High-Performance Computing Aids in Predicting Oil Dispersal During Spills

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, thousands of oil spills occur each year in the United States. Although the majority of incidents involve less than one barrel, the spills have wreaked economic and environmental devastation for decades. Researchers recently created supercomputer simulations to better understand the fate of oil droplets for effective countermeasures.

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Supercomputer Simulations Reveal Scope of Lake Erie Plastic Waste Pollution

The transport of nine types of plastics floating in Lake Erie was modeled in two studies that used the Comet supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) to compare a two-dimensional model with a new Great Lakes microplastic dataset and then develop the first ever three-dimensional mass estimate for plastic in Lake Erie.

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Supercomputer Calculations Boost Our Understanding of Our Immune System

While researchers around the world race to develop an effective and safe COVID-19 vaccine, a team from the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego contributed to a study led by Vanderbilt Vaccine Center of Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) on T cell receptors, which play a vital role in alerting the adaptive immune system to mount an attack on invading foreign pathogens including the Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2.

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National Science Foundation Funds Development of a Science Gateway for New Materials Discovery

The National Science Foundation has awarded a $1 million Research Advanced by
Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering (RAISE) grant to a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego, the University of Minnesota, Carnegie Mellon University, and Cornell University to create the X-ray Imaging of Microstructures Gateway (XIMG), a science gateway designed to make it possible for global material sciences researchers to study the behavior of new and existing materials using X-ray diffraction.

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National Science Foundation-funded CloudBank Now Operational

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego and its partners at the University of Washington (UW), UC Berkeley, and Strategic Blue have entered production operations of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded CloudBank program, which aims to simplify the use of public clouds across computer science research and education.

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OpenTopography Collaboration Awarded New Four-Year Grant

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has renewed funding for OpenTopography, a science gateway that provides online access to Earth science oriented high-resolution topography data and processing tools to a broad user community advancing research and education in areas ranging from earthquake geology to ecology and hydrology.

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Supercomputers Help Uncover ‘Noisy’ Neutron Star Collisions

A series of simulations using multiple supercomputers, including Comet at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego, suggests that when the neutron stars’ masses are different enough, the result is far noisier. The models predicted an electromagnetic ‘bang,’ which isn’t present when the merging stars’ masses are similar, according to researchers.

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Supercomputers Simulate Environmental Changes in Chesapeake Bay

Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) researchers used supercomputer simulations to examine impacts of both regional and global changes affecting the Chesapeake Bay. They discovered that historical increases in fertilizers and atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have forced the bay to behave increasingly like a small sea on a continental shelf rather than a traditional estuary.

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Supercomputer Simulations Help Researchers Predict Solar Wind Storms

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used SDSC’s Comet supercomputer to validate a model using a machine learning technique called Dynamic Time Lag Regression (DTLR) to help predict the solar wind arrival near the Earth’s orbit from physical parameters of the Sun.

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National Science Foundation Awards $5 Million to Develop Innovative AI Resource

The NSF has awarded the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego a $5 million grant to develop a high-performance resource for conducting artificial intelligence (AI) research across a wide swath of science and engineering domains.

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Supercomputer Simulations Show How DNA Prepares Itself for Repair

Researchers from Harvard University and the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston recently used the Comet supercomputer at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California San Diego to uncover the novel ways in which DNA prepares itself for repair.

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