Bleak Cyborg Future from Brain-Computer Interfaces if We’re Not Careful

The most promising method to achieve real-world BCI applications is through electroencephalography, a method of monitoring the brain’s electrical activity. EEG-based BCIs will require a number of technological advances prior to widespread use, but more importantly, they will raise a variety of social, ethical, and legal concerns. Researchers conducted a review of modern commercial brain-computer interface devices and discuss the primary technological limitations and humanitarian concerns of these devices in APL Bioengineering.

Engineered Neural Networks Help ID Responses Associated with Abnormalities in Parkinson’s Disease

Article title: Early functional changes associated with alpha-synuclein proteinopathy in engineered human neural networks Authors: Vibeke D. Valderhaug, Kristine Heiney, Ola Huse Ramstad, Geir Bråthen, Wei-Li Kuan, Stefano Nichele, Axel Sandvig, Ioanna Sandvig From the authors: “In this study, we investigate the…

NIH-funded study shows children recycle brain regions when acquiring new skills

Scientists studied the brain activity of school-aged children during development and found that regions that activated upon seeing limbs (hands, legs, etc.) subsequently activated upon seeing faces or words when the children grew older. The research, by scientists at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, reveals new insights about vision development in the brain and could help inform prevention and treatment strategies for learning disorders. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute and is published in Nature Human Behaviour.

Neuroscience scholarship dedicated to golf journalist Tim Rosaforte ’77

The University of Rhode Island has established an endowed scholarship for undergraduates in the field of neuroscience. The scholarship is named in honor of James Tim Rosaforte III ’77, an accomplished sports journalist and author well known in the world of professional golf. Rosaforte retired last year after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, following a distinguished 40-year career in newspapers and television.

New research may offer hope for Alzheimer’s patients

University of Kentucky Neuroscience Professor Greg Gerhardt’s new research program will provide answers to long-standing questions about the role of neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate in the progression of Alzheimer’s disease. A culmination of his nearly 40 years of brain research, Gerhardt’s study could help to develop new treatments for the disease.

Rush Researchers Develop New Measure of Brain Health

A new measure of brain health developed by researchers at Rush University Medical Center may offer a novel approach to identifying individuals at risk of memory and thinking problems, according to research results published in Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association on June 1.

Case Western Reserve researchers identify potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University have identified a potential new approach to better controlling epileptic seizures. Lin Mei, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosciences at the Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, who led the new study in mouse models, said the team found a new chemical reaction that could help control epileptic seizures.

Weizmann Institute Optogeneticists Use Mosquito Rhodopsins to Boost Brain Research

The Weizmann Institute’s Prof. Ofer Yizhar and colleagues used mosquito rhodopsins to create an optogenetics tool that is more precise, selective, and controllable than current techniques. In addition to increasing our understanding of the brain and advancing the field of optogenetics, the technology could lead to improved therapies for neurological and psychiatric conditions.

Early Screening Tool Leads to Earlier Diagnosis and Treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorder

Chemotherapy can induce a painful peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), a chronic condition and common adverse effect for cancer patients undergoing treatment. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues elsewhere, have used a mouse model to demonstrate the pivotal role of cholesterol in CIPN, and proposed a novel therapeutic approach to reverse it.

Care Protocol for Innovative Stroke Treatment at Hackensack Meridian Health JFK University Medical Center Published in Neurology Clinical Practice

A new treatment protocol that standardizes medical care for patients with acute stroke using an innovative clot-dissolving drug, has been reported by the stroke team at Hackensack Meridian JFK University Medical Center’s Stroke and Neurovascular Center at the Neuroscience Institute.

Neural implant monitors multiple brain areas at once, provides new neuroscience insights

How do different parts of the brain communicate with each other during learning and memory formation? A study by researchers at UC San Diego takes a first step at answering this fundamental neuroscience question, thanks to a neural implant that monitors multiple brain regions at the same time.

Experimental Biology 2021 Press Materials Available Now

Embargoed press materials are now available for the virtual Experimental Biology (EB) 2021 meeting, featuring cutting-edge multidisciplinary research from across the life sciences. EB 2021, to be held April 27–30, is the annual meeting of five scientific societies bringing together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community.

