Two University Hospitals Physician-Scientists to Receive 2024 Top Ten Clinical Research Achievement Awards from the Clinical Research Forum

Two University Hospitals physician-scientists will receive recognition for their profound contributions to advancing clinical research. UH is the only hospital system to have two honorees acknowledged this year by the Clinical Research Forum for the 10 most significant clinical advancements impacting the health and wellness of humanity.

Prof. Dr. Thanyavee Puthanakit, National Outstanding Researcher in Medical Science, with Clinical Research on the Treatment and Prevention of HIV in Youth

Prof. Dr. Thanyavee expressed her appreciation and honor for receiving the Outstanding Researcher Award.

Neutralizing antibodies that target resistant bacteria

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria pose a major challenge to healthcare systems worldwide. Due to numerous resistance mechanisms, infections with the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are particularly feared. Researchers at the German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), the University Hospital Cologne, the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in Braunschweig and the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf have now discovered antibodies that could lead to a highly potent treatment option of acute and chronic infections with P. aeruginosa. The study was published in the prestigious scientific journal Cell.

Share Your Research with the Respiratory Disease Community at ATS 2024 in San Diego

The American Thoracic Society is accepting scientific abstracts and case report submissions for presentation at the ATS 2024 International Conference in San Diego, May 17-22. Submissions on all aspects of respiratory disease, critical care medicine and sleep medicine will be considered and are due no later than Wednesday, Nov. 1, 2023, at 5 p.m. ET.

The Latest in Science and Medical Advancement in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery to be Presented at AAO-HNSF Annual Meeting

The latest research and advances in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery will be presented in Nashville, Tennessee, during the AAO-HNSF 2023 Annual Meeting & OTO Experience, September 30 – October 4.

Historical medicine suggests a new way to use modern treatments

The mixture of honey and vinegar, also known as oxymel, has been used as a medical treatment throughout history and now scientists have established that this combination could have modern applications in the treatment of wounds. New research is the first comprehensive exploration of how the mixture could be applied to modern medicine and improve treatments for infections.

CIHR chooses Digital Science to support discoveries for Canada’s health

Digital Science is pleased to announce that the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) has chosen Altmetric and Dimensions from Digital Science’s flagship products to support its belief that research has the power to change lives.

A Simple Antibacterial Treatment Solves a Severe Skin Problem Caused by Radiation Therapy

Acute radiation dermatitis (ARD)—characterized by red, sore, itchy or peeling skin—affects up to 95% of people undergoing radiation treatment for cancer. Severe cases can cause significant swelling and painful skin ulcers that can severely impair quality of life, yet little is known about why this condition occurs and no standardized treatments for preventing severe ARD have been widely adapted.

University Hospitals chosen to participate in a groundbreaking initiative to accelerate uptake of practice-changing evidence in health care

Announcement that the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) tapped University Hospitals (UH) as one of 42 health systems nationwide to carry out a pioneering initiative to accelerate the implementation of practice-changing research results in clinical care to improve patients’ outcomes.

UNC Health Provider Ushers in First FDA-Approved Medication for Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is an allergic condition of the esophagus that is on the rise throughout the United States. Patients with the condition typically have inflammation throughout their esophagus and trouble swallowing food – known as dysphagia.Without proper treatment, the lining of the esophagus becomes fibrous, and the passage becomes so narrowed, or strictured, that food can lodge in the esophagus, requiring medical attention.

Many middle-aged adults wary of taking part in studies of dementia prevention drugs

Drug companies and university-based teams are working urgently to find and test new medications that could prevent or slow the decline of brain function in older adults. But a new study suggests they’ll need to work harder to find volunteers for their clinical trials.

FAU Awarded $1 Million NIH Grant for Florida Summer Institute in Biostatistics and Data Science

FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine received a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to launch the first Florida Summer Institute in Biostatistics and Data Science in the Southeastern United States – and one of only 10 sites across the nation.

Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Announce Partnership with Costa Rica for CAR T Cell Therapy

Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), who together pioneered the research and development of the world’s first personalized cellular therapy for cancer — also known as CAR T cell therapy — have announced plans with Costa Rica’s CCSS, or the Caja Costarricense de Seguro Social (Social Security Program), to facilitate CAR T research in Costa Rica.

AI Could Predict Ideal Chronic Pain Patients for Spinal Cord Stimulation

Spinal cord stimulation is a minimally invasive FDA-approved treatment to manage chronic pain such as back and neck pain. The ability to accurately predict which patients will benefit from this treatment in the long term is unclear and currently relies on the subjective experience of the implanting physician. A study is the first to use machine-learning algorithms in the neuromodulation field to predict long-term patient response to spinal cord stimulation.

Moffitt Participating in National Pilot Project to Increase Diversity in Clinical Trials

Moffitt Cancer Center is participating in a national pilot project being conducted by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC). The pilot project is testing a research site self-assessment tool and an implicit bias training program focused on increasing racial and ethnic diversity among cancer treatment trial participants.

July Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Includes Analysis of Psychological Comorbidities and Irritable Bowel Syndrome Prognosis

The July issue of AJG includes an examination of psychological comorbidities and the prognosis of individuals with IBS, as well as clinical research and reviews on cirrhosis, GERD, pediatrics, celiac disease, probiotics, GI quality improvement, NASH, and more.

FAU Launches COVID-19 Registry and Repository to Advance Research

An essential strategy for managing COVID-19 requires vast amounts of real-world data to enable researchers to find patterns that will help to better understand and manage this disease. Florida Atlantic University has launched a registry and repository to contribute to new discoveries and knowledge related to COVID-19 and is currently enrolling study participants.

December Issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology Highlights Health Disparities and Social Determinants of Health

The December issue of The American Journal of Gastroenterology is now available and features new clinical research across a wide range of gastroenterology and hepatology topics, including health disparities, colorectal cancer, cirrhosis, pediatric gastroenterology, the environmental impact of endoscopy, and more.

UChicago Medicine joins BOOST-3 national trial to investigate treatments for traumatic brain injuries

As part of nationwide study to improve trauma care for severe brain injuries, researchers at UChicago Medicine are working to engage South Side residents and ensure representation among underrepresented communities.

NIH Awards $9.5 Million for Einstein-Mount Sinai Diabetes Research Center

Albert Einstein College of Medicine has received a $9.5 million, five-year grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to support the Einstein-Mount Sinai Diabetes Research Center (ES-DRC). The multi-institutional center is a leader in basic, translational, clinical, and community-based research and training in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders.

Caution urged for reopening schools to prevent spread of COVID-19 crisis

Irvine, Calif., June 15, 2020 — With fast-approaching preparations required for a new school year with no consensus plan yet in place, a team of clinicians, scientists and educators – including a University of California, Irvine pediatrician – stress the need for caution when re-opening America’s schools and advocate for large-scale viral testing in children, contract tracing and other actions to avoid compounding the COVID-19 crisis.