Addressing Health Inequities Could Help Avert a Neurologic Health Crisis

The closing plenary session at ANA2022 spotlighted neurologic health inequities and presented new research finding that neighborhood disadvantage strongly predicted likelihood of death from neurologic conditions independent of individual wealth and demographics.

Many middle-aged adults wary of taking part in studies of dementia prevention drugs

Drug companies and university-based teams are working urgently to find and test new medications that could prevent or slow the decline of brain function in older adults. But a new study suggests they’ll need to work harder to find volunteers for their clinical trials.

Alzheimer’s Disease: Making Connections between Air Pollution and Neurodegeneration

Exposure to urban air pollutants such as ozone (O3) is increasingly linked with Alzheimer’s disease; yet because ozone cannot travel from the lungs to the brain, the mechanism by which it contributes to development of Alzheimer’s has been poorly understood.…

ACS awarded grant to develop resources for older adults with cognitive impairments undergoing surgery

The American College of Surgeons (ACS) is the recipient of a $100,000 grant from the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS) to develop comprehensive educational resources to improve surgical care and outcomes for older adults with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias who are undergoing surgery.

Why women may be more susceptible to Alzheimer’s disease

Case Western Reserve University researchers have identified a mechanism in brain tissue that may explain why women are more vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease—a finding that they say could help lead to new medicines to treat the disease. The researchers found that the female brain shows higher expression of a certain enzyme compared to males, resulting in greater accumulation of a protein called tau.

Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association announces UK’s Donna Wilcock as new editor-in-chief

The Alzheimer’s Association welcomes the University of Kentucky’s Donna M. Wilcock, Ph.D., as the new editor-in-chief of Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.Since its inception in 2005, Alzheimer’s & Dementia has sought to bridge the knowledge gaps that separate traditional fields of dementia research by rapidly disseminating new findings and acting as a forum for articles covering clinical investigations and basic, social and behavioral research.

Landmark Study of Biomarker Data May Enable Better Treatment for Early Onset Dementia

In a study publishing in Nature Medicine on September 22, 2022, University of California San Francisco researchers Adam Staffaroni, PhD, and Adam Boxer, MD, PhD, combined and harmonized clinical, neuroimaging, and fluid biomarkers from nearly all familial FTD clinical research participants across North America and Europe. With that data, they developed models of clinical and biomarker dynamics to determine the temporal sequence of biomarker and clinical changes in f-FTD before disease progression begins.

Daily Multivitamin May Improve Cognition and Possibly Protect Against Decline

New research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine shows that taking a daily supplement may improve cognition in older adults. In the study, researchers estimated that three years of multivitamin supplementation roughly translated to a 60% slowing of cognitive decline (about 1.8 years).

FAU, Israel Scientists ‘Team Up’ to Tackle Alzheimer’s-related Mood Disorders

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University, in collaboration with Tel Aviv University, have received a two-year, $379,177 grant from the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes for Health, on a collaborative project to study mood-disorders changes in Alzheimer’s disease.

Study identifies new dementia risk genes through novel testing approach

A new UCLA-led study has identified multiple new risk genes for Alzheimer’s disease and a rare, related brain disorder by using a combination of new testing methods allowing for mass screening of genetic variants in a single experiment. 

UNH Awarded $2.8 Million to Develop Robots to Care for People with Alzheimer’s and Dementia

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire will receive a five-year grant totaling $2.8 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop and test social assistive robots to aid in the care of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementia in the comfort of their own homes.

Online Chair Yoga Viable Exercise for Isolated Older Adults with Dementia

Researchers evaluated a remotely supervised online chair yoga intervention targeted at older adults with dementia and measured clinical outcomes virtually via Zoom under the remote guidance. Results showed that remotely supervised online chair yoga is a feasible approach for managing physical and psychological symptoms in socially isolated older adults with dementia based on retention (70 percent) and adherence (87.5 percent), with no injury or other adverse events.

Biochemistry: Peptide “Fingerprint” Enables Earlier Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Disease

Neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease or Parkinson’s disease are caused by folding errors (misfolding) in proteins or peptides, i.e. by changes in their spatial structure. This is the result of minute deviations in the chemical composition of the biomolecules. Researchers at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed a simple and effective method for detecting such misfolding at an early stage of the disease. Misfolding is revealed by the structure of dried residue from protein and peptide solutions.

Whole blood exchange could offer disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer’s disease, study finds

A novel, disease-modifying therapy for Alzheimer’s disease may involve the whole exchange of blood, which effectively decreased the formation of amyloid plaque in the brains of mice, according to a new study from UTHealth Houston.