Not a Musician? Your Brain Can Still Tell What’s Music

Article title: Music-selective neural populations arise without musical training Authors: Dana Boebinger, Samuel Norman-Haignere, Josh H. McDermott, Nancy Kanwisher From the authors: “We show that music-selective neural populations are clearly present in people without musical training, demonstrating that they are a fundamental…

Disrupted biochemical pathway in the brain linked to bipolar disorder

In new research, scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have found for the first time that disruptions to a particular protein called Akt can lead to the brain changes characteristic of bipolar disorder. The results offer a foundation for research into treating the often-overlooked cognitive impairments of bipolar disorder, such as memory loss, and add to a growing understanding of how the biochemistry of the brain affects health and disease.

National Neurosurgery Organizations Collaborate to Establish Professionalism Policy for Meetings, Professional Events

Ellen Air, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Neurosurgery Residency Program at Henry Ford Health System and Chair-Elect of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS)/Congress of Neurological Surgeons (CNS) Joint Section on Women in Neurosurgery, is co-author of a new Professionalism and Harassment Model Policy created to provide a code of ethical behavior that promotes professional growth and the free exchange of ideas at neurosurgical meetings, educational courses, conferences and other sponsored events.

Psychedelic Science Holds Promise for Mainstream Medicine

A team of UNLV neuroscientists are uncovering how psychedelics affect brain activity. Their work, published recently in Nature: Scientific Reports, shows a strong connection in rodent models between brain activity and behaviors resulting from psychedelic treatment, a step forward in the quest to better understand their potential therapeutic effects.

A Remote, Computerized Training Program Eases Anxiety in Children

Using a computerized and completely remote training program, researchers have found a way to mitigate negative emotions in children. Results support the link between inhibitory control dysfunction and anxiety/depression. EEG results also provide evidence of frontal alpha asymmetry shifting to the left after completing an emotional version of the training. Computerized cognitive training programs can be highly beneficial for children, not just for academics, but for psychological and emotional functioning during a challenging time in their development.

Seeing schizophrenia: X-rays shed light on neural differences, point toward treatment

An international research team used the ultrabright X-rays of the Advanced Photon Source to examine neurons in the brains of schizophrenia patients. What they learned may help neurologists treat this harmful brain disorder.

Evan Snyder named Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering

The American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) has elected to its College of Fellows Evan Y. Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., professor and founding director of the Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. Snyder was nominated, reviewed, and elected by his peers and members of the College of Fellows for his seminal contributions to regenerative medicine.

First-in-Human Clinical Trial to Assess Gene Therapy for Alzheimer’s Disease

UC San Diego researchers have launched a first-in-human Phase I clinical trial to assess the safety and efficacy of a gene therapy to deliver a key protein into the brains of persons with Alzheimer’s disease or Mild Cognitive Impairment, a condition that often precedes full-blown dementia.

Tip Sheet: COVID-19 vaccines, SARS-CoV-2 mutations, shedding pandemic pounds – and nematode nerve cells

SEATTLE —Feb. 4, 2021 —Below are summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news with links for additional background and media contacts.We are looking forward to the Transplantation & Cellular Therapy Meetings, to be held online Feb. 8-12. Read highlights of Fred Hutch research to be presented, including on COVID-19 and cancer and new insights on treating graft-vs.

Jersey Shore University Medical Center Named a Top 100 Best Hospital for Stroke Care

Hackensack Meridian Jersey Shore University Medical Center was recently recognized as one of America’s 100 Best Hospitals for Stroke Care and received the Neurosciences Excellence Award for 2021, according to a national study by Healthgrades, the leading online resource for comprehensive information about physicians and hospitals. The academic medical center is one of only three hospitals in New Jersey that received recognition as a Best Hospital for Stroke Care.

Virginia Tech researchers uncover mechanisms that wire the brain’s cerebral cortex

A research team at the Fralin Biomedical Research Institute at VTC has identified the type of brain cell that produces a protein that is crucial for the formation of inhibitory circuits in the brain. This insight could one day help scientists establish the basis for developing new drugs that mature or repair cellular networks.