Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Spring Allergy Season in N.J.

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 20, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick allergy specialist Leonard Bielory is available for interviews on the

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UCI announces employee, student back-to-campus plans

Irvine, Calif., April 20, 2021 — Taking what it has learned from remote work and learning practices over the past 15 months, the University of California, Irvine will begin instituting back-to-campus plans for employees and students that will include hybrid workplaces and flexible coursework. The transition back to campus will be managed in phases starting July 1, with the university being fully operational in person by Sept.

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Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) Clinic Opens at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt

Children who have experienced the rare and potentially life-threatening multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), which can develop within four weeks of exposure to the virus that causes COVID-19, are being followed closely in a multidisciplinary clinic at Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt.

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Rutgers Expert Addresses Questions on COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout and Variant Issues

Stanley H. Weiss, an epidemiologist in infectious and chronic diseases, and a professor at the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and the Rutgers School of Public Health, talks about vaccine side effects, the hesitancy that still exists and why it is important to get vaccinated when it’s your turn.

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Puerto Rico, Coronavirus Among Top Latino Twitter Topics During 2020 Election

Latinos discussed Puerto Rico and the COVID-19 pandemic more than any other subject on Twitter in the run-up to the 2020 election, according to researchers at the George Washington University. Spanish-language tweets mentioning “freedom” and “socialism” were also popular, while topics such as Obamacare and immigration did not gain much traction.

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New U.S. Carbon Monitor website compares emissions among the 50 states

Irvine, Calif., April 7, 2021 — Following last year’s successful launch of a global carbon monitor website to track and display greenhouse gas emissions from a variety of sources, an international team led by Earth system scientists from the University of California, Irvine is unveiling this week a new data resource focused on the United States.

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Women had “alarmingly high rates” of mental health problems during start of the pandemic

With research increasingly showing the COVID-19 virus is transmissible via smaller droplets suspended in air, there is growing concern current guidelines of mask wearing and social distancing are insufficient in indoor environments where people tend to be in close quarters. In AIP Advances, researchers in India show social distancing is equally as important as mask wearing when people indoors are just breathing or participating in normal conversation, even when there is no risk of coughing or sneezing.

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Flagging coronavirus misinformation tweets changes user behaviors, UAH research shows

When Twitter flags tweets containing coronavirus misinformation, that really does affect the degree of validity most people ascribe to those messages, says new research based on a novel branching survey by three professors at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), a part of the University of Alabama System.

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UCI to lead transfer of UC COVID-19 patient information to federal database

Irvine, Calif., March 24, 2021 – Vaccines are here, but as COVID-19 cases continue and variants spread, researchers need easy access to a wide variety of data to better understand the disease. Led by the University of California, Irvine, UC hospitals have received a $500,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to make this possible.

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Flu shot associated with fewer, less severe COVID cases

People who received a flu shot last flu season were significantly less likely to test positive for a COVID-19 infection when the pandemic hit, according to a new study. And those who did test positive for COVID-19 had fewer complications if they received their flu shot.

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Cost-Effective, Easily Manufactured Ventilators for COVID-19 Patients

Particle physicists are at the forefront for pioneering low-cost, mass-producible ventilators to help address the worldwide shortage. An international, interdisciplinary team spearheaded one such effort and presents the design in Physics of Fluids. The ventilator consists of a gas inlet valve and a gas outlet valve, with controls and alarms to ensure proper monitoring and customizability from patient to patient. The design is built from readily available parts and is presented under an open license.

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University of Washington to Help DHS Develop COVID-19 Digital Contact Tracing App Testing Criteria

DHS S&T awarded $959,305 to the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (UW-APL) to bring together a group of experts and trusted entities to develop digital contact tracing (DCT) application (app) testing criteria.

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Surveys Find Strong Support for COVID-19 Mitigation Measures Over Time, With Differences By Age, Beliefs, and Party Affiliation

A set of surveys fielded last year found that a large majority of U.S. adults support COVID-19 mitigation measures, including indoor mask wearing, social distancing, and contact tracing, with significant differences across certain groups.

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Second COVID-19 Wave in Europe Less Lethal Than First Wave

As Europe experienced its enormous second wave of the COVID-19 disease, researchers noticed the mortality rate was much lower than during the first wave. This inspired some to study and quantify the mortality rate on a country-by-country basis to determine how much the rate decreased. In Chaos, they introduce methods to study the progression of COVID-19 cases to deaths during the pandemic’s different waves; their methods involve applied mathematics, specifically nonlinear dynamics, and time series analysis.

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American Cleaning Institute Joins National Blue Ribbon Task Force To Stem Covid-19 Vaccine Hesitancy

The American Cleaning Institute (ACI), the trade association for the cleaning product supply chain, joined the National Blue Ribbon Task Force to Stem COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy. This is a national effort spearheaded by The Creative Coalition in partnership with the Dean of the Yale University School of Public Health that brings together the most significant influencers and leaders in the U.S. in a national campaign aimed at reducing vaccine hesitancy across the most vulnerable communities.

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Rutgers Expert Available to Discuss Coronavirus Risks a Year After Lockdowns Began

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 11, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Donald W. Schaffner is available for interviews on the likelihood of becoming infected by

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Chula Pharmaceutical Science Developed Herbal Nasal and Throat Spray to Prevent COVID-19 Infection

Chula Pharmaceutical Science, in collaboration with leading a Austrian institute, came up with a special intensive longan extract formula (P80) for throat and nasal spray that can reduce the amount of viruses that attach to the mucous membranes that may enter the body. Helps safely prevent all kinds of viral infections including the COVID-19 virus, with no side effects.

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Strategic Air Purifier Placement Reduces Virus Spread Within Music Classrooms

The University of Minnesota School of Music was concerned about one-on-one teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic and wondered if it should supplement its ventilation system with portable HEPA air purifiers. So, school officials reached out to Suo Yang, a professor within the College of Science and Engineering, and his team to figure it out. In Physics of Fluids, Yang and the researchers describe their work to predict how virus particles spread within a music classroom.

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Higher Pollen Levels Correlated With Increased Coronavirus Infection Rates

New Brunswick, N.J. (March 9, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick allergy specialist Leonard Bielory is available for interviews on a

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Rutgers Develops Rapid Test to Detect New Emerging Coronavirus Variants

Rutgers researchers have designed a new rapid test that can detect all three of the rapidly spreading variants of the coronavirus in a little over one hour – much shorter than the three to five days required by current tests, which can also be more technically difficult and expensive to perform.

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