MSK: Cancer Isn’t Sheltering in Place

As the height of the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City and the Tri-State area begins to subside, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center oncologists are urging patients to schedule cancer screenings and treatments now – as the long-term toll of missed diagnoses and delayed treatments could be devastating for patients and their loved ones across the region and the country.

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Colorectal Cancer Q&A: The Truth about Screening, Prevention, and More

A colonoscopy is the best way to screen for and prevent colorectal cancer (CRC) because it allows your doctor to find and remove precancerous growths called polyps before they have a chance to turn into cancer.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that most people have colonoscopy screenings starting at age 50. People who are at a higher risk for CRC due to family history or other factors should begin having screenings at a younger age based on their doctor’s recommendation.

Cologuard, an at-home test, is not a preventive CRC screening tool because it detects cancer after you develop it.

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Researchers identify new therapeutic target for colorectal cancer

Researchers at the University of Toronto have identified a key protein that supports the growth of many colorectal cancers. The study, which will be published December 27 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that a protein called Importin-11 transports the cancer-causing protein βcatenin into the nucleus of colon cancer cells, where it can drive cell proliferation. Inhibiting this transport step could block the growth of most colorectal cancers caused by elevated βcatenin levels.

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Intestinal Stem Cell Genes May Link Dietary Fat and Colon Cancer

Two genes that appear to help stem cells in the intestine burn dietary fat may play a role in colon cancer, according to a Rutgers study. The study, published in the journal Gastroenterology, describes a new connection between the way cells consume fat and how genes regulate stem cell behavior in the intestines of mice.

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American College of Gastroenterology Announces Winners of Fifth Annual SCOPY Awards

American College of Gastroenterology announces 2019 SCOPY Award winners (Service Award for Colorectal Cancer Outreach, Prevention, and Year-Round Excellence) to recognize the achievements of ACG members in their community engagement, education and awareness efforts for colorectal cancer prevention

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Microbiome Provides New Clues to Determining Development of Colon Cancer

Findings showcasing a connection between bacteria in the microbiome and colon cancer, which may be used to screen younger populations at risk, were published in the journal Gastroenterology by researchers from the George Washington University.

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Antibiotics exposure linked to increased colon cancer risk

In an extensive “data mining” analysis of British medical records, researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center conclude that taking even a single course of antibiotics might boost—albeit slightly—the risk of developing colon cancer—but not rectal cancer—a decade later. The findings, reported in the August 20 issue of the journal Gut , highlight the need for judicious use of this broad category of drugs, which are frequently improperly or overprescribed, the report authors say.

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