Pairing imaging, AI may improve colon cancer screening, diagnosis

A research team from the lab of Quing Zhu, the Edwin H. Murty Professor of Engineering  in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, has combined optical coherence tomography (OCT) and machine learning to develop a colorectal cancer imaging tool that may one day improve the traditional endoscopy currently used by doctors.

Eligible younger U.S. adults less likely to meet recommended colorectal cancer screening guidelines and face greater disparities

Younger adults living in the U.S. are less likely to be screened for colorectal cancer than older U.S. adults, despite now being eligible under new screening guidelines, and face greater disparities than older U.S. adults who are eligible for screening, according to research from UTHealth Houston.

Plant virus plus immune cell-activating antibody clear colon cancer in mice, prevent recurrence

A new combination therapy to combat cancer could one day consist of a plant virus and an antibody that activates the immune system’s “natural killer” cells, shows a study by researchers at the University of California San Diego. In mouse models of colon cancer, the combination therapy eliminated all tumors and prevented their recurrence, which in turn resulted in 100% survival. The therapy also increased survival in mouse models of melanoma.

DNA Shed From Colon Cancers Into Bloodstream Successfully Guides Chemotherapy After Surgery

A multi-institutional, international study, led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and WEHI in Melbourne, Australia, found that testing for ctDNA after surgery and directing chemotherapy to ctDNA-positive patients reduced the use of chemotherapy overall without compromising recurrence-free survival.

DeepGI AI – A Thai Innovation for the Precision in Colorectal Polyp Detection

Chula Engineering and Chula Medicine co-invent an innovative device for a rapid gastrointestinal cancer detection that yields accurate results hoping to foster preventive medicine in gastrointestinal malignancy and reduce the number of cancer patients.

New Research Finds Computer Assisted Colonoscopy Identify More Precancerous Polyps Compared to Traditional Colonoscopy

Colonoscopies performed with artificial intelligence saw an increase in the overall rate of detection of adenoma, or cancerous and precancerous polyps, according to new data presented at the 2022 Digestive Disease Week Annual Meeting.

New Noninvasive Tests for Colon and Prostate Cancer Presented at the 2021 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting

Two research teams have developed new noninvasive tests that use either blood or saliva samples to diagnose cases of colorectal cancer or prostate cancer, respectively. Presented today at the 2021 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, these tests could facilitate screening efforts for colorectal cancer and allow clinicians to better distinguish early-stage prostate cancer from more benign prostate conditions.

Maternal obesity during pregnancy linked to higher risk of colorectal cancer in adult offspring

Infants whose mothers were obese during pregnancy may have a heightened risk of developing colorectal cancer later in life, according to new research led by public health experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

New Patient Guide from NCCN Jumpstarts Important Conversations About Anal Cancer

New and updated patient and caregiver resources from National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) offer jargon-free, state-of-the-art information on diagnosis, treatment, and surveillance for anal, colon, and rectal cancers.

Global Event Will Advance Early Age Onset Colorectal Cancer Research

In many countries around the world, patients under age 50 are fighting, some dying, of colon and rectal cancers. Early-Age Onset Colorectal Cancer is an urgent issue in cancer research and patient care around the globe. We all want to know why this is happening, fully aware that for some, time is running out.

Patient reactions to colorectal cancer estimated to become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths for those 20-49 by 2030

In a recent JAMA publication, researchers predict, “For the age group 20-49, colorectal cancer was estimated to become the leading cause of cancer-related deaths by 2030.” Fight Colorectal Cancer (Fight CRC), the nation’s leading advocacy organization, is committed to amplifying…

Rock Musicians Rufus Wainwright, Lisa Loeb, Tim Reynolds and More to Perform Free Virtual Concert for Colorectal Cancer Awareness

The American College of Gastroenterology Invites All to “Tune It Up: A Concert To Raise Awareness of Colorectal Cancer” Free Webstream Event Open to All on March 31, 2021 at 8:00 pm EDT

GI OnDEMAND Announces Partnership with Ambry Genetics for Genetic Testing and Counseling Services

GI OnDEMAND®, gastroenterology’s leading multidisciplinary virtual integrated care platform today announced a partnership with Ambry Genetics®, a leading clinical genetic testing company, to integrate online genetic counseling and testing services into gastroenterology practices nationwide. This partnership addresses a critical clinical need for identifying hereditary GI cancer syndromes to help guide potentially life-altering health care decisions.
GI OnDEMAND, a joint venture between the American College of Gastroenterology and Gastro Girl, Inc., will now offer the CARE (Comprehensive, Assessment, Risk, and Education) Program™ from Ambry Genetics.

