$5 million gift to establish new Center for Taiwan Studies at UC San Diego

Longtime campus supporters Chiu-Shan Chen Ph.D. ’69 and Rufina Chen have committed $5 million to the University of California San Diego to establish a new Center for Taiwan Studies within the Division of Arts and Humanities, highlighting the alum’s deep commitment to both giving back and supporting programs that expand cultural understanding of Taiwan and Taiwanese Americans.

Conrad Prebys Foundation Awards $500,000 Grant to Support UC San Diego Department of Music Outreach

The University of California San Diego Department of Music will expand its post-pandemic reach with support from a $500,000 grant from The Conrad Prebys Foundation. The grant, which contributes to the Campaign for UC San Diego, helps launch the department’s outreach to both regional audiences, and the international music community.

Supercomputers Illustrate the Mechanical Process of Cancer Growth

According to the World Health Organization, one in six worldwide deaths are attributed to cancer, but not due to initial malignant tumors. They were caused by the spread of cancer cells to surrounding tissues, which consist largely of collagen. That was the focus of a recent study by Stanford University and Purdue University researchers.

Supercomputers Help Advance Computational Chemistry

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have succeeded in developing an artificial intelligence (AI) approach to detect electron correlation – the interaction between a system’s electrons – which is vital but expensive to calculate in quantum chemistry.

Researchers Use Supercomputers to Better Understand the Sun’s Corona

As worldwide mandates prevented gatherings over the holiday season, crowds in Chile and Argentina donned masks and eye shields to take in some outdoor magic: a two-minute solar eclipse on December 14. A week before however, everyone had a chance to see what the eclipse might look like thanks to simulations generated on the recently launched ‘Expanse’ supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego.

‘Expanse’ Supercomputer Formally Enters Production

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego announced that its new Expanse supercomputer formally entered service for researchers following a program review by the National Science Foundation (NSF), which awarded SDSC a grant in mid-2019 to build the innovative system.

Supercomputers Help Model Potential SARS-CoV2 Protease Inhibitors for COVID-19

A team of researchers recently created a pharmacophore model and conducted data mining of the database of drugs approved by the U.S. Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to find potential inhibitors of papain-like protease of SARS-CoV2, one of the main viral proteins responsible for COVID-19.

New Study Finds That Parasites Can Drain Energy from Hosts Prior to Infection

A new study by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego and the Norwegian University of Life Sciences has found that a species of brain-infecting parasite can disrupt the metabolism of its host—the California killifish—both before and after infection.

UC San Diego Commits $2.5M to the Black Studies Project

This is a crucial time for each and every university to consider the role that Black studies plays in its intellectual and institutional formation, according to the conveners of the Black Studies Project (BSP) at UC San Diego. The current political moment has not only heightened the urgency of grappling with questions of Blackness and anti-Blackness, but has underscored the critical role that Black studies scholars and scholarship must play in this ongoing dialogue. Black studies has never been more relevant.

High-Performance Computing Aids in Predicting Oil Dispersal During Spills

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, thousands of oil spills occur each year in the United States. Although the majority of incidents involve less than one barrel, the spills have wreaked economic and environmental devastation for decades. Researchers recently created supercomputer simulations to better understand the fate of oil droplets for effective countermeasures.

Supercomputer Calculations Boost Our Understanding of Our Immune System

While researchers around the world race to develop an effective and safe COVID-19 vaccine, a team from the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego contributed to a study led by Vanderbilt Vaccine Center of Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) on T cell receptors, which play a vital role in alerting the adaptive immune system to mount an attack on invading foreign pathogens including the Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

Former UC San Diego Chancellor and UC President Emeritus Richard Atkinson and Rita Atkinson to Establish Physician Assistant Education Program at UC San Diego

University of California President Emeritus and former UC San Diego Chancellor Richard Atkinson and Rita Atkinson have committed to give nearly $7 million to establish and endow the Richard C. and Rita L. Atkinson UC San Diego Physician Assistant Education Program at UC San Diego.

UC San Diego launches Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies program and minor, a welcome addition to campus

UC San Diego will have a new program in Asian American and Pacific Islander Studies starting in fall, a long-awaited move that many students, faculty, staff and alumni have been eager to see.

Offering cultural programming and the university’s very first minor in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies, the new program is housed in the Institute of Arts and Humanities, along with 14 additional programs.

Robots to Help Children Touch the Outside World

A team of University of California researchers is working to improve telepresence robots and the algorithms that drive them to help children with disabilities stay connected to their classmates, teachers and communities. The effort is funded by a $1 million grant from the National Robotics Initiative at the National Science Foundation.