WVU researcher says gene discovery may lead to new tests, treatments for Alzheimer’s in women

Women make up two-thirds of Americans who have Alzheimer’s disease, yet scientists have yet to determine what makes them so susceptible to the condition. Bernard Schreurs, a researcher with the West Virginia University School of Medicine and Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute, directs the West Virginia Alzheimer’s…

Research reveals how brain inflammation may link Alzheimer’s risk, sleep disturbance

A multisite research team from the University of California, Irvine, the University of Wisconsin–Madison and Wake Forest University has discovered that brain inflammation may link Alzheimer’s disease risk with sleep disturbance, which may aid early detection and prevention efforts by identifying novel treatment targets at preclinical stages.

John P. Hussman Institute to Lead International Genetic Study of Alzheimer’s Disease in People of Hispanic and African Ancestry

To build a resource that greatly expands Alzheimer’s disease genetic studies in the currently underrepresented African ancestry populations and Hispanic/Latinx groups, the John P. Hussman Institute for Human Genomics (HIHG) at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine will lead a major five-year, international, multi-site initiative with Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, Wake Forest University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Ibadan, which is the lead institution for the African Dementia Consortium (AfDC).

María de los Ángeles Ortega to Lead Nursing Clinical Care for Vulnerable Populations

Dr. Ortega’s newest role as associate dean of clinical practice now places her at the helm of clinical care for both the Green Memory and Wellness Center and the FAU and Northwest Community Health Alliance’s Community Health Center (FAU/NCHA CHC), operated by the Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing. She will collaborate with FAU/NCHA CHC executive director Karethy Edwards, Dr.PH, APRN, professor and associate dean for academic programs; and clinical director Desiree’ T. Weems, APRN, a certified nurse practitioner.

Fixed vial sizes for controversial Alzheimer’s drug could waste $605 million in Medicare spending each year

Medicare could waste up to $605 million per year on the controversial Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab if it is eventually approved for widespread use because it is supplied in vials containing fixed doses that may not be appropriate for all patients–resulting in the trashing of large volumes of unused drug

Recent Study Indicates High Prevalence of Recently Defined Non-Alzheimer’s Dementia

Researchers from the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging say a paper recently published in Acta Neuropathologica is the most definitive assessment yet of the prevalence of a form of dementia classified in 2019 and now known as LATE. The results show that the prevalence of brain changes from LATE may be roughly 40% in older adults and as high as 50% in people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Chula Dementia Day Center Can Help You Prepare for Old Age with a Clear Mind and Away from Alzheimer’s

Dementia Day Center, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, the Thai Red Cross Society prepares for Thailand’s anticipated aging society by offering various rehabilitation services to help slow down the decline of people with dementia, while planning to launch a professional course for caregivers, and establishing the “Bright Brain Club” to persuade people of all ages to learn and care for early brain health to avoid the possibility Alzheimer’s disease.

Johns Hopkins Medicine Researchers Link Sugar-Studded Protein to Alzheimer’s Disease

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they discovered that a special sugar molecule could play a key role in the development of Alzheimer’s disease. If further research confirms the finding, the molecule, known as a glycan, could serve as a new target for early diagnostic tests, treatments and perhaps prevention of Alzheimer’s disease, say the researchers.

Could Viagra Help Prevent Alzheimer’s Disease? Expert Source Available to Comment on This and Other Potential Breakthroughs as We Kick Off Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month

A new Cleveland Clinic-led study has identified sildenafil – an FDA-approved therapy for erectile dysfunction (Viagra) and pulmonary hypertension (Revatio) – as a promising drug candidate to help prevent and treat Alzheimer’s disease. Drug repurposing offers a practical alternative to…

Tufts University Researchers Discover New Function Performed by Nearly Half of Brain Cells

Researchers at Tufts University School of Medicine have discovered a previously unknown function performed by a type of cell that comprises nearly half of all cells in the brain.

The scientists say this discovery in mice of a new function by cells known as astrocytes opens a whole new direction for neuroscience research that might one day lead to treatments for many disorders ranging from epilepsy to Alzheimer’s to traumatic brain injury.

MSU research could lead to new Alzheimer’s treatments

Working with tiny bacteria, Michigan State University researchers led by Lee Kroos have made a discovery that could have big implications for biology.

The researchers revealed a new way that nature can inhibit or switch off important proteins known as intramembrane proteases — pronounced “pro tea aces” — which the team reported April 26th in the journal eLife.