiovascular disease, is associated with a greater than twofold risk of cancer.

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, finds that microvascular endothelial dysfunction may be a useful marker for predicting risk of solid-tumor cancer, in addition to its known ability to predict more advanced cardiovascular disease, says Amir Lerman, M.D., a Mayo Clinic cardiologist and the study’s senior author.

Alzheimer’s subtypes could affect future treatments, Mayo Clinic researchers find

Despite decades of scientific scrutiny, Alzheimer’s disease researchers have yet to work out its cause or treatment. Understanding what underlies its three distinct subtypes is thought to be a promising new research avenue.

In a new study in JAMA Neurology, a team of neuroscientists at Mayo Clinic in Florida led by Melissa Murray, Ph.D., examined a key region of the brain and found that patterns of Alzheimer’s-related damage differed by subtype and age of onset.