National Science Foundation Funds Development of a Science Gateway for New Materials Discovery

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1 million Research Advanced by
Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering (RAISE) grant to a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego, the University of Minnesota, Carnegie Mellon University, and Cornell University to create the X-ray Imaging of Microstructures Gateway (XIMG), a science gateway designed to make it possible for global material sciences researchers to study the behavior of new and existing materials using X-ray diffraction.

National Science Foundation-funded CloudBank Now Operational

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego and its partners at the University of Washington (UW), UC Berkeley, and Strategic Blue have entered production operations of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded CloudBank program, which aims to simplify the use of public clouds across computer science research and education.

OpenTopography Collaboration Awarded New Four-Year Grant

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has renewed funding for OpenTopography, a science gateway that provides online access to Earth science oriented high-resolution topography data and processing tools to a broad user community advancing research and education in areas ranging from earthquake geology to ecology and hydrology.

Supercomputers Help Uncover ‘Noisy’ Neutron Star Collisions

A series of simulations using multiple supercomputers, including Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego, suggests that when the neutron stars’ masses are different enough, the result is far noisier. The models predicted an electromagnetic ‘bang,’ which isn’t present when the merging stars’ masses are similar, according to researchers.

Supercomputers Simulate Environmental Changes in Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) researchers used supercomputer simulations to examine impacts of both regional and global changes affecting the Chesapeake Bay. They discovered that historical increases in fertilizers and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have forced the bay to behave increasingly like a small sea on a continental shelf rather than a traditional estuary.

Does Remote Instruction Make Cheating Easier?

Today, colleges across the nation are making critical decisions for the coming academic year. For some, all courses will be online; for others, the decision may be to have some classes offered in person, and the rest conducted in remote or hybrid formats. Higher education is embracing virtual learning in what could become the norm in a post-pandemic future—leading to the question: Does remote instruction and cheating go hand in hand?

Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used SDSC’s Comet supercomputer to validate a model using a machine learning technique called Dynamic Time Lag Regression (DTLR) to help predict the solar wind arrival near the Earth’s orbit from physical parameters of the Sun.

National Science Foundation Awards $5 Million to Develop Innovative AI Resource

The NSF has awarded the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego a $5 million grant to develop a high-performance resource for conducting artificial intelligence (AI) research across a wide swath of science and engineering domains.

SDSC’s Sherlock Cloud Announces ‘Skylab’ Cloud Solution

The Sherlock Division of the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego has broadened its secure Cloud solutions portfolio to offer Skylab, an innovative customer-owned Cloud platform solution that provides a self-standing, compliant environment for secure workloads in the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud.

Cheryl Anderson Named Founding Dean of School of Public Health at UC San Diego

Dr. Cheryl Anderson, professor and interim chair of the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health in the School of Medicine at the University of California San Diego, has been named founding dean of The Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science. The school was established at UC San Diego in 2019 with a $25 million lead gift from the Dr. Herbert and Nicole Wertheim Family Foundation with an emphasis on research and education designed to prevent disease, prolong life and promote health through organized community efforts.

$1M Gift Speeds COVID-19 Testing and Tracking at UC San Diego

A $1M gift from the John and Mary Tu Foundation is accelerating the efforts of UC San Diego translational research virologist Davey Smith to increase the number of people tested for COVID-19, as well as develop new ways to track and treat the virus. Smith and his team are studying how the disease spreads to better inform contact tracing, as well as leading clinical trials to test new drugs for treatment of COVID-19.

These flexible feet help robots walk faster

Roboticists at the University of California San Diego have developed flexible feet that can help robots walk up to 40 percent faster on uneven terrain such as pebbles and wood chips. The work has applications for search-and-rescue missions as well as space exploration.

Supercomputer Simulations Help Advance Electrochemical Reaction Research

University of Texas at Austin researchers recently simulated the catalytic mechanism and atomic structure of nickel-doped graphene using Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) and Stampede2 at the Texas Advanced Computing Center. The simulations showed how the catalyst converts carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, an important feedstock for chemical engineering.

UC San Diego Researchers Optimize Microbiome Tool for Computer GPUs

University of California San Diego researchers have ported the popular UniFrac microbiome tool to graphic processing units (GPUs) in a bid to increase the acceleration and accuracy of scientific discovery, including urgently needed COVID-19 research.

Researchers Develop Potential COVID-19 Protease Inhibitors

Researchers at UC San Diego recently created a pharmacophore model and conducted data mining of the conformational database of FDA-approved drugs that identifies 64 compounds as potential inhibitors of the COVID-19 protease. Among the selected compounds are two HIV protease inhibitors, two hepatitis C protease inhibitors, and three drugs that have already shown positive results in testing with COVID-19.

SDSC’s Comet Supercomputer, TSCC Available for COVID-19 Research

The San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California San Diego is providing priority access to its high-performance computer systems and other resources to researchers advancing our understanding of the virus and efforts to develop an effective vaccine in as short a time as possible.