RESEARCH ALERT: Stopping Multiple Myeloma

Cedars-Sinai Cancer investigators have discovered a protein expressed on multiple myeloma cancer cells that drives disease growth and development. The new study found that blocking part of the protein’s unique signaling pathway stops myeloma growth in culture and in laboratory mice.

Adult Congenital Heart Surgery Team Saves a Life, Sparks an Idea

She was five days postpartum. Her first child was a perfect baby girl. What was supposed to be among the happiest times in Marisa Dominguez’s life was, instead, the scariest.

Cedars-Sinai Uses AI to Identify People With Abnormal Heart Rhythms

Investigators from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai found that an artificial intelligence (AI) algorithm can detect an abnormal heart rhythm in people not yet showing symptoms.

Navigating Childhood Asthma: Insights From a Pediatric Pulmonologist

As the seasons transition from warm fall nights to cool and wintry evenings, children with asthma often experience a rise in wheezing or chest tightness, because weather changes and cold temperatures are often asthma triggers.

$3.3M grant awarded to UTHealth Houston to study digital patient-reported symptom monitoring tool for patients with head and neck cancer

A five-year, $3.3 million grant to study symptom management in patients with head and neck cancer has been awarded to researchers from UTHealth Houston by the National Cancer Institute (1R01CA282149), part of the National Institutes of Health.

Study: Individuals Feel Sex-Specific Symptoms Before Impending Cardiac Arrest

Investigators from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai are one step closer to helping individuals catch a sudden cardiac arrest before it happens, thanks to a study published today in the peer-reviewed journal The Lancet Digital Health.

Urology Insights: Vision, Research and Education

Hyung L. Kim, MD, a leading urologic oncologist, skilled surgeon and accomplished researcher frequently funded by the National Institutes of Health, was recently selected to be the inaugural chair of the Department of Urology at Cedars-Sinai.

Lali Medina-Kauwe, PhD, Named Inaugural Chair in Medical Discovery

Cedars-Sinai has named Lali Medina-Kauwe, PhD, as the inaugural holder of the Carol Moss Foundation Chair in Medical Discovery.

Mount Sinai Participates in $40 Million Multisite Study of Alzheimer’s Disease in Asian Americans and Asian Canadians

Study represents a major milestone toward health equity for underrepresented populations in Alzheimer’s disease research

Study: Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair Safe, Successful

Long-awaited outcomes data of transcatheter edge-to-edge procedures to repair patients’ leaky mitral valves revealed the minimally invasive procedure to be safe and effective in nearly 90% of patients, according to Cedars-Sinai physician-scientists.

Mount Sinai Awarded Prestigious $1.3 Million Grant to Expand Research Training Program in Skin Biology

The Kimberly and Eric J. Waldman Department of Dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai will expand its research training program in skin biology with support from a five-year, $1.3 million T32 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS).

UT Southwestern cardiologist receives NIH Outstanding Investigator Award

UT Southwestern physician-scientist Hesham Sadek, M.D., Ph.D., has received the prestigious National Institutes of Health (NIH) Outstanding Investigator Award to support his ongoing research into mechanisms behind heart regeneration that could lead to treatments for heart failure.

Smidt Heart Institute Experts to Lead Training Sessions at Society of Thoracic Surgeons Conference

Cardiothoracic surgeons and investigators from the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai bring their leading-edge expertise in heart and lung surgery to the 59th Annual Meeting of The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS), Jan. 21-23, 2023, in San Diego.

Ultrasound Device for Pain Gets ‘Nod’ from Shark Tank and NIH Funding

A project using focused ultrasound is one of seven selected by the NIH, which also has received successful reviews from ABC’s “Shark Tank.” Researchers are developing a handheld probe to provide a noninvasive, non-opioid-based treatment for aggravated chronic pain for use in a physician’s office or potentially even at home. The device directs low-intensity ultrasound at the dorsal root ganglia – small bundles of nerves along the spine that control pain signals reaching the spinal cord – to provide means for precise treatment of back and leg pain.

