Lung Cancer Screening Has the Potential to Reduce HIV Deaths

This World AIDS Day, the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS), of which the American Thoracic Society is a founding member, is calling on the health care community to increase lung cancer screening for people with HIV who are current or former heavy smokers and may be at high risk for developing the disease. As HIV- infected individuals have high smoking rates, smoking cessation should also be encouraged.

Addressing stigma is critical to containing the monkeypox outbreak

Inaccurate media coverage of the monkeypox outbreak has resulted in misinformation about the many ways it can be spread, resulting in stigma (shaming and biased attitudes) toward people who develop the disease. Nurses play a key role in delivering appropriate care related to monkeypox by creating safe spaces for affected individuals regardless of sexual behaviors, race and ethnicity, gender, or co-infections. These conclusions come from two papers in the November/December issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC), the official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Mount Sinai’s Yvette Calderon, MD, MS, Elected to National Academy of Medicine for Contributions to Emergency Medicine

Yvette Calderon, MD, MS, Chair of Emergency Medicine at Mount Sinai Beth Israel and Professor of Emergency Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, has been elected to the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). Election to the NAM is considered one of the highest honors in health and medicine, recognizing individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service. With her election, Mount Sinai has 26 faculty members in the NAM.

Gut bacteria may contribute to susceptibility to HIV infection, UCLA-led research suggests

New UCLA-led research suggests certain gut bacteria — including one that is essential for a healthy gut microbiome – differ between people who go on to acquire HIV infection compared to those who have not become infected. The findings, published in the peer-reviewed journal eBioMedicine, suggest that the gut microbiome could contribute to one’s risk for HIV infection, said study lead Dr.

Researchers Receive $4.2M Grant to Improve PrEP Access and Prevent New HIV Infections

Bronx county has the country’s fifth-highest rate of HIV diagnosis—but the lowest rate in New York State for use of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), medications that are extremely effective in preventing HIV infection. Physician-researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System have received a five-year, $4.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to compare two strategies for improving PrEP access and use in the Bronx.

State-level Earned Income Tax Credit linked to reduction in high-risk HIV behavior among single mothers

UCLA research finds that a refundable State-level Earned Income Tax Credit (SEITC) of 10% or above the Federal EITC was associated with a 21% relative risk reduction in reported behavior that could put single mothers at high risk for becoming infected with HIV during the previous year. Also, a 10 percentage-point increase in SEITC was linked to a 38% relative reduction in the same reported high-risk behavior the previous year.

Additional Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) trials data published in Nature Medicine

An embargoed study published in the Aug. 22, 2022 issue of Nature Medicine identifies a new biomarker that appears effective as a surrogate endpoint to reliably predict the ability of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to prevent acquisition of HIV-1, the most common type of the virus that causes AIDS. Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are defined by their ability to neutralize multiple genetically distinct viral strains.

New insights into HIV latent cells yield potential cure targets

In a presentation today at AIDS 2022, the 24th International AIDS Conference in Montreal, scientists with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ (NIAID) Vaccine Research Center (VRC) and their collaborators described how their use of cutting-edge technology revealed new insights into cellular reservoirs of HIV and what those observations could mean for the next steps in HIV cure research. NIAID is part of the National Institutes of Health.

Sylvester Plays Pivotal Role in Practice-Changing Anal Cancer Prevention Study Published by NEJM

The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has published the results of a study by Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School and other investigators on anal cancer prevention in people living with HIV (PLHIV) that will likely establish a…

PrEP Stigma Still High Among Men Who Have Sex With Men

Many male couples in the U.S. seem to be underestimating the effectiveness of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for HIV prevention, and educating partners together could improve the number of male couples who decide to adopt PrEP. These conclusions come from a study reported in the July/August issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC), the official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Cinco maneiras pelas quais pacientes imunocomprometidos podem se proteger da COVID-19

Conforme as famílias se reúnem para as festas de final de ano, é importante que os pacientes imunocomprometidos tomem medidas extras para ajudar a se proteger da COVID-19. Pessoas com o sistema imunológico enfraquecido correm maior risco de adoecer gravemente com a COVID-19.

New Study Suggests Healthcare Provider Biases Can Impact a Patient’s Access to Preventative HIV Drug

A new study published today reveals systematic biases among primary and HIV care providers about people who inject drugs and how those biases may impact access to pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), a preventive, prescription-based medication that significantly reduces the risk of HIV infection through sexual behavior and injection practices.

IHV Researchers Receive $6.5M to Create African Big Data Hub Designed to Address Public Health and Pandemic Preparedness

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM)’s Institute of Human Virology (IHV), a Global Virus Network (GVN) Center of Excellence, have received $6.5 million from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to streamline big data collection in Nigeria and South Africa in addressing public health needs of the COVID-19 and HIV pandemics.

Virtual Village Treats HIV-associated Loneliness in Novel UC San Diego Health Trial

A new trial by UC San Diego Health infectious disease specialist Maile Young Karris, MD, will use longitudinal questionnaires and qualitative interviews to assess the impact of living in an interconnected virtual village on the loneliness known to afflict older people with HIV.

Einstein-Developed Treatment Strategy May Lead to HIV Cure

Armed with a novel strategy they developed for bolstering the body’s immune response, scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have successfully suppressed HIV infections in mice—offering a path to a functional cure for HIV and other chronic viral infections. Their findings were published today in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Albert Einstein College of Medicine and City University of New York Researchers Receive $14.5 Million NIH Grant to Lead HIV Studies in Central Africa

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNYSPH) have been awarded a five-year, $14.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to continue leading and expand their research on HIV treatment and care in five Central African nations.

BIDMC researchers awarded $24.5 million by NIH to find a cure for HIV

A team led by Dan H. Barouch, MD, PhD, has been awarded $4.9 million in annual funding over the next five years to find a cure for HIV. Barouch was one of ten primary investigators to receive a 2021 National Institutes of Health (NIH) Martin Delaney Collaboratories for HIV Cure Research award, which aims to expedite human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cure research by bringing together research partners in academia, government, the private sector and the community; coordinating complex research studies, and mentoring the next generation of HIV cure researchers.

Hopkins Med News Update

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:

– COVID-19 NEWS: Johns Hopkins Medicine Study Shows Vaccine Likely Protects People with HIV
– Johns Hopkins Medicine Documents Stroke Risk in Cardiac Assist Device
– CBD Products May Help People with Epilepsy Better Tolerate Anti-Seizure Medications

Dr. Chandra Ford – Founding Director, Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health, Professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, available as expert on health equity

Dr. Chandra Ford, founding director of the Center for the Study of Racism, Social Justice & Health and professor of Community Health Sciences, UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, is available as expert on health equity. Prof. Ford’s expertise includes:…

UM School Of Medicine Researchers Receive NIH Avant Garde Award For Out-Of-Box, Innovative Concept To Cure HIV And Treat Co-Existing Addiction

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) Professor of Diagnostic Radiology & Nuclear Medicine, Linda Chang, MD, MS, received the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) 2021 Avant Garde Award (DP1) for HIV/AIDS and Substance Use Disorder Research — a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director’s Pioneer Award.

Wistar Scientists Discover Blood-based Biomarkers to Predict HIV Remission After Stopping Antiretroviral Therapy

New biomarkers that predict HIV remission after antiretroviral therapy (ART) interruption are critical for the development of new therapeutic strategies that can achieve infection control without ART, a condition defined as functional cure. Wistar Scientists have identified metabolic and glycomic signatures in the blood of a rare population of HIV-infected individuals who can naturally sustain viral suppression after ART cessation, known as post-treatment controllers. T