colorectal cancer (CRC) screening

The Greatest Gift for Mom: Health and Wellness

Now more than ever, we are reminded that health and wellness should always be a top priority. National Women’s Health Month and Mother’s Day, both celebrated in May, are important reminders that women can take control of their health by making feasible lifestyle choices and focusing on preventive care to lower the risk of certain cancers.

Exploring Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Screening among Patients with Diabetes

Researcher at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has received $400,000 in awards to help identify and overcome multi-level factors such as patient, health professionals and clinic systems affecting optimal use of colorectal cancer preventative screening options for patients with elevated medical and social risks throughout the United States.

American College of Gastroenterology Issues Updated Colorectal Cancer Screening Guidelines

The American College of Gastroenterology has issued updated evidence-based screening guidelines for colorectal cancer (CRC), including a new recommendation to begin CRC screening at age 45 for average risk adults. Key updates include recommendations for screening individuals with family history of CRC or polyps, guidance on the use of aspirin to reduce the risk of CRC, quality indicators for adenoma detection rate and colonoscopy withdrawal time, as well as suggestions about evidence-based interventions to boost screening rates, especially among African Americans. The authors distinguish between one-step screening tests, such as colonoscopy, and two-step screening tests that require colonoscopy, if positive, in order to complete the screening process.

To Reduce Colorectal Cancer Disparities among African American Men, More Intervention Research Is Urgently Needed

African American men have the lowest five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer (CRC) out of any other racial group. A major factor is low adherence to recommended early detection screening. Yet published research on effective strategies to increase screening for this group specifically are minimal. These findings were published today in PLOS ONE.