Some Healthcare Workers Produced a Low Response to COVID-19 Vaccinations in a Study by Cedars-Sinai

A subset of healthcare workers vaccinated against COVID-19 had unexpectedly low responses to the immunizations, according to Cedars-Sinai investigators. The findings of the new study are published in iScience, a Cell Press journal.

NAU research collaborative receives $21M grant to continue pioneering work into health equity in the Southwest

A groundbreaking research collaborative at Northern Arizona University received another $21 million grant to continue its work to promote health equity and study health disparities among diverse populations of the American Southwest.

$1.8 Million NIH Grant Supports Head and Neck Cancer Research

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers Lluis Morey, Ph.D., and Ramiro Verdun, Ph.D., have received a $1.8 million NIH R01 grant to study the epigenetic mechanisms that drive head and neck cancers.

Artificial Intelligence Shown to More Rapidly and Objectively Determine Calcium Scores Than Physicians

A study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC): Cardiovascular Imaging shows that artificial intelligence tools can more rapidly, and objectively, determine calcium scores in computed tomographic (CT) and positron emission tomographic (PET) images than physicians, even when obtained from very-low-radiation CT attenuation scans.

FAU Awarded $1 Million NIH Grant for Florida Summer Institute in Biostatistics and Data Science

FAU’s Schmidt College of Medicine received a $1 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to launch the first Florida Summer Institute in Biostatistics and Data Science in the Southeastern United States – and one of only 10 sites across the nation.

How Tumors Make Immune Cells ‘Go Bad’

Investigators from Cedars-Sinai Cancer have discovered that cancerous tumors called soft-tissue sarcomas produce a protein that switches immune cells from tumor-attacking to tumor-promoting. The study, published today in the peer-reviewed journal Cell Reports, could lead to improved treatments for soft-tissue sarcomas.

Hypertension Elevates Risk for More Severe COVID-19 Illness

Hypertension more than doubles the risk of hospitalization related to Omicron infection, even in people who are fully vaccinated and boosted, according to a new study led by investigators in the Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai. The findings are published in the journal Hypertension.

$2.3 million NIH grant to fund research on ’smart’ knee replacements

A researcher at Binghamton University, State University of New York has received a five-year, $2,326,521 grant from the National Institutes of Health’s National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases to further her research into smart knee replacements.

Hormones Contribute to Sex Disparities in Bladder Cancer, Study Shows

Male sex hormones interfere with the body’s ability to fight bladder cancer, likely explaining why males experience higher cancer rates and more deadly disease, according to a new study co-led by a Cedars-Sinai Cancer investigator.

ASCO22: Lung Cancer Therapy Could Help Patients Live Longer

Results of a Phase II clinical trial led by Cedars-Sinai Cancer investigators indicate that an immunotherapy drug combination could extend the lives of those diagnosed with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, one of the most common forms of lung cancer. The research was presented today during the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting in Chicago, with simultaneous publication in the peer-reviewed Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Brain Cell Activity Plays Critical Role in CNS Disorder Outcomes

Investigators at Cedars-Sinai have comprehensively mapped molecular activity in the brain and spinal cord that is responsible for regulating the body’s response to central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Huntington’s disease and spinal cord injuries.

University of Kentucky Receives Renewed $11.4 Million Grant to Further Cancer Research

The University of Kentucky’s Center for Cancer and Metabolism (CCM) will continue its critical mission to research the metabolism of cancer with a renewed Centers of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant award from the National Institutes of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The prestigious grant — totaling $11.4 million — will continue to fund UK’s CCM over the next five years.

AI May Detect Earliest Signs of Pancreatic Cancer

An artificial intelligence (AI) tool developed by Cedars-Sinai investigators accurately predicted who would develop pancreatic cancer based on what their CT scan images looked like years prior to being diagnosed with the disease. The findings, which may help prevent death through early detection of one of the most challenging cancers to treat, are published in the journal Cancer Biomarkers.

