Making science more accessible to people with disabilities

The pandemic prompted workplace changes that proved beneficial to people with disabilities in science, technology, engineering, math and medicine (STEMM), but there’s fear that these accommodations will be rolled back. With International Day of Persons with Disabilities taking place on Dec. 3, a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York is calling for ways to make work in STEMM more accessible.

Hertz Foundation Announces $5 Million Fellowship Gift Honoring Inventor and Entrepreneur Dr. Nathan Myhrvold

The Fannie and John Hertz Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to building a stronger nation through science and technology leadership, today announced a new fellowship honoring Dr. Nathan Myhrvold, a Hertz Fellow and one of the most visionary technology and business leaders of our time.

Study: Live Chat Boosts College Women’s Class Participation

Women much more enthusiastically embraced the live chat function during pandemic Zoom classes than men, according to a new UNLV study. Researchers hope the data could be a key to broadening underrepresented groups’ access to STEM disciplines as colleges incorporate technology into hybrid and even in-person courses.

REGISTRATION DEADLINE EXTENDED FOR SAN JOAQUIN ‘EXPANDING YOUR HORIZONS’ CONFERENCE

The San Joaquin Expanding Your Horizons (SJEYH) Conference has extended the deadline to register to Wednesday, Oct. 26. This is the first time since 2019 that SJEYH will be held in person and organizers are hoping to reach pre-pandemic registration numbers. This year marks the 30-year anniversary of SJEYH, an annual conference geared toward young women in grades 6-12, designed to increase interest in and foster awareness of careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

San Joaquin ‘Expanding Your Horizons’ Conference Returns In-Person to Celebrate 30 Years

Registration is now open for the San Joaquin Expanding Your Horizons (SJEYH) Conference, celebrating its 30-year anniversary with the theme, “STEM: It’s Like Magic But Real.” The conference will be held on Sat., Nov. 5, at the University of the Pacific in Stockton from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Check-in starts at 8:15 a.m. SJEYH is geared toward young women in grades 6-12 and is designed to increase interest in and foster awareness of careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). Deadline to register is Oct. 15.

FAU Lands $478,699 NASA Grant to Inspire Local High School Students in STEM

FAU was one of only eight institutions in the nation to be awarded NASA’s Minority University Research and Education (MUREP) award for the MUREP Aerospace Academy (MAA). Through cooperative agreement awards, MAA funding affords minority-serving institutions the opportunity to develop exciting new avenues to inspire local high school students in the STEM (science-technology-engineering-mathematics) fields.

Diversity magazine honors Binghamton University’s Watson College Scholars Program

Binghamton University’s Watson College Scholars Program has received the 2022 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the largest and oldest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education.

UAlbany Tapped to Lead $2.5 Million NSF Grant Aimed at Increasing STEM Participation Among Underrepresented Students

The five-year, National Science Foundation grant will support the SUNY Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation program, a collaboration among 15 SUNY institutions that has played an instrumental role in diversifying the nation’s STEM workforce over the last 20-plus years.

Get More from Your Lunch Break with Bite-Size Science

Take a break for lunch and nourish your brain with the latest in scientific discussions, presented by experts at Jefferson Lab. The second season of the lab’s summer series, Bite-Size Science, is now underway. The Bite-Size Science lunchtime lecture series features half-hour, live-streamed presentations on lab-related science, engineering and technology topics and presented by leaders in their fields. The presentations are tailored to non-scientists and are brief, free, and feature a chat feature for Q&A with the presenters.

DOE’s Office of Science to Support 133 Outstanding University and Community College Students

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Science will sponsor the participation of 133 undergraduate students from across the nation in two STEM-focused workforce development programs at 13 DOE national laboratories and facilities during fall 2022. Collectively, these programs help ensure that DOE and our nation have a strong, sustained workforce trained in the skills needed to address the energy, environmental, and national security challenges of today and tomorrow.

NSF funds training program to boost regional quantum workforce

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is investing $3 million in a new graduate student training program for aspiring scientists and educators who want to explore careers in quantum science at St. Louis-area research laboratories, private companies and other facilities.Sophia Hayes, vice dean of graduate education and professor of chemistry, and Kater Murch, professor of physics, both in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St.

Real-time flood sensors, urban farms, autonomous cars, dancing drones and more at NYU Tandon’s Research Excellence Exhibit

The NYU Tandon School of Engineering will showcase over 40 innovative and future-forward research projects by faculty and students, along with interactive, family-friendly tech activities, at its 2022 Research Excellence Exhibit.The annual expo, in its ninth year, takes place on Friday, April 29, 1:00 p.m. to 4 p.m.

