Tip Sheet: Weight loss drugs and cancer prevention, Fred Hutch at AACR, lymphedema Q&A — and new vice president and chief nursing officer

SEATTLE — April 3, 2024 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center research findings, patient stories and other news. If you’re covering the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting, please see our list of and contact to set up interviews.

HPV Self-Collection Kits Increase Screening Among Under-screened, Under-served Women in North Carolina

Five years ago, the World Health Organization (WHO) announced a global call to eliminate cervical cancer. Because nearly all cervical cancers are caused by an initial infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV), screening for the virus is critical to preventing and treating the disease.However, providing HPV screening only within clinical settings may limit access to screening for many under-served women across the United States and here, in North Carolina.

Sylvester’s Sexual Health After Cancer Program Expands to Meet Needs of Women with Cancer

Kristin E. Rojas, M.D., FACS, FACOG, assistant professor of surgical oncology in the DeWitt Daughtry Department of Surgery and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University Miami Miller School of Medicine, realized she had struck a chord with women being…

The Greatest Gift for Mom: Health and Wellness

Now more than ever, we are reminded that health and wellness should always be a top priority. National Women’s Health Month and Mother’s Day, both celebrated in May, are important reminders that women can take control of their health by making feasible lifestyle choices and focusing on preventive care to lower the risk of certain cancers.

Preventing Nurse Suicides as New Study Finds Shift in Method

In a new study, University of California San Diego School of Medicine and UC San Diego Health researchers report that the rate of firearm use by female nurses who die by suicide increased between 2014 to 2017. Published December 21, 2020 in the journal Nursing Forum, the study examined more than 2,000 nurse suicides that occurred in the United States from 2003 to 2017 and found a distinct shift from using pharmacological poisoning to firearms, beginning in 2014.