$2.4 million NIH grant to fund research into better, faster diagnosis of lung nodules

A biomedical engineering professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York has received a $2.4 million grant to develop a faster, less painful way to diagnose malignant solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs).

Mechanisms of addiction: Psychology professor receives NIH grant for brain research

A five-year, $2.59 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will allow a psychology professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York to study the mechanisms of addiction.

Case Western Reserve University receives $16M federal grant to launch major research center on substance use and HIV

Thanks to a new $16 million, five-year grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, Case Western Reserve University is launching a multi-institutional research effort dedicated to deepening understanding of the relationship between substance use and HIV.

New NIH research study to investigate psychosocial determinants of cardiovascular disease risk among urban African American adults

The Biopsychosocial Health lab from Wayne State University has been awarded $3,590,488 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct a project titled “Stress and Cardiovascular Risk Among Urban African American adults: A Multilevel, Mixed Methods Approach.”

FAU Researcher Receives $1.8 Million NIH ‘Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award’

Raquel Assis, Ph.D., associate professor, College of Engineering and Computer Science, and a fellow of FAU’s Institute for Human Health and Disease Intervention, has received a five-year, $1.8 million “Maximizing Investigators’ Research Award” from the NIH. The goal of this early career award is to enhance the ability of investigators to take on ambitious scientific projects and approach problems more creatively.

From mathematics to medicine: Wayne State medical school and mathematics faculty team up to apply complex mathematics to analyze fMRI data

Research led by a Wayne State University Department of Mathematics professor is aiding researchers in Wayne State’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences in analyzing fMRI data. fMRI is the preeminent class of signals collected from the brain in vivo and is irreplaceable in the study of brain dysfunction in many medical fields, including psychiatry, neurology and pediatrics.

Tulane spin-out company to develop new treatment for pelvic organ prolapse

The Tulane spin-out BioAesthetics is teaming up with a Tulane biomedical engineering professor to develop a new graft for treating pelvic organ prolapse, which affects millions of women around the world.

BioAesthetics, whose CEO and COO are both Tulane graduates, is collaborating with Tulane researcher Kristin Miller, an associate professor of biomedical engineering whose lab will conduct the testing of the graft.

FAU Nursing Faculty Member Receives NIH K01 Grant for Breast Cancer Research

Tarsha Jones, Ph.D., principal investigator and an assistant professor of nursing at FAU’s Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, has received the National Institute of Health (NIH) K01 Career Development Award, a five-year, $772,525 award for a project titled, “Decision Support for Multigene Panel Testing and Family Risk Communication among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Young Breast Cancer Survivors.”

New Research on MRI Biomarkers May Aid in Evaluating Potential Treatments for Peripheral Nerve Diseases

Jun Li, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of the Department of Neurology at the Wayne State University School of Medicine, recently received a $246,172 R-21 grant from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop new strategies for assessing appropriate treatments of peripheral nerve diseases.

Rutgers Engineers Developing Rapid Breathalyzer Test for COVID-19

New Brunswick, N.J. (April 30, 2021) – Rutgers University–New Brunswick engineering professors Edward P. DeMauro, German Drazer, Hao Lin and Mehdi Javanmard are available for interviews on their work to develop a new type of fast-acting COVID-19 sensor that detects the presence…

Rutgers University’s Resilient, Innovative Year Confronting COVID-19

The last year, which has been unlike any other in Rutgers’ 254-year history, has centered on keeping the Rutgers community safe, providing top-notch health care, developing the first saliva test for the coronavirus and helping society cope with the biggest global public health crisis since the 1918 influenza pandemic.

Wayne State research team developing AI model to aid in early detection of SARS-CoV2 in children

Currently, there are no methods to discern the spectrum of COVID-19’s severity and predict which children with SARS-CoV-2 exposure will develop severe illness, including MIS-C. Because of this, there is an urgent need to develop a diagnostic modality to distinguish the varying phenotypes of disease and risk stratify disease.