NSF funds UCI project to boost STEM degree success for underrepresented students

The National Science Foundation has awarded almost $3 million over a five-year period to The Institute for Meaningful Engagement at the University of California, Irvine. This new education project will explore the environmental factors prompting underrepresented students to leave science, technology, engineering and math programs and investigate how faculty can foster better classroom cultures to retain them. A multidisciplinary leadership team will partner with the deans of UCI’s six STEM schools to accomplish this.

Climate Champion Professor Mihri Ozkan discusses recent advances in the development and application of CO2 capture materials and also addresses the main challenges that need to be overcome in order to bring these material technologies to the market.

Mihri Ozkan, professor of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of California, Riverside, will be discussing her team’s research at the upcoming 2021 MRS Fall Meeting in Boston. See Symposium EN13-Climate Change Mitigation Technologies. The pace of…

Campaigning for More Marie Curies: More Women Means Changes for Physics, Engineering

Amy Sue Bix, a leading expert on the history of science and women and gender studies, will speak in an upcoming Lyne Starling Trimble lecture Wednesday, Sept. 29, in a live webcast. Her talk will delve into how the dramatic shift of girls and young women toward STEM occurred, how diversity will play a role in the nature and purpose of science and engineering, the changes in gender relations in the scientific community, and escalating concern for girls’ psychological well-being and personal opportunities.

Long Island Institutions Model the Future of Diverse STEM Education

In pursuit of diversifying the STEM education system, academic and research institutions on Long Island have come together to support emerging STEM professors from underrepresented minority groups. The newly formed collaboration, called the Alliances for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP) Predominately Undergraduate Institutions (PUI), includes Stony Brook University, Suffolk County Community College, Farmingdale State College, and Brookhaven National Laboratory.

The Lab in the living room: Summer interns delve into plasma and fusion research from their homes

Summer interns working for PPPL did hands-on research from their computers in their bedrooms or on their dining room tables all over the U.S. They worked closely with PPPL physicists and engineers on research aimed at understanding ionized gases called plasmas.

$1.9M NSF-funded initiative to transform UIC undergraduate chemistry offerings

Supported by a five-year, $1.9 million grant from the National Science Foundation, the University of Illinois Chicago department of chemistry will launch a project consisting of evidence-based research of teaching and learning practices, course and curriculum revisions and faculty development, all with the intention of enhancing STEM education for undergraduate students.

Equity in STEM can be driven by scientific societies

In a new paper published in The Anatomical Record, authors Dr. Melissa A. Carroll (The George Washington University, School of Medicine and Health Sciences), Shawn Boynes (American Association for Anatomy), Dr. Loydie A. Jerome-Majewska (McGill University), and Dr. Kimberly S. Topp (University of California San Francisco), discuss how scientific societies can be drivers of change in academia, focusing on the American Association for Anatomy as a case study.

PPPL Physicist Erik Gilson joins Secretary of Energy in panel discussion on DOE internships

PPPL physicist Erik Gilson, a long-time Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship mentor, joins U.S. Secretary of Energy Jannifer Grandholm and other mentors and former interns on a panel discussion about the U.S. Department of Energy’s internship programs

Summer Immersion Experience opening STEM doors at WVU for incoming first-generation, underrepresented students

Before the start of the fall semester, several new West Virginia University students are already asking research questions and trying to answer them with guidance from WVU scientists while, in certain cases, getting their feet wet.

Department of Energy Announces $2.85 Million to Support Undergraduate Research Traineeships at HBCUs and other MSIs

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy awarded over $2.85 million with a focus on broadening and diversifying the nuclear and particle physics research communities through research traineeships for undergraduates from Historically Black Colleges and Universities and other Minority Serving Institutions.

Nurturing an early interest in neuroscience

Last year’s lockdowns confined most people to their homes. For teenagers on summer break, a season usually dedicated to recreation and outdoor exploration, this meant long days of boredom. But for Nikhita Kaushik, who just finished her sophomore year at Irvine’s Arnold O. Beckman High School, the free time was a blessing. It enabled her to dive into her passion for neuroscience and establish the Southern California Youth Neuroscience Association.

CUR Engineering Division Announces 2021 Mentoring Awardees, Student Video Competition Winners

The Engineering Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Mentoring Awards and winners of its Student Video Competition.

Scholarship and Practice of Undergraduate Research Issue Features Undergraduate Research in Community Colleges

The spring 2021 issue of Scholarship and Practice of Undergraduate Research (SPUR), the academic journal of the Council on Undergraduate Research, focuses on dynamic programs and initiatives advancing undergraduate research in community colleges.

Department of Energy Selects 32 Students for Prestigious Computational Fellowships

Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced the selection of 32 outstanding undergraduate and graduate students across the nation to receive the prestigious DOE Computational Science Graduate Fellowship, jointly managed by the Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA).