Internationally Renowned Breast Cancer and HIV-Associated Malignancy Expert to Join Mount Sinai

Mount Sinai Health System has recruited an internationally recognized expert in the management of breast cancer and HIV-associated malignancies, Joseph A. Sparano, MD, FACP, as Chief of Hematology and Medical Oncology and Deputy Director of The Tisch Cancer Institute (TCI). Dr. Sparano will also hold the Ezra M. Greenspan, MD Professorship in Clinical Cancer Therapeutics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and will oversee the expansion of clinical and research capacities of the Division and TCI.

Tip Sheet: Massive unmet needs in COVID-19 treatment, osteoporosis drugs for breast cancer, new bladder cancer target — and AIDS at 40

SEATTLE — June 2, 2021 — Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news. If you are covering news at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (June 4-8), check out our ASCO page highlighting Fred Hutch presentations and feel free to reach out to our media team for help sourcing experts: [email protected]

Laurie Garrett, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist, Named 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Award Recipient by the Rutgers School of Public Health

Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, has been named the 2021 Senator Frank R. Lautenberg Awardee by the Rutgers School of Public Health. She will serve as the School’s speaker at their 38th graduation ceremony, which will virtually launch on May 14, 2021.

Study Finds Low Awareness of PrEP, the Highly Effective Medication that Protects Individuals from HIV

A study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found that just under 20 percent of HIV-uninfected patients visiting Baltimore sexual health clinics were aware of pre-exposure prophylaxis medication (PrEP), a daily regimen that decreases a person’s risk of contracting HIV from sex by more than 90 percent.

Research finds people diagnosed with HIV in New York State were more than twice as likely to die from COVID-19

New research out of the University at Albany and the AIDS Institute at the New York State Department of Health found that through the middle of 2020, people diagnosed with HIV infection were significantly more likely to contract, be hospitalized with and die from COVID-19.

NIH Re-Funds ACTG for the Next Seven Years

The AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), the largest global HIV research network, has been re-funded for the next seven years by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and collaborating NIH Institutes.

HIV Up Close: Unprecedented View of Virus Reveals Essential Steps for Causing AIDS

Accomplishing a feat that had been a pipe dream for decades, scientists at University of Utah Health and University of Virginia have recreated in a test tube the first steps of infection by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). Doing so has provided up-close access to the virus—which is otherwise obstructed from view deep within the cell—and enabled identification of essential components that HIV needs to replicate within its human host. The research publishes in the journal, Cell.

Chicago Center for HIV Elimination awarded $5 million for community COVID-19 testing and prevention

The Chicago Center for HIV Elimination, housed at the University of Chicago, has been awarded $5 million over two years through the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) RADx Underserved Populations program to support a COVID-19 testing project to engage two disenfranchised populations.

$111 Million NIH Grant Awarded to Prevent and Treat HIV-Associated Cancers

The widespread use of antiretroviral therapy to suppress the HIV virus has helped tens of millions of people with HIV live healthier, longer lives—but an unfortunate consequence of people living longer with HIV is an increased risk of cancer. For 25 years, the AIDS Malignancy Consortium (AMC) has led national and international efforts to prevent and treat of HIV-related cancers. Now, Montefiore Health System and Albert Einstein College of Medicine have received a five-year, $111 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) to lead this research consortium.

Medical mistrust grounded in structural and systemic racism affects HIV care for Black women in the US South

For Black women in the southern United States, mistrust of the health care system that is grounded in structural and systemic racism is a key factor affecting participation in HIV prevention and treatment services, reports a study in the September/October issue of The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC). The official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care, JANAC is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

UM School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology Recruits Top HIV/AIDS Epidemiologist Shenghan Lai Along with Team of Researchers

IHV announced today that Shenghan Lai, MD, MPH and Hong Lai, PhD, MPH, in addition to three staff members, and two more to add, have joined the Institute of Human Virology. The faculty began their positions on April 1 with Professor and Associate Professor academic appointments in the UMSOM’s Department of Epidemiology & Public Health.

Rutgers Expert Can Discuss Global Climate Change Mortality Study

New Brunswick, N.J. (Aug. 3, 2020) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick Professor Robert E. Kopp is available to discuss a major study released today on the global consequences of climate change on death rates. The study by the Climate Impact Lab,…

New drug candidate reawakens sleeping HIV in hopes of functional cure

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created a next-generation drug called Ciapavir (SBI-0953294) that is effective at reactivating dormant human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The research, published in Cell Reports Medicine, aims to create a functional HIV cure by activating and then eliminating all pockets of dormant HIV—an approach called “shock and kill.”

History of insightful HIV research inspires neutron scattering approach to studying COVID-19

What began as novel investigations into HIV, abruptly pivoted to the novel coronavirus as it began to spread across the globe. Now, ORNL researchers are using neutrons to learn more about the SARS-CoV-2 protease—a protein enzyme that enables the virus to replicate within the human body. Insights on the protein structure and its behaviors will be used to create more accurate models for simulations in aims of finding drug inhibitors to block the virus’s ability to reproduce.

Funerals Pose Challenges Amid ‘Social Distancing’ and Travel Restrictions During the COVID-19 Pandemic

While a huge focus is on health and mortality during the coronavirus outbreak, not to be forgotten are those who are grappling with death from natural causes, diseases, accidents and crime. Funerals and visitations are the customary means of support friends and loved ones — but restricted travel and social distancing poses challenges.

Twitter chat with HIV/AIDS experts from the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, Nov. 26, to prepare for World AIDS Day

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing @JHUNursing is hosting a Twitter Chat in advance of World AIDS Day featuring its practitioners, researchers, and experts in HIV care, prevention, and science. Tuesday, November 26, 4:00 pm, EST Join and ask questions…

Senate Subcommittees Takes Important Step Toward Ending HIV While Resources to Address Concurrent Epidemics, Housing Remain Critical, but Unaddressed

The Senate Labor, Health and Human Services and Related Programs Appropriations subcommittee’s allocations of funding for the Ending the HIV Epidemic initiative in its proposed budget for 2020 represent a significant step toward an ambitious, critical, and achievable goal; however, lack of new resources to confront increasing rates of hepatitis C and sexually transmitted diseases with insufficient support for addressing opioid-related infectious diseases, falls far short of the response to these concurrent epidemics that is needed.