American College of Gastroenterology Issues Updated Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines

The American College of Gastroenterology has issued updated evidence-based screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC), including a new recommendation to begin CRC screening at age 45 for average risk adults. Key updates include recommendations for screening individuals with family history of CRC or polyps, guidance on the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of CRC, quality indicators for adenoma detection rate and colonoscopy withdrawal time, as well as suggestions about evidence-based interventions to boost screening rates, especially among African Americans. The authors distinguish between one-step screening tests, such as colonoscopy, and two-step screening tests that require colonoscopy, if positive, in order to complete the screening process.

Putting the Spotlight on Colorectal Cancer Risk and Prevention during Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month

Colorectal Cancer Screening Saves Lives Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer related death for both men and women. However, if it is caught early, colorectal cancer has a 90% survival rate. This is why screening is…

Year or More Delay Between Abnormal, At-Home Screening and Colonoscopy Increases Cancer Risk

A new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found delayed time between abnormal stool-based screening and subsequent colonoscopy was associated with an increased risk of a cancer diagnosis and death from colorectal cancer.

Strange colon discovery explains racial disparities in colorectal cancer

The colons of African-Americans and people of European descent age differently, new research reveals, helping explain racial disparities in colorectal cancer – the cancer that killed beloved “Black Panther” star Chadwick Boseman.

Fight CRC To Present Research Findings on The Impact of COVID-19 on the Colorectal Cancer Community at 2021 GI ASCO

Fight Colorectal Cancer presents abstract at Gastrointestinal Cancer Symposium highlighting the need to address the barriers and opportunities for care within the colorectal cancer community during the COVID-19 pandemic

New combination therapy could help fight difficult-to-treat cancers with common mutations

UCLA scientists describe a new combination therapy that suppresses the MAPK pathway by holding cancer-driving proteins in a death grip. This combination of two small molecules has the potential to treat not only BRAF mutated melanoma but also additional aggressive subtypes of cancers, including melanoma, lung, pancreatic and colon cancers that harbor common mutations in cancer genes called RAS or NF1.

Colon cancer surgery performed by highly skilled surgeons improves long-term survival for patients

CHICAGO (October 30, 2020): Colon cancer patients achieve better five-year survival rates when the surgeons who treat them are rated as highly skilled, according to findings from what authors say is the first study to link a surgeon’s technical skills with improved long-term clinical outcomes. The study is published online in JAMA Oncology and virtually presented as part of the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer’s Annual Research Paper Competition.

Daily coffee consumption associated with improved survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other organizations report in a new study.

High-risk Patients for Colorectal Cancer Lack Knowledge About Colonoscopy

Many clinicians rely on self-reports from their high-risk patients about their need and proper interval for repeat surveillance colonoscopy. Researchers analyzed data over four years to explore the knowledge of these high-risk patients. Twenty-eight percent were unaware of either the need for a repeat colonoscopy or the proper surveillance interval. Of these, 16.6 percent were unaware of the proper three-year interval to obtain a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy. Also, 12 percent were not even aware that they required a follow-up surveillance colonoscopy.

Cancer health and education providers stress importance of colorectal cancer awareness following death of “Black Panther” actor

Colorectal cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and the third-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in the United States. Black people in the United States also have the highest rates of colorectal cancer of any racial or ethnic group, according to the American Cancer Society.

Leading Cancer Treatment Recommendations from NCCN Now Available in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish

NCCN Guidelines, containing expert recommendations for cancer care, are available in French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish can all be accessed for free at NCCN.org/global or via the free Virtual Library of NCCN Guidelines® App

Is 43 Too Young for Colon Cancer? UC San Diego Health Experts Available to Talk About Colorectal Cancer

With the recent death of actor Chadwick Boseman, many may be wondering how a seemingly healthy adult is diagnosed with a disease often thought of as illness of older adults. Although colorectal cancer is most often diagnosed in people 50…