Could a Novel Light Therapy Help People With Alzheimers?

Recently, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai a five-year grant to out whether exposing patients to a combination of light therapies will slow Alzheimer’s debilitating effects.

New research “sniffs out” how associative memories are formed

Has the scent of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies ever taken you back to afternoons at your grandmother’s house? Has an old song ever brought back memories of a first date? The ability to remember relationships between unrelated items (an odor and a location, a song and an event) is known as associative memory.

UF, UF Health announce gift and new $75 million initiative to expand Norman Fixel Institute

The University of Florida and UF Health on Tuesday, Sept. 14, announced an additional $25 million gift from the Lauren and Lee Fixel Family Foundation aimed at improving the lives of patients across the globe through the Norman Fixel Institute for Neurological Diseases at UF Health. The new investment will spur growth in the areas of national and international telemedicine, Alzheimer’s disease clinical research, mental health, traumatic brain injury and ALS and will help cultivate the next generation of expert researchers tackling these challenging diseases.

UIC researchers find evidence of possible link between herpes simplex and neurogenerative diseases

A new study by researchers at University of Illinois Chicago suggests that when the protein optineurin, or OPTN, is present in cells it restricts the spread of HSV-1, the herpes simplex virus type 1.In a “first of its kind” study, researchers also found a potential direct connection between neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), glaucoma, and the herpesvirus.

As dementia’s toll on the U.S. rises, new study shows major gaps in who gets care that could help them remain at home

A new study provides stark statistics about a reality that 6 million Americans with dementia and their families live every day: one where people with dementia receive unpaid care from spouses and adult children, and where some rely on paid help. The study finds major disparities in potential family caregiver availability, and the chance that a person with dementia will move to a nursing home.

Mayo Clinic Conference on Brain Health and Dementia to welcome people living with dementia, caregivers and health care providers

The inaugural Mayo Clinic Conference on Brain Health and Dementia will be held virtually on Oct. 29 from 9:15 a.m. to 2:15 p.m. CDT with an optional workshop to follow. The event is a collaboration among Mayo Clinic, AARP and the Alzheimer’s Association.

New Study Provides Structural Insights into How Cholesterol in the Brain Regulates Ion Channels and Alters Their Function; Findings Could Facilitate the Development of Therapeutics for Neurological Diseases

UNDER EMBARGO UNTIL 11am EST on August 24: Cell Reports   Senior Author: Paul A. Slesinger, PhD, Lillian and Henry M. Stratton Professor of Neuroscience and Director of the Center for Neurotechnology and Behavior, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai,…

First of its kind study using multi-omics approach identifies large list of candidate genes associated with alcohol use disorder

New York, NY (Aug 20, 2021) – Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have published the first study of its kind in the field of addiction genetics using a multi-omics approach to provide a large list…

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Stem cell treatment for dementia clears major hurdle

UCLA researchers have successfully grown restorative brain cells in large batches suitable for transplantation in patients. The therapy is designed to repair damage to the brain from white matter stroke, a “silent stroke” that can kick off years of cognitive deterioration and can accelerate Alzheimer’s disease. A new paper is published in the journal Stem Cell Research.

Do Some Diabetes Drugs Reduce the Risk of Alzheimer’s?

MINNEAPOLIS – People taking certain drugs to lower blood sugar for type 2 diabetes had less amyloid in the brain, a biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease, when compared to both people with type 2 diabetes not taking the drugs and people without diabetes. The new study, published in the August 11, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, also found people taking these drugs, called dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, showed slower cognitive decline than people in the other two groups.

Understanding Alzheimer’s Progression with Improvements to Imaging, Image Processing, Machine Learning

Because there is no ethical way to extract brain tissue from patients to look for clues about how amyloid plaques and protein aggregates proliferate, supplementary techniques are needed to better understand the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. During ACA’s 71st annual meeting, Abdullah Al Bashit, from Northeastern University, will discuss using computational techniques to help address these challenges. His work demonstrates how using small and wide-angle scattering along with state-of-the-art detection techniques will help probe the molecular structure and proliferation.

Obesity and Cardiovascular Factors Combine to Cause Cognitive Decline in Latinos

Obesity is a major public health issue among Latinos, and a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. But in a new study, researchers at UC San Diego report that cardiometabolic abnormalities, such as hypertension, are more strongly associated with cognitive decline than obesity alone.

65+ and Lonely? Don’t Talk to Your Doctor About Another Prescription

Lonely, older adults are nearly twice as likely to use opioids to ease pain and two-and-a-half times more likely to use sedatives and anti-anxiety medications, putting themselves at risk for drug dependency, impaired attention, falls and other accidents, and further cognitive impairment, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.

UNLV Alzheimer’s Researcher and Expert Panel Present First-Use Recommendations For Aducanumab

A group of six leading Alzheimer’s experts has convened to make the first recommendations for the appropriate use of aducanumab (Aduhelm, Biogen/Eisai), a newly approved treatment for early Alzheimer’s disease. The recommendations will help provide clinicians with greater clarity and…

Neuroscientists posit that brain region is a key locus of learning

Small and seemingly specialized, the brain’s locus coeruleus (LC) region has been stereotyped for its outsized export of the arousal-stimulating neuromodulator norepinephrine. In a new paper and with a new grant from the National Institutes of Health, an MIT neuroscience…

Evidence of sustained benefits of pimavanserin for dementia-related psychosis

Evidence of the sustained benefits of an investigational antipsychotic treatment for people with dementia-related psychosis has been published. Up to half of the 45 million people worldwide who are living with Alzheimer’s disease will experience psychotic episodes, a figure that…

Think About This: Keeping Your Brain Active May Delay Alzheimer’s Dementia 5 Years

Keeping your brain active in old age has always been a smart idea, but a new study suggests that reading, writing letters and playing card games or puzzles in later life may delay the onset of Alzheimer’s dementia by up to five years. The research is published in the July 14, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Alzheimer’s Association Welcomes CMS Announcement of National Coverage Determination Analysis on Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease

On behalf of all those living with Alzheimer’s disease, their caregivers, and their families, we appreciate the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) thoughtful consideration on coverage considerations for monoclonal antibodies targeting amyloid for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, including aducanumab, which was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).